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wasabi999

bbqn' in the garage

17 posts in this topic

Hi, I know it is advised to never bbq in the garage.

 

I was just wondering if I was using the rotisserie for a few hours (so I won't be physically in the garage most of the time) is it ok to bbq in the garage? I would probably check every 20-30mins or so. My garage does not have a door to go indoors so it should be pretty sealed from the indoors. I would leave the garage door open.

 

The only reason why I dont want to pull the bbq on the driveway is that I am worried it will effect the bbq temperatures with the winds. I'm in Canada so it'll be pretty cold in the winters.

 

Thanks

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Hi, I know it is advised to never bbq in the garage.

 

I was just wondering if I was using the rotisserie for a few hours (so I won't be physically in the garage most of the time) is it ok to bbq in the garage? I would probably check every 20-30mins or so. My garage does not have a door to go indoors so it should be pretty sealed from the indoors. I would leave the garage door open.

 

The only reason why I dont want to pull the bbq on the driveway is that I am worried it will effect the bbq temperatures with the winds. I'm in Canada so it'll be pretty cold in the winters.

 

Thanks

wasabi999,

 

Well, this is a case where common sense should prevail. Members here would not go out on a limb to advise you that this is okay. Liability and all being what it is, it would be a foolish individual to give the nod to burning a grill fueled by a propane tank indoors. That's kinda frowned on by your homeowners insurance company, also, the local fire department might take issue with it. To say nothing of local codes and ordinances that might bar such activity. I don't personally know anyone that has ever had any sort of accident with a grill fire, but have read of many. Any fire with a grill fueled by a propane tank is a serious issue, to chance pairing up that kind of a disaster with the possibility of losing your home (and God forbid - the safety of your loved ones and/or pets) should preclude taking such a chance. That being said, I'm sure you would not be the first to gamble with these odds, I've seen much more negligent and irresponsible chances taken than a grill in a garage. I can understand your problem with the cold, but should you lose your home that small problem will take a back seat to the consequences of a grill fire out of control. Sorry I can't give you the answer you were hoping for, but again, read my lead off sentence. :(

 

Mike

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Wasabi,

 

I remember growing up in Michigan, my dad would occasionally do a little charcoal grilling in the garage during the winter. It was just charcoal for fuel and he never left the grill until all the food was off and he was sure there was nothing that would suddenly ignite. You mentioned that you would only check on it every half hour or so - even MORE reason to NOT do it in the garage. Couldn't you rig up a simple two sided windbreak using a tarp or some other material? Set it up during grilling and fold it back up when done. Just a thought - we want all of our friends here on the forum to tell us of their great grilling experiences, not disaster stories.

 

Scott

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Wasabi,

 

I remember growing up in Michigan, my dad would occasionally do a little charcoal grilling in the garage during the winter. It was just charcoal for fuel and he never left the grill until all the food was off and he was sure there was nothing that would suddenly ignite. You mentioned that you would only check on it every half hour or so - even MORE reason to NOT do it in the garage. Couldn't you rig up a simple two sided windbreak using a tarp or some other material? Set it up during grilling and fold it back up when done. Just a thought - we want all of our friends here on the forum to tell us of their great grilling experiences, not disaster stories.

 

Scott

 

Thanks for the advice. I wasn't even thinking of it igniting, but yeah you are right. I was more concerned about carbon monoxide poisoning. Yeah I have to think about how I'm going to do this as there is no way I can stand outside for a few hours watching the bbq. I may look into the tarp idea or may experiment with just leaving the bbq out in the cold and see how it effects cooking times. It's just that this will be my first time bbq'n a turkey for the family and I would hate to mess it up by not being able to get the heat high enough. But I definitely agree that consequences of a fire would make a messed up turkey quite minor. It's just that I've never seen or heard of a bbq igniting before (from other family members or friends) that's why I wasn't too concerned.

 

Thanks again guys for your help/advice..hopefully it will be a mild winter here in Canada :(

 

Tuan

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It's a pretty common thing to do for die hard grillers...I will never advise it, but if you do it minimize the damage. Make sure there's plenty of ventilation...Open all doors and window and I'd even have a box fan sucking air out of the garage out the window.

 

I would recommend getting some sort of covered porch...

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so since I know some of you bbq in the winter...although I'm not sure how cold it is in your parts...and I'm assuming you are bbqn' out in the open...how do you find the coldness/wind effect cooking times and bbqn' performance (browing on poultry etc.)

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so since I know some of you bbq in the winter...although I'm not sure how cold it is in your parts...and I'm assuming you are bbqn' out in the open...how do you find the coldness/wind effect cooking times and bbqn' performance (browing on poultry etc.)

wasabi ...

 

Welcome to the forum.

 

Let me address several of your questions.

 

If you leave the door open on your garage while using your LP grill ... there is very little chance that of creating a carbon monoxide concentration that is immediately dangerous to life and health. With the door open, there should be sufficient dilution ventilation and turbulance to maintain carbon monoxide below a dangerous level. For comparison purposes ... think how many LP torpedo heaters are used in garages.

 

The real danger of using your grill in the garage is its [potential] close proximity to combustible/flammable materials that are usually stored in a garage [gasoline, oils, paint thinner, solvents, etc]. Another potential [but highly unlikely] issue is "if" the grill malfunctions ... its in a wood enclosure.

