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Bluesin

C5Longhorn

is it possible to convert a grill from natural gas to propane?

23 posts in this topic

I'm interested in a grill that is natural gas. Is it possible to convert natural gas grills to propane? Any downsides to doing this if possible?

 

Thanks,

 

Rick

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I'm interested in a grill that is natural gas. Is it possible to convert natural gas grills to propane? Any downsides to doing this if possible?

 

Thanks,

 

Rick

 

It is more difficult, unless that particular grill has a conversion kit specifically made for it. Main reason is that you have to reduce all the orificies, and it is very difficult to find blank or lp orificies that will fit all your valves.

 

The difficulty is in identifying the thread size of the original orifical in order to order replacement orifices. Vendor CS sales replacement valves not replacement orificices.

 

Sometimes the valves may have to be replaced also. which makes it an expensive conversion.

 

Also one mistake in drilling a hole too large is that you cannot reduce it.

 

Hike

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It is more difficult, unless that particular grill has a conversion kit specifically made for it. Main reason is that you have to reduce all the orificies, and it is very difficult to find blank or lp orificies that will fit all your valves.

 

The difficulty is in identifying the thread size of the original orifical in order to order replacement orifices. Vendor CS sales replacement valves not replacement orificices.

 

Sometimes the valves may have to be replaced also. which makes it an expensive conversion.

 

Also one mistake in drilling a hole too large is that you cannot reduce it.

 

Hike

 

Thank You Takehike66. I'm starting to realize this. After I posted this, I searched again. I realized there is alot more to it than I originally thought. I found an NG grill I was interested in at a great price, but the conversion sounds like it will be a deal breaker.

 

Appreciate the response.

 

Rick

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Wha make & model is the grill?

 

Bluesin

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I think if read the description right, that grill comes set up for propane, and the natural gas conversion kit is available separately.

Scott

 

 

Sorry, I included the wrong link. They have the same identical grill available in NG for $400 delivered. I think that is a great deal but I need LPG.

 

Rick

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Sorry, I included the wrong link. They have the same identical grill available in NG for $400 delivered. I think that is a great deal but I need LPG.

 

Rick

 

Rick -

 

Ok - maybe you could call their customer service and see if they make a kit to go the other way?

 

Scott

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Are you getting a good deal on it? One of our mods Eric D suggested a different route a while back for a Jenn-Air, and that was to install a two stage regulator and just adjust the pressure down to where it needed to be.

 

That would certainly work, additionally you could just install a good Marshall adjustabe regulator and suffice.

 

Here is the link to that,

 

http://www.bbqsource-forums.com/invboard/i...?showtopic=1188

 

The end result is that at propane PSI is that your grill will end up having more BTU output because of the larger orifices, so by having a two stage or adjustable regulator you can adjust that down to whatever you like.

 

I have an adjustable regulator on my Jenn-Air, have for years and it works just great. I installed it so I could turn down the overall pressure in the system to achieve "low and slow" cooking temps in it...

 

Bluesin

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Are you getting a good deal on it? One of our mods Eric D suggested a different route a while back for a Jenn-Air, and that was to install a two stage regulator and just adjust the pressure down to where it needed to be.

 

That would certainly work, additionally you could just install a good Marshall adjustabe regulator and suffice.

 

Here is the link to that,

 

http://www.bbqsource-forums.com/invboard/i...?showtopic=1188

 

The end result is that at propane PSI is that your grill will end up having more BTU output because of the larger orifices, so by having a two stage or adjustable regulator you can adjust that down to whatever you like.

 

I have an adjustable regulator on my Jenn-Air, have for years and it works just great. I installed it so I could turn down the overall pressure in the system to achieve "low and slow" cooking temps in it...

 

Bluesin

i just converted mine for really cheap...

Here

 

But i bought parts off ebay to do it right.

 

I had the marshall 290 and i wasnt happy with the results.

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I'm interested in a grill that is natural gas. Is it possible to convert natural gas grills to propane? Any downsides to doing this if possible?

 

Thanks,

 

Rick

 

I'm new to this forum but not to grilling. I gotta believe the biggest downside to LP would be cost. Lowe's here 'bouts exchanges tanks for $18. But then you gotta schlep tanks around and hook up full ones and unhook MT's. Running out of LP in "mid stream" is also a down side. Having a spare is a must so there's another cost. With NG none a that. Just my 2¢ worth. I intend to convert from LP to NG and can't imagine going the other way unless it was absolutely necessary and if that was the case a Weber kettle and a bag of Kingsford did well for me for 25 years. I could go back to that in a hurry. Am I rambling? :rolleyes:

Peace,

Paul

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I'm new to this forum but not to grilling. I gotta believe the biggest downside to LP would be cost. Lowe's here 'bouts exchanges tanks for $18. But then you gotta schlep tanks around and hook up full ones and unhook MT's. Running out of LP in "mid stream" is also a down side. Having a spare is a must so there's another cost. With NG none a that. Just my 2¢ worth. I intend to convert from LP to NG and can't imagine going the other way unless it was absolutely necessary and if that was the case a Weber kettle and a bag of Kingsford did well for me for 25 years. I could go back to that in a hurry. Am I rambling? B)

Peace,

Paul

 

Paul

The reason people want to convert is that right now Sams Club is clearing out there Members Mark 2007 304SS grills. They are selling them for $399. For that price people want to try a conversion

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Ive been away for a while but as some might remember I had an old stainless steel flat surface frill that was natural gas. All I did was take out the orifices, fill the holes with brass and drill new holes to a smaller size. I can't remember right now but I think it was like a #55 drill bit. It took less then ten minutes to do and it works fine.

