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richlife

Presenting my New EP-330

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I guess I'm sorry this took so long to get out, but it IS the same day -- at least for a while.

 

The grill arrived around 10:00am and was assembled by 1:00pm. It didn't really take more than about 2 hours, but I took the time to really check the instructions and didn't hurry. Nice day, great task.

 

I met the delivery guys at the top of my driveway because there is no way for them to drive a 25 foot van down and around the tight curves of my drive. They unloaded right into my truck, I checked for damage and then unloaded my truck right onto my deck.

 

This is a little out of order, but here's the empty box sitting behind the truck so you can see the size of that thing. (A right click and "Open in a new tab" works fastest.) post-8639-0-41147400-1335930451_thumb.jpg

 

But before that, I ripped open the box and took a picture of the packed grill. Weber must put some amazing engineering into packing these things -- not wasted space and everything well protected. A corner of the box was crushed, but there wasn't a trace of damage inside. post-8639-0-17014700-1335930478_thumb.jpg

 

After unpacking all the parts, I was left with a box full of packing material. post-8639-0-42622200-1335930495_thumb.jpg

 

So here it is -- a Brick Red Weber Genesis EP-330. Part by part spread around the edges of my grill deck. Instructions and tools in hand, I got started. (BTW, it's well known but worth repeating -- if you have them use your own wrench and/or socket wrench to make assembly MUCH easier. And it helps to have a deep socket or short extender also.)

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The frame goes together pretty easily. I found out right away that they sent me 3 locking wheels.

post-8639-0-66365900-1335930600_thumb.jpg A little more work and I got the side tables and firebox on. I considered putting the scale outside as I had moved it on my E-310, but wasn't sure the tank would fit under the side burner. More on that later. post-8639-0-99477100-1335930623_thumb.jpg

 

At this point I decided to show some of the internals of the EP-330 -- especially for those who may not have seen one up close. First up is the first three burners (two main with the sear between). They appear larger in diameter than those of the older model Genesis. Also, notice that all the flame ports are the same size -- they got smaller toward the center of the old model and then bigger again at the end. (I also included a picture of my old model E-310 burners so you can see the ports. Also notice the E/W orientation.) Be sure to note the brackets below the burners that hold the heat reflectors (going L to R, one of a pair between the first two burners and one of the other pair to the right of the third). Also above the burners you can see the "A"-shaped "holders" which support the flametamers.

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(Sorry if that well-used grill was a sudden shock. :ph34r: I took pics two weeks ago for craigslist.)

 

Then I added the heat reflectors and flavorizer bars. Obviously, the flavorizers hide the burners, but you can look between them and see the plates of the reflectors.

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I was looking around to see if there was anything else of interest and noticed a steel box fronting the first three burners (two main and the sear burner between). This pic is from the back looking in on it. I'm not sure what it's for, but I think it may be a heat protector -- those burners together really put out a LOT of heat! If anyone knows of a different purpose, please let me know.

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And finally it was time to put on the grates and get a pic of all of the SS cooking parts -- main grates, "bun warmer" and side burner. post-8639-0-53215300-1335930866_thumb.jpg

 

So there you have it -- oh. No wait -- the dual layer hood. You can see the circle that supports the inside layer away from the outside porcelain hood. Look at the bottom edge and you can see the bend -- that closure is about 1/2" wide (deep?). post-8639-0-76852800-1335930882_thumb.jpg

 

I don't think ya'll really need to see yet another picture of an EP-330 -- we see so many here. But what the heck, I've subjected you to this much.

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And it wouldn't be fair for you not to see it opened up...

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Having got all that done it was time to have lunch and go through the manual. They include some really good diagrams for where to do the leak check. That was next on the task list. Then I decided there was plenty of room under the side burner and started to move the scale and gas line to the outside. Believe me, it was much easier (10 min.) on the E-310 which has a hole in the side to pass through the tank fitting. The EP-330 doesn't have space for that. I won't go into detail except to say that it can be done and if you are really determined and have an hour or so, the tank and scale go just fine outside. Here you can see the steel propane lines coming out between the firebox (does not touch) and the side as well as the line anchor. Also notice there is plenty of space. post-8639-0-54785100-1335931030_thumb.jpg

 

And the finished grill as I want it. This allows me to shut off the gas after grilling without getting burnt on the drip pan as well as giving me more storage under the grill. You can also see hanging over the rail to the left, the cover that will almost never get used. On the right is the accessory table I put in because my E-310 had knobs on the table instead of space. This will come in handy now because it right next to the side burner.