 

how do you find the coldness/wind effect cooking times and bbqn' performance (browing on poultry etc.)

 

Coldness/wind has little effect on my grilling activities, even when the tempeatures are in the teens [other than increasing the time to preheat.]. The Weber grills are double walled [i think] ... so you shouldn't have any trouble either.

 

I have installed a 75 watt light bulb in my cylinder cabinet ... when it gets really cold, the LP vapor pressure is reduced ... the light bulb warms the LP tank, increasing the VP ... and helps get a few more BTUs to the burner.

 

BG in WV

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An acquaintance from my high school burned down his fathers house just grilling near the door of his garage. Of course in his case having a can of gasoline 5' away was the culprit, but either way I wouldn't even think of doing it.

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just get a dozen 8ft 2x4's and some firerated plywood. created 2 plywood walls with attached stands to keep them upright and type them together on the back . this wll create a windblock for you. you can even cut the plywood in half and make the walls into a V instead of flat, to create a more aerodynamic structure to lessen wind impacts.

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just get a dozen 8ft 2x4's and some firerated plywood. created 2 plywood walls with attached stands to keep them upright and type them together on the back . this wll create a windblock for you. you can even cut the plywood in half and make the walls into a V instead of flat, to create a more aerodynamic structure to lessen wind impacts.

Nova5 has a very good idea for a windbreak, I'd add just a cautionary point - be sure the windbreak is SECURELY tied to the gound. A strong, gusty wind and you might find it sailing across the yard, carrying your grill with it! :)

 

Mike

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Nova5 has a very good idea for a windbreak, I'd add just a cautionary point - be sure the windbreak is SECURELY tied to the gound. A strong, gusty wind and you might find it sailing across the yard, carrying your grill with it! :)

 

Mike

 

 

unfortuantly tieing it down makes the ugly sucker permanent. if your base is built well (and has some heavy deadweight on it) you should be good. tie the two sides together thou, this way one helps keep the other from moving. use screws or bolts so at the end of winter you can take it apart and put it away.

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unfortuantly tieing it down makes the ugly sucker permanent. if your base is built well (and has some heavy deadweight on it) you should be good. tie the two sides together thou, this way one helps keep the other from moving. use screws or bolts so at the end of winter you can take it apart and put it away.

I no longer have the pictures, but I did photograph one of our deck tables, a sixty inch diameter aluminum base with a sandstone tabletop weighing well over 200 pounds (much heavier than a wooden windbreak) without all the "sail to the wind" exposure. Normally setting about twenty feet from our pool, we came home one evening with gusty winds to find it IN THE POOL (not floating needless to say)! It wasn't too lonesome either, a couple of chairs made the trip with it! :)

 

I wasn't thinking of an ugly windbreak anyway. Perhaps some white pvc lattice type paneling dadoed inside of a nice stained cedar framework. The lattice makes an excellent windbreak, allows some air to move through it (helping for stability), yet does provide sufficient amount of wind protection. Provide a planter type base and grow ivy, which looks very attractive climbing it' way up the lattice (giving even more wind protection).I'm more inclined to build something tasteful and attractive if it's going to be part of my outdoor "oasis". Especially if it's going to be kind of a permanent functional structure - around here our winds don't take the summer off! As a cabinet maker, I tend to go overboard when doing "general" carpentry type projects! :ph34r:

 

Mike

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If it were really cold, I had great insurance, nobody was around, I wanted a new garage and everything inside of it and I wasn't thinking.... well.... I still wouldn't do it!

 

On the other hand, when we built our house in the country we had a very bad ice storm. Lost power for several days. We have a wood stove in our basement so the house stayed pretty nice. I went up to check on the neighbors. I walked into the house. Smelled GREAT! Like they were grilling steaks inside! They had the grill in the livingroom to heat the house! OMG. I asked if they wanted to just come to our house to keep warm until we got power back. They said they were fine. Hard to blame them. It smelled GREAT!!!! OK... don't try this at home... just a life experience.

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If it were really cold, I had great insurance, nobody was around, I wanted a new garage and everything inside of it and I wasn't thinking.... well.... I still wouldn't do it!

 

On the other hand, when we built our house in the country we had a very bad ice storm. Lost power for several days. We have a wood stove in our basement so the house stayed pretty nice. I went up to check on the neighbors. I walked into the house. Smelled GREAT! Like they were grilling steaks inside! They had the grill in the livingroom to heat the house! OMG. I asked if they wanted to just come to our house to keep warm until we got power back. They said they were fine. Hard to blame them. It smelled GREAT!!!! OK... don't try this at home... just a life experience.

Two words

 

Carbon Monoxide........

 

:rolleyes::rolleyes:;)

 

Mike

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Two words

 

Carbon Monoxide........

 

:rolleyes::rolleyes:;)

 

Mike

 

For a moment when I saw this thread had a new post, I thught that Wasabi was back.

 

What ever happened to him"

 

Shelly

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For a moment when I saw this thread had a new post, I thught that Wasabi was back.

 

What ever happened to him"

 

Shelly

He still peeks in now and then. Last appearance - April 8, 2009, about a month ago.

 

Mike

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Two words

 

Carbon Monoxide........

 

:rolleyes:;):P

 

Mike

 

Yeah, but it smelled GREAT :rolleyes: They are still alive, not that I'm recommending it. Ya gotta admit, it was a great story. The guy was on the volunteer fire department to boot!

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