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First Use / Seasoning the grates...

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Well I just purchased out Weber Genesis 310 with the cast iron/porcelain grates.

 

I found this on the sticky above

 

I would burn off any shipping grease on hi heat with the lid closed for a good 20-30 minutes, even if the manufacturer didn't use any, the steel supplier did, get some bacon fat or just a pack of store bought fatty bacon throw that in an old skillet on high over a burner with the lid closed after you stop seeing smoke from the bacon pour some sticky sweet sugary BBQ sauce on top of the bacon, close the lid till that steams for a while don't let it burn add a little water as needed.........

 

From the butcher get some big chunks of bacon or pork fat freeze it, when your grill is hot before you put the meat on the grates cut a cube of the frozen fat rub it on the grates with your tongs put the meat on for a nice non stick grate with no oil running down onto the tammers flaming up and making a mess in the bottom of the grill........

 

When you heat the grill on high to brush the grates clean (before cooking) leave the lid open so you don't burn off the sweat sticky coating built up in the grill box..........

 

Then when your heating the grill to temps around 400-500 you will smell BBQ before you put the meat on the grill instead of hot metal..........

 

 

But honestly I'm not sure I understand.. the bacon needs to be in a skillet on the grill??

And to burn it off - do I do that on high?

The BBQ sauce in the skillet seems really odd to me

And I need to do the frozen bacon every time I grill or just the one time?

 

So can you reassure me that this is really what I need to do. Sorry -I feel dense on this one.

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Well I just purchased out Weber Genesis 310 with the cast iron/porcelain grates.

 

I found this on the sticky above

 

 

 

 

But honestly I'm not sure I understand.. the bacon needs to be in a skillet on the grill??

And to burn it off - do I do that on high?

The BBQ sauce in the skillet seems really odd to me

And I need to do the frozen bacon every time I grill or just the one time?

 

So can you reassure me that this is really what I need to do. Sorry -I feel dense on this one.

 

I had not read this but I personally think this is overkill.

 

I would just wash and dry the grates and any part that comes in contact with the food.

 

Preheating the grill for 20 minutes is the thing to do before each cook. Before putting any food on the grates, put a folded paper towel in a dish of oil. Using tongs, coat the hot grates with the oil, and you are ready to grill. Do this every time you grill to help prevent things from sticking.

 

The other thing to remember is if you try to turn the food before it's ready, it might stick. Wait until the food releases some before turning.

 

I also oil or Pam many of my foods to further ensure against sticking.

 

I don't believe it leaving food residue of the grates and clean them after each cook.

 

Shelly

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Well I just purchased out Weber Genesis 310 with the cast iron/porcelain grates.

 

I found this on the sticky above

 

 

 

 

1. But honestly I'm not sure I understand.. the bacon needs to be in a skillet on the grill??

2. And to burn it off - do I do that on high?

3. The BBQ sauce in the skillet seems really odd to me

4. And I need to do the frozen bacon every time I grill or just the one time?

 

So can you reassure me that this is really what I need to do. Sorry -I feel dense on this one.

Hi Deb nice grill you got there I will try and make this more clear for you :) and do it in the correct order as well

 

2. Yes you burn the new grill in on high to remove any shipping grease the manufacturer and foundry might have used, after it peaks at its hottest range let it go for about another 15 minutes.

 

1. You do this to season the cooking environment, when you fry bacon it omits a very greasy tasty steam that will stick to the inside of the grill of course you don't have to do this but this coating will make the grill smell when heated to normal grilling temps like BBQ instead of hot metal.

 

3. If you get a sticky sweet catchup based BBQ sauce and reduce it in the closed grill several times by adding more water to it as it reduces it too will omit a sticky tasty steam that will stick to the inside of the grill again when the grill is brought up to temp it will smell like your cooking pork with BBQ sauce on it before you put any meat on the grill, I do this because anything you cook in a closed environment will take on the flavor of that environment as in a smoker that seasoning becomes part of the foods taste thats why you never clean a cooking environment back to bare metal or use any chemical cleaners as you will impart it to your food, so doesn't it stand to reason that if your grill smells good just being hot rather than smelling like hot metal, your foods will taste better, you will really notice it in a delicate un seasoned fish fillet.

 

4. The frozen bacon is a technique I use instead of rubbing oil on my grates before I put food on the grill, some guys spray PAM cooking oil instead of brushing oil on the grates by brushing oil some gets on the grates but some also falls into the grill if it hits the hot flavorizer bar it will flash flame if it misses the FB it will go into the bottom of the grill and over time become rancid processed cooking oils break down faster than natural animal fats and have a lower flash point, for example you cant deep fry with EVOO because it breaks down at 350F and in my opinion tastes nasty at that temp so brushing it on a 500-600 degree grate makes no sense to me

Whereas the frozen bacon fat rubbed on the hot grate before cooking wont flash because its not dripping, the inside of the grill stays cleaner at the bottom (ever seen a grease fire in a grill it's no fun believe me) the bacon fat allows meat to release sooner from the grates than oils so if you want to turn your steak before the natural sear lets go of it, it won't stick to the grate and finally Deb..............