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After that it was crank it up (all four burners) to burn off the manufacturing residues (never, never use a grill without burning that stuff off -- unbelievable how much noxious smoke came out of that thing). While doing this, I recorded times to temps -- WOW! 400* in 2 minutes, 500* in 4 minutes, 600* in 8 minutes! Really! After that I was disappointed it didn't get to 700* in 16 minutes, but the temp maxed at 675* and held that from 20 to 25 minutes. Then I left the grill closed and turned off the sear burner. Within 10 minutes the temp dropped to 625* which I would say is the highest temp with just the tree main burners.

 

Continuing my testing, I put in a cast iron skillet with 4 slices of bacon to season the grill (not necessary, but smells nice :), huh jimbo? To do this, I left the sear burner off and turned all the main burners down to LOW. This time in 10 minutes, the temp went down to 425*. So now I have a starting point for cooking.

 

Once Sheila got back and I had some cold brew, I put on some stuffed chilies and some burgers. The chilies started on the "bun warmer" (what a stupid name!) using the two outside burners. When they were almost ready, I turned off the right burner, moved the chilies down over that burner and turned on the two left burners and sear burner. The burgers went on for a searing cook and in a few minutes I got this pic. Notice the flame in the searing section. This got my flametamers glowing a cherry red -- something that NEVER happened with the E-310. post-8639-0-32463200-1335931083_thumb.jpg

 

Those burgers came out a perfect medium and I can't wait to learn how to cook something else! And it really is clear that I will need to learn -- this 330 cooks very differently than my old E-310.

 

I have some more observations, but I'll wait to post those tomorrow. Oh, it's tomorrow already!

 

Rich

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Rich, glad I was still up for the unveiling! It's after one in the morning here on the Jersey Shore.. Looks as good as I thought it would - if I chose a Weber, I originally thought I'd want the SS, but I have to say that Brick Red is killer! :) Those cherry red flame tamers are what I'm used to on my grill - anytime I turn my burners onto "high" the tamers glow! Probably not good for longevity though.. I don't usually need to dial up the "high" that often. Probably you won't either.

 

The searing burner is exactly the same as the two on either side of it? So, essentially they call it a sear because it has two bordering burners located very close to them? Or is it a larger BTU rated burner? In the pix it appears exactly the same as the others.

 

So, it all looks great! Gotta admit - I just LOVE the color!

 

And now, I've got to get to bed - 5:30 rising for me for a 6:15 appointment with my electrician and client. Sigh.. I wanna stay up and think grilling! :D

 

mike

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Great job Rich

Dont forget to do a burn off of your side burner

I will be curious as to how often you actually use it?

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.

.

PROUD PAPA!!

Rich, use it in the best of health

 

elliot

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Great job Rich

Dont forget to do a burn off of your side burner

I will be curious as to how often you actually use it?

 

Thanks, Ronald. And HUGE thanks for the side burner comment -- I totally forgot it! I actually expect to get some good use from it. For one thing, someone (you?) suggested using it to light my chimney. But for food, I like the idea of doing sauces, there are some things that I fix in a skillet on the grill (like frittas) that will be more efficient on the side burner, and I'm still looking for a good way to heat corn tortillas. But I will let you know how I ACTUALLY use it.

 

And Mike, you're right that sear burner look exactly like the others, but it's only rated at 10K btus where the others are 38K/3 (12.7?) btus. I'm not sure how the 3 would be divided up.

 

And then there's the question of why Weber suggests turning off the right-most burner when using the sear burner. Is the some sort of conservation of efficiency involved?

 

Rich

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Great pics and write up Rich! Congrats on your new grill!!

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Rich, reference to Weber asking you to leave the right burner off when searing - not sure - but maybe they want to keep the volume up on the searing burner. I have to say - I've never noticed any apparent diminishing flame on my ceramic burner when using any of my 4 main burners at the same time. Perhaps one of our other Weber aficionados might chip in here? I'd say experiment and see if you see any loss of performance while burning all four at the same time. They do say to use all 3 left burners together for searing, correct?

