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wasabi999

osmosis with steaks

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I've heard a couple of forum members mentioning something about salting their steaks an hr at room temp b4 hitting the grill and talking about osmosis...so I looked into it further and found the following article which details the procedure...I haven't tried it yet but will report back with results on my next steak intake :)

 

http://steamykitchen.com/blog/2007/08/28/h...i-prime-steaks/

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That's kind of a brine, although it makes no sense how it would work without using actual water in the process, here is a good article on brining and discusses osmosis also...

 

http://www.cookingforengineers.com/article/70/Brining

 

I usually salt and pepper my steaks heavily using realsalt sea salt and fresh pepper and I can say that it does produce a wonderful Maillard reaction when searing properly producing a wonderful flavor...

 

Bluesin

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I think it kinda makes sense to me...with the salt drawing out the water from the steak and since the water has no where to go but back to the steak (but now salted water)...I'll probably try this with some crushed garlic to see if it pulls the garlic flavour too...

 

its on my list todo....but I got a duck, and chicken to worry about first

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I've heard a couple of forum members mentioning something about salting their steaks an hr at room temp b4 hitting the grill and talking about osmosis...so I looked into it further and found the following article which details the procedure...I haven't tried it yet but will report back with results on my next steak intake :)

 

http://steamykitchen.com/blog/2007/08/28/h...i-prime-steaks/

 

I like the added link to the shoe-string potatoes to go with the Steak.

 

I will try this with my next steak. I do salt heavy with salt and pepper for about 30 minutes prior to grilling,

I 've never trying rinsing them off and patting them dry first. So it worth a try.

 

Thanks,

 

Hike

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I'm doing a London Broil tonight and salted it heavily, I'll let you know how it turned out...

 

Bluesin

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I'm doing a London Broil tonight and salted it heavily, I'll let you know how it turned out...

 

Bluesin

 

Don't forget to wash and dry,dry,dry it. I'm curious as to how much salt remains in the meat. I am not a heavy user of salt and wonder if this technique might taste too salty to me?

 

I guess I'll have to try it to find out for myself.

 

Shelly

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I'm doing a London Broil tonight and salted it heavily, I'll let you know how it turned out...

 

Bluesin

 

 

Did not consider using this technique on a london broil...I'm doing a flank steak tomorrow for fajitas but I'll be using a marinade overnight so won't be trying it out...I'll probably get some ribsteaks next week and try one with and without to check out the diff..but let us know how yours faired

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It didn't work at all, it was salty and the meat was tough, I think that the toughness is more related to my wife having bought a fairly bad piece of meat for the London Broil, she swears it was the best one they had, which makes me wonder what the other ones looked like...

 

Bluesin

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It didn't work at all, it was salty and the meat was tough, I think that the toughness is more related to my wife having bought a fairly bad piece of meat for the London Broil, she swears it was the best one they had, which makes me wonder what the other ones looked like...

 

Bluesin

 

One of the things that I noticed in that article was that it started out by suggesting that you put enough salt on the meat to completely cover it. Then, when you get down to the actual table of measurements it presents, it suggests 1/2-1 teaspoon of salt per side for the 1" steak. That is hardly covering the entire steak.

 

Shelly

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It didn't work at all, it was salty and the meat was tough, I think that the toughness is more related to my wife having bought a fairly bad piece of meat for the London Broil, she swears it was the best one they had, which makes me wonder what the other ones looked like...

 

Bluesin

 

 

hmm..that sucks...but at the same time...at least the osmosis worked...since I'm assuming it's salty because the salt drew out the water but the salty water went back into the steak...my concern was that the steak would not be salty at all, since your taking all the salt off and patting it dry and not salting it afterwards and relying on the osmosis for the saltiness...what salt did you use? I was going to use sea salt but after hearing about your experience, I think I will stick with kosher salt

 

lastly....I think I'm more willing to try this on a striploin/tenderloin/ribeye/tbone type steak vs a flank steak....I think the flank steak could use a nice marinade overnight to help soften it...gonna have some tonight

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It didn't work at all, it was salty and the meat was tough, I think that the toughness is more related to my wife having bought a fairly bad piece of meat for the London Broil, she swears it was the best one they had, which makes me wonder what the other ones looked like...

Bluesin ...

 

Yeh ... blame it on the wife! :rolleyes:

 

The salting technique is very similar to a Brasilian Churrasco ... I posted on this back in June ...

http://www.bbqsource-forums.com/invboard/i...ost&p=12084

 

BG in WV

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Hi, my first post here. This topic made me register.

 

I just want to say this technique does work, although I do it differently than Jadens Steam Kitchen. Instead of covering the steak like a salt lick, I use the amount of salt I want on the steak period. No table salt, sea/grey or Kosher only. As I buy pretty thick steaks, its a bit more salt than normal, but whatever level of salt you like.

 

It definitely does help with tenderizing the steak, that's for sure. Not sure which "london broil" you chose. As london broil originally is a technique, not a cut of steak, and supermarkets offer different london broils. It can either be "flank" or "top round" For this technique I would stick with the following cuts: t-bone/porter, strip, loin (all three are similar of course) ribeye. That's all I ever buy anyway. Never tried it with top sirloin.

