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First Use / Seasoning the grates...

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Okay, this is the way to go Jim :)

 

 

 

:D

Put me down for a case :D

I'll bet when Hoover stands next to his grill it smells great causing him to want to fire it up and grill somthin ;)

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I've been a long time lurker, first time poster. Finally bit the bullet after doing a bit of research and dove into a Genesis EP-330 with SS grates. I am hoping for it to arrive tomorrow. Fingers crossed! Sorry to dig up an old thread but I've tried searching and this post keeps coming back in the search results and I didn't want to add another thread asking the same question.

 

I have to admit, I had no idea there were so much passion for grilling. At first, I was somewhat taken back by all the content and information contained in these forums. I couldn't believe nor understand why people were so into BBQ grills. After reading for a couple of days, I realized all that can be done with a grill outside of burgers and maybe a steak or two. I apologize if I came across for passing judgment. Holy crap, I am excited to get into grilling and share your passions.

 

I've owned a cheapo grill for a few years. Again, just cooked burgers, chicken and a steak here and there. Im not a virgin to grilling but never went above and beyond to take care of my cheapo grill. Now that I've joined the big boys & girls club, I want to continue to learn all about how to grill properly and the ins and outs of this art form. I also want to procure my investment for as long as possible. My first plight has been to find out how to break in, clean and treat my stainless steel grates and BBQ components, etc. I've read this post a few times and have read in a couple of other places that it is essential to break in the grill. What I am slightly confused about is the cleaning part, what to use to clean the SS grates as well as what is for break in only and what is done every time before I grill.

 

I think I've gathered that the chunks of bacon/pork fat are used every time to coat the SS grates and keep them from sticking. This works better than brushing on oil as dripping, unburnt oil can cause a flash fire. Being a firefighter, I certainly don't want to be putting out fires while I'm off duty..haha Am I understanding this correctly?

 

Breaking in, burn off on high heat for 30 mins or so to get rid of the manufacturers oils. Is it advisable to clean them first and than burn off? Than, if I'm feeling froggy, do I do the whole bacon/skillet/BBQ sauce thing for break in only or whenever I feel the taste is drifting more towards metal?

 

Cleaning before/after grilling, which is recommended and what is best on SS grates? What about for excess build up on the inside as well as drips on the outside? I've been reading about the different materials that the grill is made of but not sure where I sit with my purchase. I also do not know which type of brush is best to clean the SS grates, or anything else for that matter.

 

Im sorry for being so long winded but I'm stoked about my new purchase and getting more into BBQ grilling. After purchasing a new house, the grill was essential to entertain properly. I plan to use it as much as possible and want to become a connoisseur at this. It's a long road as I can see but I will be there eventually. Thanks for an awesome community and for spending time to help newbs like myself. I look forward to participating here and look forward to learning more from you.

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I've been a long time lurker, first time poster. Finally bit the bullet after doing a bit of research and dove into a Genesis EP-330 with SS grates. I am hoping for it to arrive tomorrow. Fingers crossed! Sorry to dig up an old thread but I've tried searching and this post keeps coming back in the search results and I didn't want to add another thread asking the same question.

 

I have to admit, I had no idea there were so much passion for grilling. At first, I was somewhat taken back by all the content and information contained in these forums. I couldn't believe nor understand why people were so into BBQ grills. After reading for a couple of days, I realized all that can be done with a grill outside of burgers and maybe a steak or two. I apologize if I came across for passing judgment. Holy crap, I am excited to get into grilling and share your passions.

 

I've owned a cheapo grill for a few years. Again, just cooked burgers, chicken and a steak here and there. Im not a virgin to grilling but never went above and beyond to take care of my cheapo grill. Now that I've joined the big boys & girls club, I want to continue to learn all about how to grill properly and the ins and outs of this art form. I also want to procure my investment for as long as possible. My first plight has been to find out how to break in, clean and treat my stainless steel grates and BBQ components, etc. I've read this post a few times and have read in a couple of other places that it is essential to break in the grill. What I am slightly confused about is the cleaning part, what to use to clean the SS grates as well as what is for break in only and what is done every time before I grill.

 

I think I've gathered that the chunks of bacon/pork fat are used every time to coat the SS grates and keep them from sticking. This works better than brushing on oil as dripping, unburnt oil can cause a flash fire. Being a firefighter, I certainly don't want to be putting out fires while I'm off duty..haha Am I understanding this correctly?

