Jump to content
NoviceinD

First Use / Seasoning the grates...

Recommended Posts

Hi Deb nice grill you got there I will try and make this more clear for you wink.gif and do it in the correct order as well

 

2. Yes you burn the new grill in on high to remove any shipping grease the manufacturer and foundry might have used, after it peaks at its hottest range let it go for about another 15 minutes.

 

1. You do this to season the cooking environment, when you fry bacon it omits a very greasy tasty steam that will stick to the inside of the grill of course you don't have to do this but this coating will make the grill smell when heated to normal grilling temps like BBQ instead of hot metal.

 

3. If you get a sticky sweet catchup based BBQ sauce and reduce it in the closed grill several times by adding more water to it as it reduces it too will omit a sticky tasty steam that will stick to the inside of the grill again when the grill is brought up to temp it will smell like your cooking pork with BBQ sauce on it before you put any meat on the grill, I do this because anything you cook in a closed environment will take on the flavor of that environment as in a smoker that seasoning becomes part of the foods taste thats why you never clean a cooking environment back to bare metal or use any chemical cleaners as you will impart it to your food, so doesn't it stand to reason that if your grill smells good just being hot rather than smelling like hot metal, your foods will taste better, you will really notice it in a delicate un seasoned fish fillet.

 

4. The frozen bacon is a technique I use instead of rubbing oil on my grates before I put food on the grill, some guys spray PAM cooking oil instead of brushing oil on the grates by brushing oil some gets on the grates but some also falls into the grill if it hits the hot flavorizer bar it will flash flame if it misses the FB it will go into the bottom of the grill and over time become rancid processed cooking oils break down faster than natural animal fats and have a lower flash point, for example you cant deep fry with EVOO because it breaks down at 350F and in my opinion tastes nasty at that temp so brushing it on a 500-600 degree grate makes no sense to me

Whereas the frozen bacon fat rubbed on the hot grate before cooking wont flash because its not dripping, the inside of the grill stays cleaner at the bottom (ever seen a grease fire in a grill it's no fun believe me) the bacon fat allows meat to release sooner from the grates than oils so if you want to turn your steak before the natural sear lets go of it, it won't stick to the grate and finally Deb..............

 

Who doesn't like the taste of Bacon wink.gif

 

jim

 

Hey if anyone is still here...?

 

Am new to all these and just wondering what you do with the bacon/bbq sauce when done? Throw it out or would it be edible? Also, I imagine it'd make a mess of the CI pan when the whole process is done, so can i use a disposable aluminum pan instead so I can just throw it out after?

 

As for the frozen bacon fat to oil the grates, are we referring to rendered bacon fat, or an actual piece of the fat? Anyone use coconut oil??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes deb the initial burn off is lid closed, then after my grill is seasoned what i do is leave my lid open burners on high to heat/clean my grates, lid temp of between 6-700 hundred will burn the seasoning off, when you are lets say "grilling" real hot grates, toss steaks or what not down you want hot grate temp it doesn't matter what the hood temp is, then when you are doing longer indirect cooking with the lid closed one most often looks for temps of 350-400 ish..........now your grill is being used as an oven of sorts, you don't have the blistering heat 3"s below the grates heating them, you really need a temp gauge you can put it on your grates a 12,000 BTU burner 3 inches below a grate will get the grate blistering hot doesn't matter if there's a lid above it or not.

We have not debated this here that I know of but most guys say grill with the hood down and I agree for longer grilling times.

But have you ever been to a fancy steak house and seen a chef cooking a steak at high direct heat with a lid over it?

Or a burger joint thats using open flames have a lid?

even when they are using a flat top to cook burgers or steaks, no lid, on the other hand have you ever seen an oven without a door (well 1000f pizza oven excluded)

 

Jim

 

And one more question! The lid open sounds logical although Weber's site emphasized to keep it closed...however, is lid open still good for winter grilling? I just got my hands on a Genesis CEP 310, am super excited and would like to grill year round!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

And one more question! The lid open sounds logical although Weber's site emphasized to keep it closed...however, is lid open still good for winter grilling? I just got my hands on a Genesis CEP 310, am super excited and would like to grill year round!

Again it matters what your grilling, if i'm doing burgers i usually have the lid up and the burners on high so I am chargrilling, like burger king lol, if you close the lid the top of the food starts cooking, if thats the desired effect close the lid.