 

If you want to see the osmosis in a timelapsed video, and have a login to Cooks Illustrated (they have a two week free trial) go here:

http://www.cooksillustrated.com/videohome....t=all#topOfPage

Then search for "The Problem with Thick-Cut Steaks"

Click on Details, then choose "Why does it matter when I salt the steaks?"

 

They have a nice video on the osmosis in action.

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Hi, my first post here. This topic made me register.

 

I just want to say this technique does work, although I do it differently than Jadens Steam Kitchen. Instead of covering the steak like a salt lick, I use the amount of salt I want on the steak period. No table salt, sea/grey or Kosher only. As I buy pretty thick steaks, its a bit more salt than normal, but whatever level of salt you like.

 

It definitely does help with tenderizing the steak, that's for sure. Not sure which "london broil" you chose. As london broil originally is a technique, not a cut of steak, and supermarkets offer different london broils. It can either be "flank" or "top round" For this technique I would stick with the following cuts: t-bone/porter, strip, loin (all three are similar of course) ribeye. That's all I ever buy anyway. Never tried it with top sirloin.

 

If you want to see the osmosis in a timelapsed video, and have a login to Cooks Illustrated (they have a two week free trial) go here:

http://www.cooksillustrated.com/videohome....t=all#topOfPage

Then search for "The Problem with Thick-Cut Steaks"

Click on Details, then choose "Why does it matter when I salt the steaks?"

 

They have a nice video on the osmosis in action.

Welcome to the forum, stick around, you'll find there are a lot of great folks here and a wealth of information readily available. Looks like you'll fit in well here! Be sure to add another post to introduce yourself, tell us what kind of equipment you use, and if possible post some pictures as well.

 

Huckleberry

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Welcome to the forum, stick around, you'll find there are a lot of great folks here and a wealth of information readily available. Looks like you'll fit in well here! Be sure to add another post to introduce yourself, tell us what kind of equipment you use, and if possible post some pictures as well.

 

Huckleberry

Will do and thanks for the Welcome, Doc!

 

Tombstone, top 3 movie of all time!

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Tombstone, top 3 movie of all time!

 

Agreed, I think the most entertaining lines in that movie all went to Doc.

 

Huck

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Agreed, I think the most entertaining lines in that movie all went to Doc.

 

Huck

Huck ...

 

Have to admit I've never seen Tombstone!! :lol:

 

BG in WV

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Don't forget to wash and dry,dry,dry it. I'm curious as to how much salt remains in the meat. I am not a heavy user of salt and wonder if this technique might taste too salty to me?

 

I guess I'll have to try it to find out for myself.

 

Shelly

 

I tried this with a couple of thick ribeyes over two days. It worked well -- a much better way of getting flavor into the meat than simple marinading.

 

An important thing to know though: I am considered my many to be a heavy salt user so your tastes may vary. But I will say that my wife -- who never uses salt -- found the taste acceptable.

 

Anyway, I used some flavors other than plain salt as a couple of websites have suggested. I started with a light dusting of Penzy's English Prime Rib Rub, added some hot paprika on top, then covered in kosher salt until it was fully covered.

 

I wrapped the steaks in plastic wrap and let them sit for an hour. Then I rinsed them and grilled them.

 

Very flavorful! I'm going to see if I can perfect the rub this summer because I'm a fan of this technique now. I also think I need to play with the timing though. Like nay brining technique, varying the time can change the amount of flavor, especially for thin cuts.

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I tried this with a couple of thick ribeyes over two days. It worked well -- a much better way of getting flavor into the meat than simple marinading.

 

An important thing to know though: I am considered my many to be a heavy salt user so your tastes may vary. But I will say that my wife -- who never uses salt -- found the taste acceptable.

 

Anyway, I used some flavors other than plain salt as a couple of websites have suggested. I started with a light dusting of Penzy's English Prime Rib Rub, added some hot paprika on top, then covered in kosher salt until it was fully covered.

 

I wrapped the steaks in plastic wrap and let them sit for an hour. Then I rinsed them and grilled them.

 

Very flavorful! I'm going to see if I can perfect the rub this summer because I'm a fan of this technique now. I also think I need to play with the timing though. Like nay brining technique, varying the time can change the amount of flavor, especially for thin cuts.

MassBBQ,

 

I've always been what I considered a purist with steaks - sea salt and pepper ONLY. But that rub sounds good for a Prime Rib, I think I just might order some and give it a whirl! But I've got to keep my ribeyes and strips naked! (hmmmmmmm - don't take those last two words out of context! :lol: )

 

Thanks for the link on the English rub! :)

Miike

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MassBBQ,

 

I've always been what I considered a purist with steaks - sea salt and pepper ONLY.

Miike

 

I'm normally with you -- when I buy a dry aged cut I use salt and barely any pepper before going on the grill.

 

But I tried this on a couple of not-so-great ribeyes from BJ's since this technique is about tenderizing and coaxing more flavor out of a bad cut of meat. I used plain salt on the first and then the rub on the second to see if the flavors were very different. I think the second definitely had more flavor so I'm willing to experiment to see if I can make cheap supermarket steak into something worth buying and eating when it's on sale.

 

I'd love to try a tenderloin or roast on the rotisserie with the Penzey's rub though.

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