 

Breaking in, burn off on high heat for 30 mins or so to get rid of the manufacturers oils. Is it advisable to clean them first and than burn off? Than, if I'm feeling froggy, do I do the whole bacon/skillet/BBQ sauce thing for break in only or whenever I feel the taste is drifting more towards metal?

 

Cleaning before/after grilling, which is recommended and what is best on SS grates? What about for excess build up on the inside as well as drips on the outside? I've been reading about the different materials that the grill is made of but not sure where I sit with my purchase. I also do not know which type of brush is best to clean the SS grates, or anything else for that matter.

 

Im sorry for being so long winded but I'm stoked about my new purchase and getting more into BBQ grilling. After purchasing a new house, the grill was essential to entertain properly. I plan to use it as much as possible and want to become a connoisseur at this. It's a long road as I can see but I will be there eventually. Thanks for an awesome community and for spending time to help newbs like myself. I look forward to participating here and look forward to learning more from you.

Hi welcome FD, thats a peach of a grill you selected, the advice I posted on seasoning your grill is just in my opinion a good way to go, it coats the inside box, which not only helps with any future corrosion, but when lower long temps are used imparts a BBQ flavor to your food as does a well seasoned smoker, plus when your grill is off and cold it will smell like BBQ when you stand near it ;) aside from high heat grilling, lower heat with long cook times in a closed environment, the environment plays a big part on the flavor of the food, it is often discerned in the tasting of BBQ, everyone makes good BBQ, but all of that attention to detail that goes into you food distinguishes good BBQ from great BBQ.

 

It is common practice to never use a chemical to clean the inside of your grill or grates.

 

I use the rendered bacon fat and reduced BBQ sauce method in a skillet anytime I want to re-season my grill, if I close the lid on my grill and preheat it to soaring temps I then must re season it because I just burnt off all of the previous seasoning, so If I am going to grill steaks or burgers I will most often preheat my grill with the lid up, I have a large grill and the proximity of the grates to the burners is such that the grates get blistering hot regardless of if the lid is open or not, if you want to check this on your new Genny simply put a temp gauge on the grates with lid up and it will tell you, I assume you will still see 650-700 degrees there.

 

Absolutely burn off any packing or milling oils. no need to clean the grill or grates first High heat is a wonderful disinfectant B) if the inside of the grill is full of dust, blow that out before you season it, but new Webers come pristine you should not have that problem.

 

Only use a SS brush for your SS grates, if you use a standard metal brush it will leave little pieces of Iron on your grates and those little pieces will rust.

 

Cleaning the grates before or after cooking is 6 of one half dozen the other, if they were cast Iron grates it would be different, with SS some folks cook shut the grill down and brush the grates at preheat for the next cook, others right after the cook turn the grill to high and brush them. I find myself most often removing food turning to high eating then brushing the grates and then shut down, my next cook I will preheat, lightly brush my grates then rub frozen chunks of bacon fat on them to coat them in prep for the food, I find spilled wiped on cooking oils that don't hit the grates go rancid, so I use the frozen chunk method, plus frankly I like the taste of bacon. I really don't find myself taking the grates out and cleaning them per-say.

 

on your Genny do keep your drip tray clean, thats a must for the safe operation of most grills

build up on the inside of the grill is a good thing, providing of course it is not below the burners i.e. ash or grease.

 

Dont take anything abrasive to the outside of your SS, treat the chassis of your grill like you would your car, and it will last a lifetime and maintain a great appearance.

Many of the guys hear have great tips for exterior maintenance of your grill, I myself use WD-40 and wipe my grill down it is entirely SS though others with the porcelain coated panels have other methods, I am sure they will share with you.

 

Drips on the outside are best cleaned as they happen if possible, less elbow grease is involved if you catch them right away.

 

I don't know if you have LP or NG grill, good practice is to periodically do a soap test for leaks, and before your first use.

Myself I have a NG grill and always shut the gas off at the stub out on the house, others leave it on.

 

I do all the cooking and cook every meal on my grill, no matter what it is, I don't like cleaning the wife's kitchen

 

Anyhow enjoy your new grill!

