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MassBBQ

Use For Old Grill Chassis

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I had a Thermos brand stainless grill which died after several years of use. (This model was a rebranded CharBroil commercial 3-burner model.)

 

 

Basically, although the cart/chassis was made of cheap stainless, it was still in OK shape while the grill internals were turning to dust. So I decided to "repurpose" the cart into a prep table with a tile top.

 

First, my wife visited a local tile distributor and picked through the rejects and overstock pile to come up with some field, border, and accent tiles that would fit about 3'x2' (cost about $30). We laid out a pattern we liked and this became the template we used to size the top. From there I followed the steps below.

 

Step 1: remove the grill -- this was basically removing 4 screws and the gas line. One of the screws was so corroded that it took a cold chisel and a hammer to get it out, but it finally gave up.

 

Step 2: cut off the side shelves (one with the side burner). 90 seconds with a sawzall took care of this. The result is a cart with 4 posts about 28 inches high. Each post has a small notch.

 

Step 3: Took some pressure treated 2x4s and built a frame by laying 2 pieces across the notched posts (secured with 2 1/2" screws) and screwing two more to them to form a square frame. The result:

 

 

Step 4: Secure 3/4" marine plywood to the frame. I based my size on the pattern we selected. I had to cut down the width of a 1/4 sheet (2'x4') to about 24"x36".

 

 

Step 5: Secure cement backer board to the plywood.

 

Step 6: Dry-fit the tile and secure to the cement board. Since this table will be outside in in temps from 100 degrees to 0 I used a construction adhesive (PL Premium) rather than a traditional thinset cement (besides, I had a couple tubes on hand so there was no incremental cost). The completed ungrouted top:

 

 

Step 7: Grout the tile. Here again I went non-traditional and used a silicone product rather than a traditional grout. I have had success with this in the past when used in outdoor applications (as long as mold resistant silicone is used). Given the flex that could occur in the pressure treated frame and even the plywood as temperature and humidity change I figured this would prevent cracking.

 

Step 8: When complete, I wrapped the top in 1 1/2" x 1/16" thick aluminum angle (secured into the plywood from below with #10 x 3/4 flathead wood screws).

 

When done it looks like this:

 

 

Finally, it takes its place next to the grill:

 

 

The wheels come in handy as I can move this around my work area. The doors work fine, so there is good storage under the table (I dropped in a piece of leftover cement board to cover the hole in the bottom). Next steps will be some accessories like a towel bar and a shelf. The good news is that my old grill cover fits over this fine so it will get some protection from the elements.

 

This was an inexpensive project and a great way to reuse something rather than sending it to the scrap yard.

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I had a Thermos brand stainless grill which died after several years of use. (This model was a rebranded CharBroil commercial 3-burner model.)

This was an inexpensive project and a great way to reuse something rather than sending it to the scrap yard.

Massbbq,

 

That's a very unique solution to what would have been just scrap! I salute your ingenuity! I actually recycled an old post mount grill myself years ago, using the post and base for a rolling platform for a small piece of equipment in my cabinet shop. See the included photo (the smaller machine on the left). Works beautiful, and I feel good not to have scrapped the old boy!

 

 

 

Thanks for the tip! Perhaps others can join us with some more ideas on recycling these old grills instead of just filling up the landfills! :lol:

 

Mike

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I had a Thermos brand stainless grill which died after several years of use. (This model was a rebranded CharBroil commercial 3-burner model.)

.......

The wheels come in handy as I can move this around my work area. The doors work fine, so there is good storage under the table (I dropped in a piece of leftover cement board to cover the hole in the bottom). Next steps will be some accessories like a towel bar and a shelf. The good news is that my old grill cover fits over this fine so it will get some protection from the elements.

 

This was an inexpensive project and a great way to reuse something rather than sending it to the scrap yard.

Very nice "repurposing" job. The tiles your wife select lools like a great design.