 

Who doesn't like the taste of Bacon ;)

 

jim

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Hi Deb nice grill you got there I will try and make this more clear for you :) and do it in the correct order as well

 

2.-

 

 

Yes you burn the new grill in on high to remove any shipping grease the manufacturer and foundry might have used, after it peaks at its hottest range let it go for about another 15 minutes.

 

1. You do this to season the cooking environment, when you fry bacon it omits a very greasy tasty steam that will stick to the inside of the grill of course you don't have to do this but this coating will make the grill smell when heated to normal grilling temps like BBQ instead of hot metal.

 

3. If you get a sticky sweet catchup based BBQ sauce and reduce it in the closed grill several times by adding more water to it as it reduces it too will omit a sticky tasty steam that will stick to the inside of the grill again when the grill is brought up to temp it will smell like your cooking pork with BBQ sauce on it before you put any meat on the grill, I do this because anything you cook in a closed environment will take on the flavor of that environment as in a smoker that seasoning becomes part of the foods taste thats why you never clean a cooking environment back to bare metal or use any chemical cleaners as you will impart it to your food, so doesn't it stand to reason that if your grill smells good just being hot rather than smelling like hot metal, your foods will taste better, you will really notice it in a delicate un seasoned fish fillet.

 

4. The frozen bacon is a technique I use instead of rubbing oil on my grates before I put food on the grill, some guys spray /*PAM cooking oil instead of brushing oil on the grates by brushing oil some gets on the grates but some also falls into the grill if it hits the hot flavorizer bar it will flash flame if it misses the FB it will go into the bottom of the grill and over time become rancid processed cooking oils break down faster than natural animal fats and have a lower flash point, for example you cant deep fry with EVOO because it breaks down at 350F and in my opinion tastes nasty at that temp so brushing it on a 500-600 degree grate makes no sense to me

Whereas the frozen bacon fat rubbed on the hot grate before cooking wont flash because its not dripping, the inside of the grill stays cleaner at the bottom (ever seen a grease fire in a grill it's no fun believe me) the bacon fat allows meat to release sooner from the grates than oils so if you want to turn your steak before the natural sear lets go of it, it won't stick to the grate and finally Deb..............

 

Who doesn't like the taste of Bacon ;)

 

jim

 

 

Got it! Thanks!! That makes sense. I'm going to print this out and give it to the hubby. So there is nothing else to do to the grates themselves like you would season a cast iron pot?

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Got it! Thanks!! That makes sense. I'm going to print this out and give it to the hubby. So there is nothing else to do to the grates themselves like you would season a cast iron pot?

If they were cast iron yep you would season them like any other cast but they are porcelain coated so nothing is going to soak into them, it would be like trying to season the toilet or bathroom sink :)

 

Keep in mind Deb you do not have to season your grill its all based on preference but if you do have oil spilled down into it do clean it out, the #1 way a grease fire starts in a grill is un burnt oil or grease in the bottom of the grill it doesn't matter if you have a 40,000 dollar grill or 400

 

In my opinion the burn in is a must if you start trapping the fine cutting/shipping oil in your grill by just turning a new grill on and throwing some burgers on it before that oils burnt off, first time you cook something indirect for a long time your foods going to taste like you cooked it in a machine shop

 

 

jim

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Hi Deb nice grill you got there I will try and make this more clear for you :lol: and do it in the correct order as well

 

2. Yes you burn the new grill in on high to remove any shipping grease the manufacturer and foundry might have used, after it peaks at its hottest range let it go for about another 15 minutes.

 

1. You do this to season the cooking environment, when you fry bacon it omits a very greasy tasty steam that will stick to the inside of the grill of course you don't have to do this but this coating will make the grill smell when heated to normal grilling temps like BBQ instead of hot metal.

 

3. If you get a sticky sweet catchup based BBQ sauce and reduce it in the closed grill several times by adding more water to it as it reduces it too will omit a sticky tasty steam that will stick to the inside of the grill again when the grill is brought up to temp it will smell like your cooking pork with BBQ sauce on it before you put any meat on the grill, I do this because anything you cook in a closed environment will take on the flavor of that environment as in a smoker that seasoning becomes part of the foods taste thats why you never clean a cooking environment back to bare metal or use any chemical cleaners as you will impart it to your food, so doesn't it stand to reason that if your grill smells good just being hot rather than smelling like hot metal, your foods will taste better, you will really notice it in a delicate un seasoned fish fillet.

 

4. The frozen bacon is a technique I use instead of rubbing oil on my grates before I put food on the grill, some guys spray PAM cooking oil instead of brushing oil on the grates by brushing oil some gets on the grates but some also falls into the grill if it hits the hot flavorizer bar it will flash flame if it misses the FB it will go into the bottom of the grill and over time become rancid processed cooking oils break down faster than natural animal fats and have a lower flash point, for example you cant deep fry with EVOO because it breaks down at 350F and in my opinion tastes nasty at that temp so brushing it on a 500-600 degree grate makes no sense to me

Whereas the frozen bacon fat rubbed on the hot grate before cooking wont flash because its not dripping, the inside of the grill stays cleaner at the bottom (ever seen a grease fire in a grill it's no fun believe me) the bacon fat allows meat to release sooner from the grates than oils so if you want to turn your steak before the natural sear lets go of it, it won't stick to the grate and finally Deb..............