 

 

Jim

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Hi welcome FD, thats a peach of a grill you selected, the advice I posted on seasoning your grill is just in my opinion a good way to go, it coats the inside box, which not only helps with any future corrosion, but when lower long temps are used imparts a BBQ flavor to your food as does a well seasoned smoker, plus when your grill is off and cold it will smell like BBQ when you stand near it ;) aside from high heat grilling, lower heat with long cook times in a closed environment, the environment plays a big part on the flavor of the food, it is often discerned in the tasting of BBQ, everyone makes good BBQ, but all of that attention to detail that goes into you food distinguishes good BBQ from great BBQ.

Jim, thanks for the warm welcome and a well thought out and detailed response. I really appreciate the time spent on this response. This should be a sticky if not already. Although I tried looking to see if there were any for beginners. No luck obviously.

 

I was trying to figure out which grates were best. I than realized that it comes down to preference in many cases. I'm not the type to spend hours trying to clean grates...lol it seems that I made the right choice to go with SS grates. I will have to read up more on what the rest of the components of the grill are made of so I can take proper care early on to preserve and keep it looking pretty. I chose the Brick Red by the way.

 

It is common practice to never use a chemical to clean the inside of your grill or grates.
Great to know. I have read that people use certain types of cleaners to clean things off. I definitely don't want to go backwards.

 

I use the rendered bacon fat and reduced BBQ sauce method in a skillet anytime I want to re-season my grill, if I close the lid on my grill and preheat it to soaring temps I then must re season it because I just burnt off all of the previous seasoning, so If I am going to grill steaks or burgers I will most often preheat my grill with the lid up, I have a large grill and the proximity of the grates to the burners is such that the grates get blistering hot regardless of if the lid is open or not, if you want to check this on your new Genny simply put a temp gauge on the grates with lid up and it will tell you, I assume you will still see 650-700 degrees there.
How exactly do I ask for this bacon fat at the butcher? :huh: Sounds like an odd request. I do plan on storing used bacon fat in the future to use it for the grate coting.

 

Only use a SS brush for your SS grates, if you use a standard metal brush it will leave little pieces of Iron on your grates and those little pieces will rust.
What type of material is a SS brush? I was at HD today looking and saw something that said stainless steel but didn't stop to actually look at the material. Would you mind sharing a pic of your grates? I'm curious to see how much you leave on your grates after cleaning them for the next grilling session.

 

on your Genny do keep your drip tray clean, thats a must for the safe operation of most grills

build up on the inside of the grill is a good thing, providing of course it is not below the burners i.e. ash or grease.

I was looking at a manual online and was wondering if the drip tray was the long tray that goes under the burners and above the propane tank (by the way, I bought the LP model) or the replaceable, rectangle "meatloaf" type tray that everything drips into?

 

Dont take anything abrasive to the outside of your SS, treat the chassis of your grill like you would your car, and it will last a lifetime and maintain a great appearance.

Many of the guys hear have great tips for exterior maintenance of your grill, I myself use WD-40 and wipe my grill down it is entirely SS though others with the porcelain coated panels have other methods, I am sure they will share with you.

This is one of my main concerns and I'm very much looking forward to hearing other techniques/methods for cleaning these components.

 

One other question about covers. I never thought about covers working against the cause of preserving a BBQ. A Weber cover came with the grill. I didn't immediately notice any vents on the cover. Should I be looking at a specific model cover? I live on Long Island in NY but I am not that close to the ocean, contrary to being on an island. I don't think the salt air is a major concern as if I were closer to the shore. I thought I scored b/c my grill came with a nice cover but after reading a few posts, I'm wondering if I need a different one.

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Jim, thanks for the warm welcome and a well thought out and detailed response. I really appreciate the time spent on this response. This should be a sticky if not already. Although I tried looking to see if there were any for beginners. No luck obviously.

 

I was trying to figure out which grates were best. I than realized that it comes down to preference in many cases. I'm not the type to spend hours trying to clean grates...lol it seems that I made the right choice to go with SS grates. I will have to read up more on what the rest of the components of the grill are made of so I can take proper care early on to preserve and keep it looking pretty. I chose the Brick Red by the way.

 

Great to know. I have read that people use certain types of cleaners to clean things off. I definitely don't want to go backwards.

 

How exactly do I ask for this bacon fat at the butcher? :huh: Sounds like an odd request. I do plan on storing used bacon fat in the future to use it for the grate coting.

 

What type of material is a SS brush? I was at HD today looking and saw something that said stainless steel but didn't stop to actually look at the material. Would you mind sharing a pic of your grates? I'm curious to see how much you leave on your grates after cleaning them for the next grilling session.