 

That cart looks like it would fill the need on one of our other poster Shelly, when he was looking for a cart for his US IR portable grill. :lol::lol:

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I had a Thermos brand stainless grill which died after several years of use. (This model was a rebranded CharBroil commercial 3-burner model.)

 

 

Basically, although the cart/chassis was made of cheap stainless, it was still in OK shape while the grill internals were turning to dust. So I decided to "repurpose" the cart into a prep table with a tile top.

 

First, my wife visited a local tile distributor and picked through the rejects and overstock pile to come up with some field, border, and accent tiles that would fit about 3'x2' (cost about $30). We laid out a pattern we liked and this became the template we used to size the top. From there I followed the steps below.

 

Step 1: remove the grill -- this was basically removing 4 screws and the gas line. One of the screws was so corroded that it took a cold chisel and a hammer to get it out, but it finally gave up.

 

Step 2: cut off the side shelves (one with the side burner). 90 seconds with a sawzall took care of this. The result is a cart with 4 posts about 28 inches high. Each post has a small notch.

 

Step 3: Took some pressure treated 2x4s and built a frame by laying 2 pieces across the notched posts (secured with 2 1/2" screws) and screwing two more to them to form a square frame. The result:

 

 

Step 4: Secure 3/4" marine plywood to the frame. I based my size on the pattern we selected. I had to cut down the width of a 1/4 sheet (2'x4') to about 24"x36".

 

 

Step 5: Secure cement backer board to the plywood.

 

Step 6: Dry-fit the tile and secure to the cement board. Since this table will be outside in in temps from 100 degrees to 0 I used a construction adhesive (PL Premium) rather than a traditional thinset cement (besides, I had a couple tubes on hand so there was no incremental cost). The completed ungrouted top:

 

 

Step 7: Grout the tile. Here again I went non-traditional and used a silicone product rather than a traditional grout. I have had success with this in the past when used in outdoor applications (as long as mold resistant silicone is used). Given the flex that could occur in the pressure treated frame and even the plywood as temperature and humidity change I figured this would prevent cracking.

 

Step 8: When complete, I wrapped the top in 1 1/2" x 1/16" thick aluminum angle (secured into the plywood from below with #10 x 3/4 flathead wood screws).

 

When done it looks like this:

 

 

Finally, it takes its place next to the grill:

 

 

The wheels come in handy as I can move this around my work area. The doors work fine, so there is good storage under the table (I dropped in a piece of leftover cement board to cover the hole in the bottom). Next steps will be some accessories like a towel bar and a shelf. The good news is that my old grill cover fits over this fine so it will get some protection from the elements.

 

This was an inexpensive project and a great way to reuse something rather than sending it to the scrap yard.

MassBBQ ...

 

Very nice!

 

BG in WV

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Massbbq,

 

That's a very unique solution to what would have been just scrap! I salute your ingenuity! I actually recycled an old post mount grill myself years ago, using the post and base for a rolling platform for a small piece of equipment in my cabinet shop. See the included photo (the smaller machine on the left). Works beautiful, and I feel good not to have scrapped the old boy!

 

That's nice -- I remember those post grills. One like that would make a great grinder stand. None of my other grills remained sturdy enough when I was done with them to use completely like this. I do have a cart I made for a small propane heater which uses the tank hoop/clamp from an old grill to hold the propane tank. I'll see if I can find a picture somewhere.

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Mass - I just caught your conversion. Great idea and a great job. I keep putting off an outdoor prep area (something I sorely need) because everyone's different ideas and approaches keep me reevaluating.

 

Very cool.

 

Mike

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i pulled out the old burner and flame tamer of my old charbroil and use it for hardwood charcoal grilling. put a slightly raised stainless plate in the bottom, pile it high with hardwood scraps from my buddies cabinet shop. let it burn down and then pile in more wood until i have a nice bed of coals. throw the grate on and a fat steak and BAM a nice smokey flavored steak. best ever.

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