Unless I am missing something I was told that the only difference between the two is the size of the hole in the orifice. I have been using it since last fall and had zero problems. I did not change anything and the factory regulator and controls still work.

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Ive been away for a while but as some might remember I had an old stainless steel flat surface frill that was natural gas. All I did was take out the orifices, fill the holes with brass and drill new holes to a smaller size. ......

 

That is the difficult part. How did you fill the old orifices with brass?? With a hand touch and a brass rod?????

 

HIke

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Looking for followup on conversions. I took Eric's advice on using a 7" WC regulator for LP and not changing anything to the local gas fitters, and they said "NO". They recommended silver high temp solder and drilling out to the appropriate BTU rating for LPG. I'm using this resource for the drill bit size:

 

http://www.hvacredu.net/gas-codes/module2/Gas%20Orifice%20Capacity%20Chart.pdf

 

Problem is, for my 75000BTU manifold on LPG, the charts recommend a #37 hole (2.64mm), HOWEVER this is larger than the NG holes in the existing orifices. This logic doesn't make sense, so I believe I missed a step. Is the 75000 BTU divided by the number of burners? If that's the case, the chart still doesn't match the current reality of the NG setup.

 

So what's the rule of thumb for determining orifice size to gas type and BTU rating and # of burners? What other factors are there?

 

Also regarding "fill and drill" there seems to be a few ideas floating around.

 

1. silver solder.

2. brass rods (youtube)

Or 3. buy new orifices pre-drilled and tap-n-die the old brass valve. (youtube)

 

Hoping to hear some success stories.

 

Thx

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Correct me if wrong:

 

75'000 BTU 6 burner BBQ = 12'500 per burner.

 

12322 BTU (NG) = #58 Orifice (http://www.hvacredu.net/gas-codes/module2/Gas%20Orifice%20Capacity%20Chart.pdf)

 

#58 Orifice = 1.0668mm.

 

Assuming the orifices are drilled to 1.0mm, Would this work? Consequence would be slightly less BTU - is there any else?

 

#60 or 1.0mm orifice would deliver 11176 BTU (NG).

 

It's ALOT easier (local hardware) to get a 1.0mm drill bit, compared to a #58 drill bit (eastern europe).

 

 

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First you don't say what brand/type of grill you have, next if in fact you have 6 burners it IS 75000 BTU FOR THE ENTIRE APPLIANCE NOT PER BURNER. So now you have to figure out if you're going to use a 7" EC or the required by most LP appliances 11" WC. Also many grills have different valves between their NG and LP appliances (Weber being one of them). Also the ID tag on the grill is giving you a total BTU for the appliance. If you have a side burner, rotisserie burner, etc. those burners are included in that total reading. Just saying tread carefully

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Hoods last four words in his post should be heeded.

 

Not only do some grills use different gas valves, some manufactures use an inline regulator (AOG) that you must take apart and flip for lack of correct word a "reed" for the appropriate gas being used in addition to changing orifices.

 

Additionally on some grills (AOG/Holland) they mix orifice. Holland main burner and searmate are diff. AOG main burners/side burner/rotis burner all diff sizes.

 

Bottom line know the BTU rating of each (main burners, side burner and rotis burner) for your grill.

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First you don't say what brand/type of grill you have, next if in fact you have 6 burners it IS 75000 BTU FOR THE ENTIRE APPLIANCE NOT PER BURNER. So now you have to figure out if you're going to use a 7" EC or the required by most LP appliances 11" WC. Also many grills have different valves between their NG and LP appliances (Weber being one of them). Also the ID tag on the grill is giving you a total BTU for the appliance. If you have a side burner, rotisserie burner, etc. those burners are included in that total reading. Just saying tread carefully

 

Thanks for your comments. I intend on treading very carefully, hence why I haven't jumped to any conclusions without triangulating my information with others. I will NOT be like this guy who just guessed at the orifice size and choice of material to reduce the hole: (

)

 

underthehood, it is a Weber Summit 675 (built in NG). From what I can tell it is identical to the Summit 650 (likely the same series as your summit 450), except for the manifold.

 

The regulator does have a reversible LP/NG configuration.

But failing this I will revert to an 11"WC propane regulator.

 

I will fully leak check the setup and proceed with valves on the lowest setting initially before lighting. I understand the Weber NG valves let more gas through and will be difficult to fine-tune.

 

Re: BTU rating consists of all burners and side burners. From what I can tell, this BBQ did not come with a side burner. But, would Weber rate it at 75'000 BTU to include an optional side burner?

 

Please confirm this rule of thumb: "Flame should be 1 - 1.5" high with no or very little yellow."

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