 

I was looking at a manual online and was wondering if the drip tray was the long tray that goes under the burners and above the propane tank (by the way, I bought the LP model) or the replaceable, rectangle "meatloaf" type tray that everything drips into?

 

This is one of my main concerns and I'm very much looking forward to hearing other techniques/methods for cleaning these components.

 

One other question about covers. I never thought about covers working against the cause of preserving a BBQ. A Weber cover came with the grill. I didn't immediately notice any vents on the cover. Should I be looking at a specific model cover? I live on Long Island in NY but I am not that close to the ocean, contrary to being on an island. I don't think the salt air is a major concern as if I were closer to the shore. I thought I scored b/c my grill came with a nice cover but after reading a few posts, I'm wondering if I need a different one.

I like both my SS grates and My cast Iron I do have the PCI grates but have not used them in years, Cast Iron grates need to be seasoned and stored so they don't rust, SS grates wont absorb oil and can be left in the grill.

 

The brick red is a beautiful grill again take care of its finish and it will maintain its appearance for a long time.

 

Never use anything inside your grill that you do not want to taste in your food.

 

Ask him for bacon fat he throws it in the trash, my butcher and now friend freezes it for me and calls me to pick it up, any animal fat works well too, steak trimmings, chicken fat or skin, I don't care for processed oil, natural animal fats work better and has a higher smoke point

 

A SS brush is well SS, they have them in metal, brass and SS you want a SS brush. the bristles are SS, doesn't matter what the handle is made out of

 

At the time my SS grates are clean, they are going to lose there "shine" as you use them, if you want to really clean them up, preheat the grill, brush the grates, let it cool, then flip the grates over preheat and brush again, let cool, then flip them back into the stock position.

 

yes you are correct the tray you describe is the primary tray, the little foil one is the secondary tray, on your Weber you can find the secondary disposable tray at the market in the baking isle..or I suppose you could line the secondary tray with foil and just discard the foil from time to time, in my opinion I would not line the primary tray, but just slide it out and hit it with a spatula or putty knife, you want it free of wet unburned grease, since on your genny it is effortless I would check this before each time I grilled, then when you do have a flare up there will be little to no grease in the tray to ignite, the flashes of fire coming off of your FB bars as the grease hits it is standard in any grill.

 

Covers: the night air is moist if you trap it in your grill, the sunshine will make it condensate and not dry out, that is worse for the grill than being out uncovered getting wet at night and drying out in the day. in the rain and snow a cover is nice, then when the weather breaks remove it, keep the chassis up. I used to live in Huntington Harbor California, right on the water and had a Genny never covered but cared for, never had any rust or corrosion issues, 2 things help with longevity of your Weber, 1. dont neglect it i.e. keep it clean, and 2. use it frequently, a used Weber is a happy grill, if it just sits for months on end neglected it wears out faster than if you use it everyday.

 

 

 

 

jim

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Hi Deb nice grill you got there I will try and make this more clear for you :) and do it in the correct order as well

 

2. Yes you burn the new grill in on high to remove any shipping grease the manufacturer and foundry might have used, after it peaks at its hottest range let it go for about another 15 minutes.

 

1. You do this to season the cooking environment, when you fry bacon it omits a very greasy tasty steam that will stick to the inside of the grill of course you don't have to do this but this coating will make the grill smell when heated to normal grilling temps like BBQ instead of hot metal.

 

3. If you get a sticky sweet catchup based BBQ sauce and reduce it in the closed grill several times by adding more water to it as it reduces it too will omit a sticky tasty steam that will stick to the inside of the grill again when the grill is brought up to temp it will smell like your cooking pork with BBQ sauce on it before you put any meat on the grill, I do this because anything you cook in a closed environment will take on the flavor of that environment as in a smoker that seasoning becomes part of the foods taste thats why you never clean a cooking environment back to bare metal or use any chemical cleaners as you will impart it to your food, so doesn't it stand to reason that if your grill smells good just being hot rather than smelling like hot metal, your foods will taste better, you will really notice it in a delicate un seasoned fish fillet.

