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FrankM

Grill Masters
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About FrankM

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    Male
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    Yorba Linda, CA
  1. I wasn't going to say anything about this, since I know for certain that many of you mastered the art of barbecue long ago so why should my little success matter. But I just can't help myself, I gotta tell somebody. I've tried and re-tried over the years and produced some not very good and some just okay examples, but last Sunday I nailed it. This would be my second attempt on my Weber kettle. The first try was okay. Not great, just okay. In thinking about that last effort I identified a couple areas I could improve on. I set up my kettle for indirect with Minion method briquettes on one side and water pan on the other. Lit the fire and closed off the vents to bring the temp down to 250°. Don't be in a rush. This is where I screwed up the last time, in that I put the ribs on before the temp was stabilized. In plain English it was too darn hot. I was using the lid thermometer as well as an oven thermometer on the indirect side of the grate. I finally got them in sync at 250°, added a nice piece of pecan wood and put my dry rubbed loin ribs on bone side down. I had buried two pieces of pecan in the unlit coals to give me some smoke later on. I waited an hour then turned the ribs. I was a little concerned as I didn't see a lot of smoke pouring out but it smelled good so I pressed on. No flip here, just a turn to keep from overcooking one side although that was not a problem with only one rack. The temperature was rock solid at 250° At two hours I wrapped the ribs in HD foil and sprayed them with a mixture of apple juice and cider vinegar for a Texas cheat, and put them back on the grill. At this point the ribs weren't showing any signs of pull back so I cracked a vent to let the temp creep up to 275°. At the end of three hours I unwrapped the ribs, now that's what I'm talking about!!!!! There was a nice uniform pull back all across the rack. I'm thinking, man we are really close here, I better be careful to not overcook this babies. When I picked up one end with my tongs they really bent so I knew I was close. So back onto the grill which was still at 275° and now I started saucing. Waited ten minutes, sauced again, waited another 10 -12 minutes, sauced both sides and loaded them onto a platter and into the house for a short rest. I cut them apart and let my wife go first as she's the canary in the coal mine. In fact they were fantastic, moist, nice smoke ring, meat just sliding off the bone. They were so good that SHE wanted to have the leftovers Monday night. This is from a woman that doesn't ever want ribs, so I took that as a pretty strong endorsement that I finally got it right. This was a major hurdle for me and I feel really good that I can finally produce something that can be enjoyed with no excuses. Thanks for listening/reading, I just had to get that out. Frank
  2. What Makes A Regulator Go Bad?

    Cuskit, Sorry about the double post. Ronald, I have another 20LB tank which is full and even though it occurred to me, I didn't swap them since the one in there now still has a lot of LP in it. Because of that I also discounted the notion that it might be related to the cold temps. If the tank or the valve on it were to be faulty what do you do in that case? What happens to the LP? Can they be serviced and/or repaired?
  3. The other night I went out to use my Kirkland Signature series grill and immediately noted something was not right. Basically I was barely getting enough gas flow to light the burners. Since it was dark and cold I left it to Saturday so I could see what I was doing. My first thought was spiders, but that didn't seem right as every burner was affected. I had a spare regulator that I had received from Nexgrill and decided to give it a try. Made the change and voila, back in business. I did notice that the replacement had a slightly larger exit orifice than the original and wondered if that may be covering up a still present problem. OTOH, the grill fired right up and seemed up to temp okay, so I guess it's okay now. I guess what threw me is that I've never ever had to replace a regulator before. Is this just a freak thing and it was my turn?
  4. The other night I went out to use my Kirkland Signature series grill and immediately noted something was not right. Basically I was barely getting enough gas flow to light the burners. Since it was dark and cold I left it to Saturday so I could see what I was doing. My first thought was spiders, but that didn't seem right as every burner was affected. I had a spare regulator that I had received from Nexgrill and decided to give it a try. Made the change and voila, back in business. I did notice that the replacement had a slightly larger exit orifice than the original and wondered if that may be covering up a still present problem. OTOH, the grill fired right up and seemed up to temp okay, so I guess it's okay now. I guess what threw me is that I've never ever had to replace a regulator before. Is this just a freak thing and it was my turn?
  5. 1400 Degree Portable grill

    That could be a Salamander grill for the home. Certainly a lot less expensive than the commercial version.
  6. Just an observation

