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Exterior Grill Cleaning

Exterior Grill Cleaning  

35 members have voted

  1. 1. What do you use to clean the exterior of your grill? (You can select multiple items.)

    • Spray Wax
      1
    • Barkeeper's Friend (BKF)
      11
    • Noxon 7
      0
    • WD40
      12
    • Soap and water
      10
    • Vinegar and water
      0
    • Windex or other window cleaner
      3
    • A kitchen scouring cleanser
      1
    • I chose more than one of the above
      4
    • Something else (please post what and why)
      6
    • I don't clean my grill
      1
    • I use a grill cover
      18
    • I DON'T use a grill cover
      6


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This topic has come up a number of times with several alternatives suggested. I found a recommendation from Weber (below) that caused me to restart the debate. Keep in mind that most of our grill exteriors are of three primary materials: stainless steel, porcelain coated steel and cast aluminum (the Genesis firebox). These different materials may benefit from different cleaners, though most of us may use the same thing on all of them.

 

I found this comment on the Virtual Weber Bullet site which is dedicated to the porcelain coated steel Weber Smokey Mountain Cooker (smoker). The site owner has a close working relationship with Weber. "Weber does not recommend waxing the exterior of the cooker, as this can cause streaks on the finish."

 

I offer that quote because some members like to use spray wax on their grills. Keep in mind that this quote refers to the black, porcelain coated steel all of which is expected to have constant cooking temps in the 200 - 350* range (or higher at the charcoal basin end). How this would relate to stainless steel hoods or stainless tables or the cast aluminum firebox, I don't know. I personally won't use spray wax on my grill (and especially not on my wood finishes ;) ).

 

Other cleaning methods that have been recommended on the BBQ Source (the ones I remember):

 

Barkeeper's Friend or Noxon 7: These are both oxalic acid based cleansers and rely at least somewhat on the chemical action of oxalic acid.

 

WD40: Known to help cut through rust, it also cuts grease and cleans.

 

Soap and water: I don't know that anything else need be said.

 

My personal choices are WD40 and also BKF if scouring is needed. I have yet to find anything that will clean the dark grease streaks from the cast aluminum exterior, so if you can help there, please let us know.

 

Finally, notice that I also snuck in an option for "cover" or "not cover". Please answer that one also since you can select more than one item. Just deal with the grill cover question and don't bother with whether your grill itself is under some sort of patio cover.

 

Rich

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I always start with soap and water. I bought a stainless cleaner spray which is just ok, but leaves a nice shine. I like Jimbo's WD40 reco but it seems my can no longer sprays. ;)

 

I have a few scratches which will be treated with either BKF or a metal polish when I finally around to scrubbing it down. I plan to use a high temperature sealant for automobile wheels on the lower panels of my grill for some protection.

 

Cheers!

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After the grill cools down, I let my dog lick it clean. Spotless! ;):):lol:

 

Shelly

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I use regular soap and water on everything first. Once I rince and dry, I use this on my stainless steel.

 

http://www.weiman.com/products/steel/wipes.php

 

They work great.

 

I use a cover since the Winters are harsh up here in the great white north.

 

I'm actually due to clean the exterior. Maybe this weekend.

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WD40 - but I noticed that it takes off some of the writing on the grill :)

 

so - I am slowly erasing the spanish lighting instructions - the grill looks much nicer without 8 lines of black lettering

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After the grill cools down, I let my dog lick it clean. Spotless! :):lol: :lol:

 

Shelly

My German Shepard used to lick out the grease tray under the Genesis 1000. :lol::lol::lol:

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After the grill cools down, I let my dog lick it clean. Spotless! :):lol: :lol:

 

Shelly

 

If it's not giving it away, can I assume you voted "something else", Shelly? :lol::lol::lol:

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If it's not giving it away, can I assume you voted "something else", Shelly? :):lol::lol:

 

I actually use a product called Touch of Oranges, which is a wood cleaner but works perfectly on all stainless steel. Fingerprints will not show after its use. I also use it in the kitchen for all ss appliances.

 

But a dog's tongue is a mighty tool as well.

 

Shelly

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I have to admit I've only had to dump the grease tray in the bottom of my grill 2 times in 10 years since the cats always have a nice feast once the grill cools down. I don't clean my grill often but when I do, BKF seems to be my go to cleaner. Gently but very affective. Scott mentioned something he used on his ribolator grates the other night. Cascade dishwasher detergent in water. He let them soak overnight and sponged the burnt on cooking laquer off easily. Might be worth a try. I never clean the aluminum areas on my genesis. It's a grill, not a car. The grease coating protects the metal from premature corrosion... ok... it's an excuse to not clean it but hey, it works! BKF on SS is great! The inside of my grill gets scraped down and that's it. SS grates get heated and scrubbed with a ss brush. I have the plastic shelves that look like granite. The side shelves just lift off for cleaning in the sink. I also have the fold up shelves that clean by wiping off with a damp cloth.