 

4. The frozen bacon is a technique I use instead of rubbing oil on my grates before I put food on the grill, some guys spray PAM cooking oil instead of brushing oil on the grates by brushing oil some gets on the grates but some also falls into the grill if it hits the hot flavorizer bar it will flash flame if it misses the FB it will go into the bottom of the grill and over time become rancid processed cooking oils break down faster than natural animal fats and have a lower flash point, for example you cant deep fry with EVOO because it breaks down at 350F and in my opinion tastes nasty at that temp so brushing it on a 500-600 degree grate makes no sense to me

Whereas the frozen bacon fat rubbed on the hot grate before cooking wont flash because its not dripping, the inside of the grill stays cleaner at the bottom (ever seen a grease fire in a grill it's no fun believe me) the bacon fat allows meat to release sooner from the grates than oils so if you want to turn your steak before the natural sear lets go of it, it won't stick to the grate and finally Deb..............

 

Who doesn't like the taste of Bacon ;)

 

jim

 

 

 

Jim,

 

I have used this method, which is really awesome BTW, after purchasing the Genesis E-310. My only question is on the step where you use the fying pan and you say "Lid" on im assuming you mean the BBQ lid? You wouldn't additionally use the top to the skillet/frying pan cover as well right? I know this might seem ridiculous but I just want to make sure I did this right, as this is my first weber. (stepped into the "big boy league")

 

First time poster too, so be gentle haha!

 

Rich

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Hey, Rich -- welcome to the BBQ Source! I had to reply to your post just to congratulate you on your great moniker: "Richthesky" indeed! What does the 63 refer to (there are so many alternatives). I'm using "richlife69" for all new usernames -- '69 is the year I graduated from Carolina, but of course it has other favorable meanings...

 

In case you missed it, you actually re-vivified and old thread -- certainly worth bringing back to life. I risk answering for jimbo know that he will probably have a bit to say also -- most likely in 3 words or less. :lol: :lol: :lol: Yes, he meant the lid to the grill not the frying pan lid. Personally, I like using a cast iron pan for this purpose -- double good, seasons the grill and seasons (or re-seasons) the pan.

 

Keep in touch about your grilling adventures. More than 3 years ago, I really began my grilling life with an E-310. "Began" despite having grilled for more than 25 years. I just didn't know how much fun it could be until got a quality grill and that could help me cook well.

 

Rich

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Jim,

 

I have used this method, which is really awesome BTW, after purchasing the Genesis E-310. My only question is on the step where you use the fying pan and you say "Lid" on im assuming you mean the BBQ lid? You wouldn't additionally use the top to the skillet/frying pan cover as well right? I know this might seem ridiculous but I just want to make sure I did this right, as this is my first weber. (stepped into the "big boy league")

 

First time poster too, so be gentle haha!

 

Rich

Hi Rich yes the pan does not have a lid but you close the hood to the grill, you keep adding water (or more bbq sauce) as it reduces because you don't want to burn the sauce, and most often what I will do is when I preheat my grill to just use the grates, like burgers or dogs or what not, I leave the hood open, because (well at least on my grill) if I preheat with the lid down all 5 burners on high hood temp reaches 800F and then there goes my nice sweat bbq smelling seasoning and I have to season it again.

 

You can also put some of your favorite wood on a flavorizer bar while you're reducing the sauce and the smoke will stick to the inside as well.

 

Once its coated well the grill will smell like BBQ even when its off, and all that goo really helps with heat retention when you're cooking low and slow as well as protects the metal because the first coating (the bacon grease) is like a coat of oil, if you don't like bacon flavor, your first cook can be some 80/20 burger meat, that will put a nice coating on the inside as well.

 

 

 

Oh and welcome,

 

 

 

jim

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New Rich, +1 on what the (old Rich said ;) )

 

I always fry my bacon or sausage on the grill, its to easy to step out on the patio, (with like Rich said) cast iron skillet or griddle, rather than get the grease on the wife's precious stove top or cabinetry :o

And since your already there might as well fry the eggs and brown the taters as well, what the heck round it off with some grilled asparagus and hollandaise sauce, might as well toast some english muffins on the grates while your at it :):D

 

 

jim

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Hey, Rich -- welcome to the BBQ Source! I had to reply to your post just to congratulate you on your great moniker: "Richthesky" indeed! What does the 63 refer to (there are so many alternatives). I'm using "richlife69" for all new usernames -- '69 is the year I graduated from Carolina, but of course it has other favorable meanings...

 

In case you missed it, you actually re-vivified and old thread -- certainly worth bringing back to life. I risk answering for jimbo know that he will probably have a bit to say also -- most likely in 3 words or less. :lol: :lol: :lol: Yes, he meant the lid to the grill not the frying pan lid. Personally, I like using a cast iron pan for this purpose -- double good, seasons the grill and seasons (or re-seasons) the pan.