 

Who doesn't like the taste of Bacon :lol:

 

jim

 

Deb, I got the same grill two months ago. I basically did the same things that jimmybob suggested (except I forgot the BBQ sauce) and I've been happy. You can do this whenever it makes you feel better. :unsure: I also really like his bacon fat chunks. Much nicer, cleaner and easier that the oil on towel bit. Rich

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this is the question that i first came on to ask that got me hooked.

 

like others have said above, specifically shelly, i just washed and dried mine. when you are ready to cook, preheat on high, oil, throw on the food and don't turn before it's ready.

 

i used to burn off after each cook and figured, why waste that fuel. i brush a bit after each use with a hot brass brush and water, then get the rest off on the next cooking. i preheat on high, brush clean, oil and throw on the food. that way i don't was as much NG

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I play around with my porcelain cooking surface on my charcoal grill by oiling the cooking surfaces each time, and then running it through the dishwasher the following day after the grill cools off. The grates come out squeaky clean every time. I use grill Pam before each use...I'm trying the pork fat method next time. Life is too short to miss out on all this fun! ;)

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I play around with my porcelain cooking surface on my charcoal grill by oiling the cooking surfaces each time, and then running it through the dishwasher the following day after the grill cools off. The grates come out squeaky clean every time. I use grill Pam before each use...I'm trying the pork fat method next time. Life is too short to miss out on all this fun! :P

Give it a shot Super bacon has to tatse better than Pam, well if its the Pam I used to date in high school maybe not ;):lol:

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Give it a shot Super bacon has to tatse better than Pam, well if its the Pam I used to date in high school maybe not :):)

 

Ooo-o. Family time! :P

 

Today I will do the sopping oil treatment since I have vegetarian friends coming over (I like Jamie Purviance's thoughts on "vegetarian". :(

 

Then I'll give the flame tamers and burners a quick clean and flame to clear the effluent. (Sorry, Shelly!) :unsure:;) Rich

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Okay - so my hubby got his new grill and has been reading this thread -thank you all! But now he has a question (I probably need to see about changing my username so we have one account LOL!)

 

So his question -on the initial burn off - is the grill open or closed?

 

It seems as if it should be closed to reach temperature, but then in the same way you burn off the BBQ sauce and bacon, so that the grill itself gets flavor-if the lid is closed isn't the grease you are burning off also flavoring the grill?

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Okay - so my hubby got his new grill and has been reading this thread -thank you all! But now he has a question (I probably need to see about changing my username so we have one account LOL!)

 

So his question -on the initial burn off - is the grill open or closed?

 

It seems as if it should be closed to reach temperature, but then in the same way you burn off the BBQ sauce and bacon, so that the grill itself gets flavor-if the lid is closed isn't the grease you are burning off also flavoring the grill?

Yes deb the initial burn off is lid closed, then after my grill is seasoned what i do is leave my lid open burners on high to heat/clean my grates, lid temp of between 6-700 hundred will burn the seasoning off, when you are lets say "grilling" real hot grates, toss steaks or what not down you want hot grate temp it doesn't matter what the hood temp is, then when you are doing longer indirect cooking with the lid closed one most often looks for temps of 350-400 ish..........now your grill is being used as an oven of sorts, you don't have the blistering heat 3"s below the grates heating them, you really need a temp gauge you can put it on your grates a 12,000 BTU burner 3 inches below a grate will get the grate blistering hot doesn't matter if there's a lid above it or not.

We have not debated this here that I know of but most guys say grill with the hood down and I agree for longer grilling times.

But have you ever been to a fancy steak house and seen a chef cooking a steak at high direct heat with a lid over it?

Or a burger joint thats using open flames have a lid?

even when they are using a flat top to cook burgers or steaks, no lid, on the other hand have you ever seen an oven without a door (well 1000f pizza oven excluded)

 

Jim

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Give it a shot Super bacon has to tatse better than Pam, well if its the Pam I used to date in high school maybe not :)B)

After last night, bacon is the taste I swear by not at. ;)

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After last night, bacon is the taste I swear by not at. :)

What if they had bacon flavored Pam ;)

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What if they had bacon flavored Pam ;)

 

High school Pam or grill spray Pam? :)

 

mikey

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Here's the season in: I waited a bit and much of the smoke is gone...but it was great for a while....thanks guys DH is feeling like he's already on a great road to grilling!!!

 

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First post. Joined after finding this thread on google. Here's my new Genesis in the middle of my "seasoning" session this evening. Heated grill and skillet for 10-15 min on high then tossed in some pig. Let it almost burn then came the sauce followed by water added occasionally over the next hour. Smelled great and drove the dog crazy, I'm sure.

 

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