    Call it cosmic coincidence but there was a period when it seemed like everybody was buying a new grill and either trying to resolve a common problem or just showing off the new hardware that seemed to drive a lot of traffic. I'm certainly guilty of some pull back, but hey, I have a new Weber kettle and I'm fired up again. Well actually I got it over the July 4 weekend. I just love this thing. All of the things that held me back for so many years are simply non-issues. It only takes 15 minutes to build a fire which is about what it takes to get the gasser hot. The fire temp is controllable and you can easily put out the coals to use next time. I have a nifty little whisk broom I use to dust the ash off the coals and down into the ash can. I don't think any of the raves about Weber products are overstated. I also have a big SS Kirkland Signature gas grill which hasn't seen much action of late due to the excellence of the Weber kettle, although I'm sure there will be times when that will be pressed into service. Just my 2¢.
  7. Kirkland 720-0193 sear thermocouple

    If you figure it out be sure to post how you did it. I need to replace mine as well but have been putting it off. Was the owner's manual any help? There's an exploded diagram in the back that might help. Frank
  8. I asked Nexgrill that question when I got my replacement burners last year and they were $40 each plus $16.00 shipping plus tax. Also, others who had bought the replacements from Nexgrill reported that they did not have the V shield under the flame tamer that deflected the burner flame. I did not re-check with them before I bought these. Frank
  9. I recently purchased the 91931 SS flame tamers and thought I would add a few comments just in case anobody else is looking for a replacement for the Nexgrill parts. In case you missed it you can buy them at: http://www.buy-it-now-store.com/kigasgrststh1.html First, Buy it Now was great, shipped the day I ordered. I put them in after a good wipe down to get the manufacturing oil off of them and did a good burn in. The perforated design works great and actually does a better job of controlling flare ups than the OEM pieces. I made chicken thighs for 6 last night and they turned out great. I can recommend these as good cost effective replacements. Frank
  10. Kirkland 720-0193 Flame Tamers

    Totally non magnetic. If they were 430 they would have some magnetic cling to them. Frank
  11. Kirkland 720-0193 Flame Tamers

    I received my new flame tamers today from BuyItNow.I was pleased to find that not only are they made from 304 stainless they also have the heat tents mounted to the underside. Material thickness is .035 or 21 gauge for the tamers themselves which is not bad but the tents are .o26 or 24 gauge which is not especially robust IMHO. We'll see how they hold up.The good part is they're not especially expensive and ship at no extra charge and no tax. Service was great. Ordered them on Thursday and the delivered in CA on Monday. Here's a bottom view of the tents And a top view, I'm anxious to try them out and will report back after I heat them up. Frank
  12. Kirkland 720-0193 Flame Tamers

    No not at all, just honest curiosity about the functionality of the product given the perforated design. As a matter of fact I just ordered a pair. Thanks for the feedback. Frank
  13. Kirkland 720-0193 Flame Tamers

    How are they with controlloing flare ups? They seem to have a lot of holes punched in them if that makes a difference. Have you ever checked them to see if they're magnetic or not? Thanks Frank
  14. Kirkland 720-0193 Flame Tamers

    The flame tamers on my Kirkland grill are 6 years old and looking pretty crusty. The bottom V piece that isn't on the factory replacements has pretty much disappeared but the tops are still serviceable, but as I said crutsy. I've been holding off paying $100 for replacements and then found these at Buy-It-Now-Store.com. http://www.buy-it-now-store.com/kigasgrststh1.html Has anybody used these and have any experience they can shar? They look good but not I'm sure about the material quality and how durable they might be. Any comments are appreciated. Thanks, Frank
  15. In search of the perfect Hotdog

    With all due respect to everybody's own personal favorite, I figured I'd go ahead and add my measly 2¢ to this even though it was mentioned in an earlier posting. It's ironic, because the best place ever and now long gone, was Pat's on Sheridan Drive in Tonawanda, NY and Ted's Hot Dogs, which was also on Sheridan but way less frequented by the populous, survived and is now THE Hot Dog King in Western NY. Louie's is a distant second. The formula was/is the same at all three places. Charcoal broiled Sahlen's wieners (natural casing) and buns toasted over the fire right next to the dogs, but there was someting about Pat's that just came out better. Must have been the way they held the forks. I think a lot of it had to do with the veil of smoke that hung over the place and filled your nostrils with the aroma of the charcoal, wieners and toasting buns. It was all outside seating weather permitting or if no tables were available the roof of your car your car was the dining table. Clearly though the best place to eat a hot dog is OUTSIDE but selling hot dogs 6 months a year is no way to run a year 'round business and Ted's had indoor seating so goodby Pat's. Condiment wise, Western New Yorkers stick with the basics. Mustard, relish or hot relish, diced onion, and dill pickle in any combination although "The Works" ( mustard, hot relish, onion and pickle) is still the favorite. I got the simple recipe for the relish 50 years ago and still make it every time we make hot dogs. Sweet relish, Tabasco and ketchup.
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