 

Keep in touch about your grilling adventures. More than 3 years ago, I really began my grilling life with an E-310. "Began" despite having grilled for more than 25 years. I just didn't know how much fun it could be until got a quality grill and that could help me cook well.

 

Rich

 

HAHA nice! the 63 has no real relevance other than Ive tagged "63" onto all of my monikers since I was around 15. All of our friends did, and to be honest I can't remember why. Thanks for clarifying up my issue as well!

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New Rich, +1 on what the (old Rich said ;) )

 

I always fry my bacon or sausage on the grill, its to easy to step out on the patio, (with like Rich said) cast iron skillet or griddle, rather than get the grease on the wife's precious stove top or cabinetry :o

And since your already there might as well fry the eggs and brown the taters as well, what the heck round it off with some grilled asparagus and hollandaise sauce, might as well toast some english muffins on the grates while your at it :):D

 

 

jim

 

Yeah this seems like a great breakfast idea, I might just have to do this sunday morning! Thanks again for the help, it is much appreciated. The first time I did this I used a splatter gaurd for half the time, and i was sure i was doing something wrong haha. I'll be redoing this method tomorrow ... just this time the right way, DOH!

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Yeah this seems like a great breakfast idea, I might just have to do this sunday morning! Thanks again for the help, it is much appreciated. The first time I did this I used a splatter gaurd for half the time, and i was sure i was doing something wrong haha. I'll be redoing this method tomorrow ... just this time the right way, DOH!

Good deal Rich if the weathers nice, and you have a patio table, get some paper plates and serve the wife and kids breakfast right off the grill, my wife and I love that we get to chat with our kids before they scatter off for the day and theres no mess to speak of to clean up.

 

I don't mind doing the cooking as long as its at the grill, then if theres a little spill or pot bubbling sauce I'm not wiping down kitchen appliances and loading the dish washer, I should buy stock in the paper plate and plastic cup industry :D

 

Enjoy that new grill I'm sure the more you use it the more you will want to.

 

 

jim

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Ditto Jim's last comment. When I got the Weber, I went from an occasional, in-season griller to a near every day year-round fanatic in a couple of weeks. Goaded on by the nuts here (er, interesting people), I have never looked back.

 

Rich

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I always fry my bacon or sausage on the grill, its to easy to step out on the patio, (with like Rich said) cast iron skillet or griddle, rather than get the grease on the wife's precious stove top or cabinetry :o

And since your already there might as well fry the eggs and brown the taters as well, what the heck round it off with some grilled asparagus and hollandaise sauce, might as well toast some english muffins on the grates while your at it :):D

 

 

jim

 

This sounds so good it almost brought a tear to my eye!

 

As a complete newb I want to post a thank you to everyone on these forums! You guys inspired me to go out and pick up an Weber Genesis E-310 in Espresso from Lowes on Saturday. Got it put together last night and did the burn-off this morning. I'll post pics below but first I have a couple of questions to continue this thread.

 

1. While cooking bacon, sausage, eggs, and for that matter anything that can't sit directly on the grates, what kind of pan can I use or should I look for? Will my normal inside pans with SS handles work or do I need to step up to cast iron pans?

 

2. This gril came with the PCI grates, is a normal brass brush ok to use on these grates or should I get something else?

 

3. I'm beginning to lean more to the "keep it uncovered" camp... I bought the Weber cover for it but, living in So Cal, it's usually sunny, and it's not it will be in a day or so. With that in mind what should I use to keep the exterior clean if I don't use the cover?

 

Again thank you all so much for your help! Here are a couple of shots of my new baby!

 

 

PIC 1 - JUST FINISHED THE ASSEMBLY

post-23525-0-13722200-1373389768_thumb.jpeg

 

 

 

PIC 2 - THE NEXT MORNING, DURING BURN-OFF

post-23525-0-11611700-1373389759_thumb.jpeg

 

 

 

PIC 3 - ANOTHER PIC OF THE NEW BABY!

post-23525-0-10761700-1373389774_thumb.jpeg

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This sounds so good it almost brought a tear to my eye!

 

As a complete newb I want to post a thank you to everyone on these forums! You guys inspired me to go out and pick up an Weber Genesis E-310 in Espresso from Lowes on Saturday. Got it put together last night and did the burn-off this morning. I'll post pics below but first I have a couple of questions to continue this thread.