 

mike

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Well, more awake now, here are those "observations" I promised you. If anyone has any questions, I try to get answers (even if you already have your own 330). Or you can answer my questions...

 

I've read the the initial temps may be a little higher because of all the reflective surfaces. If so, that won't last long. :P Even so, this grill clearly outperforms my older model E-310 by at least a hundred degrees on all of the various settings. One trick will be to try to get a LOW temp -- best I could do on the E-310 was about 250 and still keep smoke going (wood chunks).

 

And speaking of wood chunks, another question is where to put them. I hardly think the searing area is a good spot :huh: . Somewhere around the right burner so that will influence how the smoke distributes. I'll definitely need the wood stove gasket (I'll get that today along with a few other things like a SS brush). I think I need that flat cookie sheet, jimbo.

 

Talking SS brush, reminds me that I really like how these SS grates cook. That was one uncertainty for me never having had them -- I like the PCI grates of my last to grill a lot. So one cook does not determine goodness, but with that done I think I may prefer the SS.

 

Something else I really like on this grill is that there are no slots (cutouts) in the tables. They are going to be so much easier to clean -- one smooth expanse of stainless.

 

And incidentally, during the assembly it should be noted that now the side tables are one pre-assembled piece instead of 4 or 5 separate components. THAT sure mad it easier.

 

Today I took a magnet to all the SS on the 330. It stuck to every surface except the main grates and the side burner grate. Even the bun warmer had a slight attractions. So it I'm remembering right, only those main grates are 304 stainless. The other is something else (I think I read som 400 grade stainless).

 

The 330 appears to have the same gaps all around (3/4" in back, 1/8" sides and front) as the older model. So that's a Genesis design that has held. (As I said, wood stove gasket. I still have the Dow Corning 736 Heat Resistant Sealant -- remove the nozzle, break off the solid "nose" and the adhesive in the tube is still good.)

 

This morning I noticed a screw in that little SS box mounted inside in the searing station, so I decided to take it off and see what was in there -- nothing. It is definitely a heat sheild protecting the front from the high temps generated.

 

There are some things that look new to me, but I'm not sure -- or they may have always been a difference between the "E" series and the "EP" and "S" series. The side walls have two impressed ribs running from top to bottom for stiffening. I don't remember that on the older E-310. The side definitely does not "bulge" or "sag" now with the weight of the propane tank on it.

 

Also, as shown in the OP pic, the main propane lines are ringed metal (forgot the term) so they won't crease or break. There is a mount on the side to transition from the metal to the rubber hose that goes to the tank. These things definitely were not there on the older E-310.

 

And I really have to comment on how much better this grill looks than the older side mounted control models. Generally cleaner lines, but also more expanses of the stainless "trim" of the front and tables. It's very similar but truly a better looking grill. (And, yeah, I am enamored of it -- so long old friend E-310. You've been replaced!)

 

The Brick Red color is really nice and I'm glad I chose it (sort of between what I know of as a brick red and a burgundy). But I can say that to me the Copper and the Green (what I consider Forest Green) are on a par. I didn't care for the Steel Grey, though as you can see from Steamboat's pics, that's one fine looking grill also. And I personally came to not really like the black hulk sitting on my deck -- a touch depressing. But fortunately, we're all different and there IS a choice.

 

I also happened to notice that in the little recipe booklet Weber includes, they still have the same diagram of the E/W config burners. Hmmm...

 

Oh, and I'm glad I took those pics right away -- the grill certainly isn't clean and new looking after the procedure I put it through. B)

 

Rich

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Rich, reference to Weber asking you to leave the right burner off when searing - not sure - but maybe they want to keep the volume up on the searing burner. I have to say - I've never noticed any apparent diminishing flame on my ceramic burner when using any of my 4 main burners at the same time. Perhaps one of our other Weber aficionados might chip in here? I'd say experiment and see if you see any loss of performance while burning all four at the same time. They do say to use all 3 left burners together for searing, correct?

 

mike

 

Mike, I couldn't see any diminishing of the heating of individual burners with all four running versus only three (any three). And the grill is overall definitely at least 50* hotter with all four rather than just the main three. Yes, Weber says use the two left burners and the sear burner for searing. And THAT is a LOT hotter concentration of heat that say the three mains. I'll take a look at what the thermometer says with the three mains versus the three searing station burners going. I don't have anything that could measure the temp at grill level. (Even the new Maverick ET-732 isn't rated for that high.)

