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cbow

First Roto Attempt

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Alright....I've had the S670 for a couple months now and have decided it's time to break in the roto. I picked up a 2# sirloin tip roast yesterday (just the right size for the wife and I plus leftovers for sammies), threw a little salt and pepper dry rub on it and placed it in the fridge overnight to let the magic happen. I've been reading a bit about best practices for beef roasts on the roto and the plan is to light the roto and two outside burners and try to keep the hood temp around 400*. Does that sound about right? Will use a pan for the drippings and try my hand at some gravy. Any thoughts about doing a quick sear before placing on the roto to get a nice, crispy bark? Also, I've read some conflicting reports on cook times....some say 20 min/# and others closer to 30/#. Looking for a nice rare-medium rare with crispy outside, so I plan to pull it off around 130-135*. Thoughts? Again, my first experience with the roto and I don't want to screw it up. Any help is appreciated!

 

--Chris

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Well, overall I would say the Sirloin Tip on the roto was a success! Decided not to mess with the sear burner and run the risk of over cooking the outside. That turned out to be a good decision because the roto burner performed like a champ! I put it on HI for the first 20 minutes of the cook as is suggested in the Weber manual and the bark came out just perfect! In fact it turned out so good that I didn't even get a chance to snap pics because there was some arguing over those outside pieces and I had to make sure I got some for myself! Anyway, after 20 mins with the roto burner, I turned it off and finished with just the two outside burners on medium-high. Cooked pretty perfect throughout, although next time I'll pull it off a tad sooner (maybe 130* instead of 135*). The part that was not so successful was the slicing. Knife skills have always been my Achille's Heel ( I guess I should have spent less time in front of the TV as a kid and more time playing with knives) and I had a really hard time determining which way the grain was running on this particular cut of sirloin. It was tender throughout, so I think I got a good cut across the grain, but it wasn't "pretty" (another reason for no pics). But, it doesn't have to be pretty to be delicious, and it was definitely delicious. We ended up having three for dinner instead of two, so no leftovers for sandwiches :( but the pure joy of watching my sister-in-law (a former vegan) shovel bloody meat into her mouth like it was going to run away was enough to make up for it! All in all, a good cook! I can't wait to make it again soon and perfect my technique (and snap some pictures of course)!

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Awesome, Chris! Your description is great too! Especially the part about your sister-in-law...

 

As far as the knife work, the first thing is to have really sharp knives. That takes time and practice, but keep at it. (I've heard electric knives make it easy, but that's just not my style. And serrated knives are for bread, not meat.) One suggestion I have is to determine the direction of the grain before the cook and mark it by maybe making a small starter cut to show it or insert a small marker somehow.

 

Rich

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Thanks, Rich! Yeah, I still give her hell everytime she eats my food but I am definitely glad the "vegan thing" was just a phase she went through in college. As far as the knives, we have a really nice set of JA Henckels, but none of them is really appropriate for meat carving and they haven't been sharpened in a while. I think I may just invest in a decent carving knife and keep it away from the Wifey so it doesn't get used to open packages and the like (the drawer with the box cutter is literally like 3 feet away from the knife block)! That's good advice about marking the grain before hand, I will definitely do that!

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