 

 

jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Hey if anyone is still here...?

 

Am new to all these and just wondering what you do with the bacon/bbq sauce when done? Throw it out or would it be edible? Also, I imagine it'd make a mess of the CI pan when the whole process is done, so can i use a disposable aluminum pan instead so I can just throw it out after?

 

As for the frozen bacon fat to oil the grates, are we referring to rendered bacon fat, or an actual piece of the fat? Anyone use coconut oil??

No you gotta throw the pan out if its disposable or clean it with steal wool if its cast, i get actual bacon fat from the butcher, i take it rendered would mean like frozen bacon grease? naw i wouldn't recommend that, although my wife saves that grease for when she makes tamales its a little tastier than lard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Again it matters what your grilling, if i'm doing burgers i usually have the lid up and the burners on high so I am chargrilling, like burger king lol, if you close the lid the top of the food starts cooking, if thats the desired effect close the lid.

 

 

jim

 

Thanks so much for your tips! How about for steak? Would you leave lid up even during winter grilling?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No you gotta throw the pan out if its disposable or clean it with steal wool if its cast, i get actual bacon fat from the butcher, i take it rendered would mean like frozen bacon grease? naw i wouldn't recommend that, although my wife saves that grease for when she makes tamales its a little tastier than lard

 

Got it! Thanks! I found a Japanese grocer selling chunks of wagu fat for sukiyaki so I suppose this should work! And yes I keep all the bacon grease for all sorts of things too :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Thanks so much for your tips! How about for steak? Would you leave lid up even during winter grilling?

I guess that would depend on how you like your steak, i like mine just short of med rare, so i get the grates hot as i can and char each side of a 1-1.5 inch steak for a few minutes each side.

 

my family likes well done so I close the lid for theirs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Got it! Thanks! I found a Japanese grocer selling chunks of wagu fat for sukiyaki so I suppose this should work! And yes I keep all the bacon grease for all sorts of things too :)

yeah that will work sounds tasty too, ive used chicken skin in a pinch, I just try to stay with natural fat cause oils like evoo and evo break down at 350F and if my grates are 600F it kinda just burns the oil and tastes kinda nasty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends how you prepare a steak. On thick steaks there is the reverse sear method I use quite extensively especially on cuts like the ribeye which has a lot of connective tissue on the meat being so close to the chuck. So a low/slow cook, a rest and then a good sear is called for to give a perfect cook rather than the "bullseye" type of cook you'd get on thicker steaks if not used. It's a great weapon to have at your disposal. Also lid up winter grilling in some conditions is pretty much impossible no matter how powerful your grill is due to extreme cold.

My Wolf grill is an extreme power house. Putting out so much heat that if left on high just getting close to it is nearly impossible. But even that grill in our arctic climate is pretty much useless for lid up grilling much below 30 degrees F.

So it's definitely a trial and error thing. There is no shame in leaving the lid down. There is no right or wrong either. Only what you like and how well your own personal grill can perform. Now if you're using a big bed of hardwood charcoal all bets are off on this. Because with charcoal you will have radiant and infrared heat in copious amounts depending on how large a mound of fire you build.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah that will work sounds tasty too, ive used chicken skin in a pinch, I just try to stay with natural fat cause oils like evoo and evo break down at 350F and if my grates are 600F it kinda just burns the oil and tastes kinda nasty

 

Yeah I do not use EVO for anything high heat cooking...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess that would depend on how you like your steak, i like mine just short of med rare, so i get the grates hot as i can and char each side of a 1-1.5 inch steak for a few minutes each side.

 

my family likes well done so I close the lid for theirs

 

I love a well charred steak that is still med rare inside - tried a strip loin last night with lid closed cos it was quite cold and i notice the heat drop significantly each time lid was opened. And cos temp drop so fast, I did not try to oil the grates, basically just threw the steaks on and kept lid closed except for turning and flipping the steaks which I timed it every 2 mins. It was still underdone @ only 90+ at the 8 mins mark! Left them in there on indirect heat for 2 more mins and it reached 130+... I was super happy with the end result, yummy! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends how you prepare a steak. On thick steaks there is the reverse sear method I use quite extensively especially on cuts like the ribeye which has a lot of connective tissue on the meat being so close to the chuck. So a low/slow cook, a rest and then a good sear is called for to give a perfect cook rather than the "bullseye" type of cook you'd get on thicker steaks if not used. It's a great weapon to have at your disposal. Also lid up winter grilling in some conditions is pretty much impossible no matter how powerful your grill is due to extreme cold.