 

I use my grill for grilling, not show. I don't take it to grill cruises or shows at the sonic on Friday nights. No concourse events... or closed grill courses! It's a grill. Made for cooking fatty steaks, chicken stathered with bbq sauce and burned onto the grates. A drip here and there gives it character between cleanings!

 

Grillingly yours

Sinko Grillo

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I have to admit I've only had to dump the grease tray in the bottom of my grill 2 times in 10 years since the cats always have a nice feast once the grill cools down. ...

I use my grill for grilling, not show. I don't take it to grill cruises or shows at the sonic on Friday nights. No concourse events... or closed grill courses! It's a grill. Made for cooking fatty steaks, chicken stathered with bbq sauce and burned onto the grates. A drip here and there gives it character between cleanings!

 

Grillingly yours

Sinko Grillo

 

Yeah I'm with you all the way, friendo sinko (how did THAT get started?!). I'm not big on cleaning my grill except for three main reasons: 1) It's new and I want to "pretend" a little longer :lol: , 2) family or friends are coming over and I don't want them to THINK they'll be poisoned :lol: , and 3) it's gotten so bad that even I'M afraid I'll be poisoned :lol: ! The only thing that really bothers me is the dark grease streaks I can't get off the cast aluminum when I clean -- sort of upsets my marginal sense of order. :lol:

 

You and Shelly both prove that pets are truly essential to our well-being -- as if we needed convincing! :) Rich

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I use wd 40 in combination with some windex if there's really a grease build up.

 

I just got to mention it here. After a couple of months of grilling I decided to find out what it would take to clean the grates besides just scraping them down with a wire brush. Brought them in the house. First, I just used a dish sponge and detergent. Got most of the particles off but not the gleaming brilliance when they were new. Then BKF was used with some progress. Finally broke out the Brillo pads to get rid of the permadirt and those stainless steel gratings were "stainless." Pristine, like the day they came from the factory. Half hour plus later, laid them back in the grill. Beautiful! That evening, had some friends by. Cooked up a few burgers and dogs and when all was done, my spotless, immaculate parallel rods were exactly how they were when I started my cleaning endeavor.

 

From now on, heat 'em up, scrape 'em down, and start cooking !! Case closed.

 

I've come to the realization, "Esthetics and Barbecuing Don't Mix!"

 

 

As an artist, that's not easy for me to say,

 

elliot

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I forgot to add one thing. Every so often, I will cut a lemon in half and when the grates are nice and hot, I will rub my grates down with the lemon. It does a great job of cleaning the grates and in no time at all you'll have a lemon that is charred and BLACK from the grease.

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Simple Green.

 

Works like a champ. Hose it down, spritz on the Simple Green, brush it with a soft scrub brush, hose it off. Clean like new.

 

I use the Simple Green Aviation formula, which doesn't corrode aluminum and use it for aircraft too. But the regular formula Simple Green works fine on the grill too and didn't have any noticeable side effects.

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I use wd 40 in combination with some windex if there's really a grease build up.

 

I just got to mention it here. After a couple of months of grilling I decided to find out what it would take to clean the grates besides just scraping them down with a wire brush. Brought them in the house. First, I just used a dish sponge and detergent. Got most of the particles off but not the gleaming brilliance when they were new. Then BKF was used with some progress. Finally broke out the Brillo pads to get rid of the permadirt and those stainless steel gratings were "stainless." Pristine, like the day they came from the factory. Half hour plus later, laid them back in the grill. Beautiful! That evening, had some friends by. Cooked up a few burgers and dogs and when all was done, my spotless, immaculate parallel rods were exactly how they were when I started my cleaning endeavor.

 

From now on, heat 'em up, scrape 'em down, and start cooking !! Case closed.

 

I've come to the realization, "Esthetics and Barbecuing Don't Mix!"

 

 

As an artist, that's not easy for me to say,

 

elliot

 

 

"From now on, heat 'em up, scrape 'em down, and start cooking !! Case closed."

 

Amen to that, brother!!!!!!!!!!!

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I found a can of Fuller (as in Fuller Brush) Stainless Steel Cleaner and tried it out on the SS surfaces of my grill. It worked very well. It leaves a nice even sheen...much better than WD-40 but cost a bit more. My wife informed me that I had to buy my own if I planned to use it up as we only get it when we travel to their outlet locations as this is her favorite cleaner for the SS appliances in the kitchen. It also took care of some scuffs on the painted sides of the lid.

Fuller Stainless Cleaner

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Hi All,

 

I have a Summit 450NG. I'm going to try the BKF or the WD40 on the exterior.

 

Does anyone really every clean the inside? Have to say, I have been grilling for about 25 years and I have only cleaned the grid a couiple times. I usually just fire it up, scrape and cook. Anyway...

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Luca,

 

I refer you to my previous post on the first page of this thread as far as cleaning the grates. Keeping it simple from now on. Even if guest are expected.

 

Not worth the effort and the preheat takes care of the sanitary conditions.

 

Be well,

 

elliot

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