 

BTW, the side burner is a separate gas line coming off the manifold (under the front panel). It's not a "wye" off the gas line to the grill. I don't know if this has always been the case or if it's new to the 2011 models.

 

Rich

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Great write-up, Rich! Lots of great insight from an "old" 310 owner. A couple observations:

 

My 2011 330 doesn't have that sear burner heat shield. That looks like it's new for 2012. I have noticed the top of the front panel does get a bit toasty with prolonged high burns. I'd be interested to see if that's what they're trying to solve there.

 

Also, you asked where to put wood, and I put mine in a foil pack right between the left and sear burners. The lower BTU of the sear burner allows for some nice temperature control when used in conjunction with the left main burner... which leads me to my next point:

 

The searing burner is exactly the same as the two on either side of it? So, essentially they call it a sear because it has two bordering burners located very close to them? Or is it a larger BTU rated burner? In the pix it appears exactly the same as the others.

 

The sear burner is 10,000 BTU versus 13,000 (I think?) for the main burners. It doesn't have a full-range control. Just high and low markings on a small dial, though there are somewhat useable in-betweens.

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Nice post Rich. It's so clean and pretty looking.

 

Now put that tank back inside. You ruined the nice smooth look! :D :D

 

Have fun cooking and comparing it. :D

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Rich, is this a 2011 or 2012? If it was marked 2011, I'm calling to see if I can get that sear heat deflector.

 

Also, regarding sauces on the side burner... that thing doesn't really do a slow simmer too well in my experience. Think more "fast water boiler" :P

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A small tidbit I learned using my sideburner. As Dave mentioned - most of the standard side burners are really TOO hot (at the lowest setting) to utilize for simmering. What I've done on mine is to reverse my grate over the burner - it holds my pots and pans up about an 1-1/2" or so higher, which helps a lot for simmering or lower heat. I fry a lot of potatoes and found this to be the only remedy. Works great now for heating bbq sauce, soups, stews, etc.

 

Not sure about the grate on the Weber, but anything you can do to raise your pot or pan higher will help.

 

mike

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Nice write up Rich, that red sure does look good, I like the mod of getting the tank out of the cabinet, if only just for safeties sake in case of a leak, not to mention the extra storage you created.

The full, half and quarter sized baking sheets I commandeered from my wife years ago have been a god send for me and my grill, if for only to put under my raised rack when I bake, I'm not cooking my pizza or casserole from the bottom up and yeah shoving one tight into the far right back and side of your grill will help direct the smoke so it at least hits the meat on it's way out the grill, as you know its a far cry from smoking but hey thats what your WSM is for ;) If you were to get serious about imparting smoke flavor in your grill (I noticed your grates are two piece) I would be tempted to cut that right grate in half at the cross bars and drop a shallow throw away tin pan over that right burner with my wood chunks and slide a sheet tray into the right corner, so I could then easily add wood to the pan and it wont effect the stability of the grate, with the way they sit on the lip of the box they could be in 4" sections and it wouldn't matter.

 

Glad to hear you seasoned it first, most of you all think I'm nuts for doing that :D But just last I night I made ribs and the back of the house was open and my daughter said to my wife "yumm I smell BBQ, what's for dinner" and my wife said to her "I don't know, thats just your dad warming up his grill" :rolleyes:

 

Just because it's 400 series stainless does not mean it destined for the rust pile, the gauge and what series 400 it is plays a big part, as well as your maintenance, plus you have a great warranty so I wouldn't give that much thought, if it has a proper finish i.e paint, porcelain it will be fine, my cars not 304 SS and its holding up :) In my opinion if your going for a bare finish, (brushed or polished) the 304 series is the way to go.

 

After you have had some time with it, I'm going to be curious as to your thoughts on its versatility over your 310.

 

I agree with Mike I think the basic premise of the "sear" burner is they just put a secondary burner in between your left and center burners, on its own the sear burner would be weak, but combined with the adjacent two makes for a nice hot section.