 

1. While cooking bacon, sausage, eggs, and for that matter anything that can't sit directly on the grates, what kind of pan can I use or should I look for? Will my normal inside pans with SS handles work or do I need to step up to cast iron pans?

 

2. This gril came with the PCI grates, is a normal brass brush ok to use on these grates or should I get something else?

 

3. I'm beginning to lean more to the "keep it uncovered" camp... I bought the Weber cover for it but, living in So Cal, it's usually sunny, and it's not it will be in a day or so. With that in mind what should I use to keep the exterior clean if I don't use the cover?

 

Again thank you all so much for your help! Here are a couple of shots of my new baby!

 

 

PIC 1 - JUST FINISHED THE ASSEMBLY

post-23525-0-13722200-1373389768_thumb.jpeg

 

 

 

PIC 2 - THE NEXT MORNING, DURING BURN-OFF

post-23525-0-11611700-1373389759_thumb.jpeg

 

 

 

PIC 3 - ANOTHER PIC OF THE NEW BABY!

post-23525-0-10761700-1373389774_thumb.jpeg

Thanks Lava I try to be descriptive :)

 

I live in socal too so no cover for me, but I am under my patio cover.

1. Your SS stuff will work fine, but you can get a cast griddle or 12" frying pan pretty cheap, I'd go griddle, that way you can do burgers and pancakes like you would on a flat top, my kids like the burgers flat topped, they sizzle in the meats grease and sear all over.

 

2. Brass or SS on the brush, no metal (iron bristle) the little flakes that come of will rust on the grates.

 

3. Clean the outside like it was your car and instead of wax, use some kind of exterior protectant rust inhibitor I use WD-40, but on your porcelain stuff I guess wd would be ok just rub it in nice, so the grill doesn't become a dust magnet.

 

 

Thats a nice looking grill!!

 

 

 

jim

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Hey, Lavaweb, and welcome! Jump on in, the grillings fine!

 

I learned about keeping up my grill's exterior from Tubby's master, so -- what he said. :lol:

 

As far as covering, I live in humid (and this year incredibly WET NC) and I leave my grill uncovered. But I also have it on a covered deck (though it doesn't protect from wind-blown rain).

 

I used to have an E-310 and always used a brass brush -- pretty much the cheapest I could find. Weber says stainless is ok, but I never quite could accept scraping that porcelain with SS. My qwerk...

 

For the biggy, I say to go cast iron as soon as you can. Only the best for your grill. Break it in right and maintenance is easy. (And you may as well know that I don't believe for a minute that ANY cast iron comes "pre-seasoned".) I store mine out in the humidity and have no trouble with rust -- though understand that I rub it with canola oil after every cleaning. I have a small griddle with a pan-type handle and a 10" skillet and have never had great need for any other. (Though I have asked my 90-year-old MIL to leave me her 6" cast iron skillet -- talk about thoroughly "broken-in"! :D :D I can't think of anything better to have as a keepsake when she's gone -- a keepsake that will get regular use and be a constant reminder of her biscuits!)

 

Rich

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I learned about keeping up my grill's exterior from Tubby's master, so -- what he said. :lol:

Rich

Me too Rich I keep the cast stuff oiled and it holds up real nice.

 

Oh and Rich you do realize that Tubby is my Dog right :D

 

But in his defense he is smarter than both my teen agers put together. although his math is a little rusty

 

 

jim

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Me too Rich I keep the cast stuff oiled and it holds up real nice.

 

Oh and Rich you do realize that Tubby is my Dog right :D

 

But in his defense he is smarter than both my teen agers put together. although his math is a little rusty

 

jim

 

Yeah, I knew Tubby was the dog. My only mistake was in saying you were the master. I should know better! ;)

 

Rich

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Yeah, I knew Tubby was the dog. My only mistake was in saying you were the master. I should know better! ;)

 

Rich

As it turns out Tubby has a vast wealth of knowledge, sometimes he has a problem articulating it to me, but I'm convinced he has forgotten more than I know about grilling and smoking, if you look deeply into his (right eye) post-6248-0-90713400-1373431024_thumb.jpg you will get the sense that he is a true connoisseur of fine BBQ, if you look into both his eyes simultaneously you will surmise he is just a dog and most likely a moron :D :D :D :D

 

 

 

jimbee

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