My Wolf grill is an extreme power house. Putting out so much heat that if left on high just getting close to it is nearly impossible. But even that grill in our arctic climate is pretty much useless for lid up grilling much below 30 degrees F.

So it's definitely a trial and error thing. There is no shame in leaving the lid down. There is no right or wrong either. Only what you like and how well your own personal grill can perform. Now if you're using a big bed of hardwood charcoal all bets are off on this. Because with charcoal you will have radiant and infrared heat in copious amounts depending on how large a mound of fire you build.

 

No charcoal, using the Genesis CEP310 on propane. Do you do the reverse sear on the grill? Or oven first, then to grill for searing? I'm new to grilling and a little nervous about controlling/maintaining the temperature of a grill. So far mostly used direct heat grilling for my steaks, they were 1.5" strips and turned out quite good. But am keen to try the reverse sear. Loving the outdoor cooking as it helps keep cooking smells out of the house!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use the grill for the whole process. I get the grill hot, grates brushed off and then lower the heat to about 250-275 internal temp. Season my steak well and insert a temp probe from a remote type thermo. I bring the steak to my desired temp (in my case about 120). Remove the steak allow to rest loosely tented under foil. In the mean time I turn the grill back to blazing inferno temps. Once it's really hot and stable (about 15 minutes) the steak goes back on for it's hard sear. Usually this only takes about 10 minutes tops. The steak can then be consumed immediately no need to rest. You'll notice the nice rosy color inside will be right out to the edge not a surrounded by a large gray band and only a small center.

This method works VERY well with cuts that have a little more fat and connective tissue i.e. ribeye is excellent. But I have used it with good results with any thick cut of steak. A thin steak (1" or less) will not take well to this and it must be the highest quality meat you can find. Be wary of supermarket meat which many times is "select" grade. IOW not much better than dog food. If you have a Costco or a good butcher shop many times you can find high choice or prime grade.

I only mentioned charcoal because having a kettle and good supply of hardwood lump when you have the time is a wonderful way of doing steaks. Using a 2 zone fire do the low/slow portion over the area of the grill with few or no coals. Keep the other side banked to a very hot fire. Charcoal will produce WAY more searing heat than a gas grill. Do the same process roast the steak, let rest, than over the very hot side for a short sear. Do not use junk charcoal (like briquettes or such) they have so many chemical binders your steak will taste like a petroleum refinery. Use only hardwood lump. You will have outstanding flavor steaks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently tried using my smoker for the low part, then hit the gasser for the high heat sear. Came out fantastic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use the grill for the whole process. I get the grill hot, grates brushed off and then lower the heat to about 250-275 internal temp. Season my steak well and insert a temp probe from a remote type thermo. I bring the steak to my desired temp (in my case about 120). Remove the steak allow to rest loosely tented under foil. In the mean time I turn the grill back to blazing inferno temps. Once it's really hot and stable (about 15 minutes) the steak goes back on for it's hard sear. Usually this only takes about 10 minutes tops. The steak can then be consumed immediately no need to rest. You'll notice the nice rosy color inside will be right out to the edge not a surrounded by a large gray band and only a small center.

This method works VERY well with cuts that have a little more fat and connective tissue i.e. ribeye is excellent. But I have used it with good results with any thick cut of steak. A thin steak (1" or less) will not take well to this and it must be the highest quality meat you can find. Be wary of supermarket meat which many times is "select" grade. IOW not much better than dog food. If you have a Costco or a good butcher shop many times you can find high choice or prime grade.

I only mentioned charcoal because having a kettle and good supply of hardwood lump when you have the time is a wonderful way of doing steaks. Using a 2 zone fire do the low/slow portion over the area of the grill with few or no coals. Keep the other side banked to a very hot fire. Charcoal will produce WAY more searing heat than a gas grill. Do the same process roast the steak, let rest, than over the very hot side for a short sear. Do not use junk charcoal (like briquettes or such) they have so many chemical binders your steak will taste like a petroleum refinery. Use only hardwood lump. You will have outstanding flavor steaks

 

Yep I get prime grade from Costco. Did a strip loin last Fri and it turned out pretty decent. Will have to try the ribeye next with what you described! Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×