 

Sounds like the gap for heat escape is about the same, I know when you mentioned closing off the back you had a bit of an implosion of sorts, did the side casket bring the heat up in the 310? My Ducane is kinda of a weird design the gap in my hood is at the very top of the hood and it's a two inch gap so I was able to get a piece of L metal and use that to close the gap a little or completely and don't experience an implosion (I guess my rotto holes provide enough air), but as I have mentioned before since the gap is at the top of the hood rather than at the bottom my "Bun Warmer" was a shelf on which anything I put there was incinerated :)

 

Looking forward to further commentary on your new 330, congrats again,

 

 

jimbo

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A small tidbit I learned using my sideburner. As Dave mentioned - most of the standard side burners are really TOO hot (at the lowest setting) to utilize for simmering. What I've done on mine is to reverse my grate over the burner - it holds my pots and pans up about an 1-1/2" or so higher, which helps a lot for simmering or lower heat. I fry a lot of potatoes and found this to be the only remedy. Works great now for heating bbq sauce, soups, stews, etc.

 

Not sure about the grate on the Weber, but anything you can do to raise your pot or pan higher will help.

 

mike

+1 Mikey, here it is again wait for it.................................that pesky small sheet tray or larger skillet over the burner, then put your sauce pan on that, it will keep the heat down some and keep sauces and what not from sticking to the bottom or burning, or if you have one of those fancy sauce pans that the bottoms a half inch thick.

 

Never thought to just elevate my rack, thats a good tip

 

I think Rich might have a problem with a large sauce pan since that knob and push button are right there with the burner, those would have went better on the front panel with the burner knobs.

 

 

jim

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Yes Jim - my grate is an inverted grate - this to enable the hinged cover to come down flat. Perhaps they meant for it to be reversed when using for simmering - not sure, but it's perfect. Just flip it over - simmer away! When done, flip it upside down, close the lid and all is well.

 

As to sauces, I don't usually have them dripping over the top edges of my saute and frying pans, or the pots I simmer in. You calling me a slob? :lol: Hmmm. Perhaps THAT'S why Patty kicked me out of the kitchen and forced me into cooking outside!B)

 

Is Rich's knob really that close to the burner? My largest frying pan is 14" in diameter - I'd think that size should clear - can't tell for sure from his photo exactly how much room there is. Now some of Patty's stock pots would for sure be a problem! Then again - they'd probably tip the whole grill over if placed on a side shelf. I'm talking restaurant size for a 150 seating dining room... :P

 

mike

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As to sauces, I don't usually have them dripping over the top edges of my saute and frying pans, or the pots I simmer in. You calling me a slob? :lol: Hmmm. Perhaps THAT'S why Patty kicked me out of the kitchen and forced me into cooking outside!B)

 

Is Rich's knob really that close to the burner? My largest frying pan is 14" in diameter - I'd think that size should clear - can't tell for sure from his photo exactly how much room there is. Now some of Patty's stock pots would for sure be a problem! Then again - they'd probably tip the whole grill over if placed on a side shelf. I'm talking restaurant size for a 150 seating dining room... :P

 

mike

Mikey where did you get sauce dripping over the top of the pan ;) we need to get you some decaf :D :D :D :D

 

I was saying if your burner runs hot or your pans are thin if you put a larger pot or tray under it, the to hot burner (even on low) wont burn your sauce, gumbo, chile, baked beans and what not.

 

I use a big stock pot, (the wife wont allow me access to the good stuff) and its paper thin so even on the range in the house I have to put something under it.

 

That was one of the reasons I picked my Ducane over the 670 I was looking at, to large a pot would be to close to the knob and the side shelf was a bolt on so heavy pots wouldn't be good, I think at the time weber said 18 pound max on the burner shelf, hell my cast iron dutch oven empty weighs 20 pounds.

 

The way the ducane is set up I can sit on the burners if I want to :D :D

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Jimbo - GULP! Yea, gimme some o' dat der decaf! I did misread - I read your post too quickly and took it to mean liquids got so hot they bubbled over and messed around the burner. Don't ask me how I got that - I've just re-read your post and am now sittin' here scratching my head...:wacko: Not the caffeine - just a lack of sleep!

 

Now, just so I can clarify the last sentence of your most recent post - are you implying you have a, well, shall we say "abundant amount of insulation" in your arse - so it doesn't burn you? B) B) B)

 

Okay - I'm gonna leave work, grab a bite for dinner and get me some shut eye! Then, maybe come back here later a bit more cognizant and alert - maybe even understand some stuff correctly! :)

 

 

A sheepish and properly admonished mikey

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