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yooper829

Rub recipes for smoking a pork shoulder

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Going to attempt a pork shoulder on my performer Monday, and was thinking about the rub verses non rub method. Last time I didn't rub just seasoned it a little and it really turned out good. This time I'm thinking of a dry rub a day before, and it seems paprika is one of the main ingredients. Is there any benefits to a smoked paprika? Or is just regular the way to go? That and brown sugar along with some spices seem to be the norm....anything else I should look for? And lastly what wood seems to be the best? Now I know that's subjective to personal taste but I'm sure there are woods one shouldn't use, and I dont remember what I used last time. Looking for more of a sweetness than a bitterness. I've read the whole pulled pork section here and I think I'm ready other than these last few questions. Happy Memorial Day everyone!

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I've taken to pretty much using nothing but lemon pepper on pork. Its listed as one of the primary flavor compliments for pork in the flavor bible and it does not disappoint at all. If you or anyone else has never tried it then I'd recommend it for sure...

 

 

 

 

 

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Interesting! Would you use it as a dry rub...or after its pulled to season? Or both!! laugh.gif

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Dry rub and then I sprinkle it over the pork after I pull it. If you do it after you taste it you'll go holy crap why have I not done this before:>)

 

 

 

 

 

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Hey, yooper! Sounds like fun for Monday! B) I actually like a cajun dry rub for pork shoulder. I tend to mix my own now, but for the shoulder I would always include brown sugar in the mix (not always found in cajun rubs). I have yet to use a smoked paprika (though now in my inventory), so I really can't comment, but if you're going to smoke, I'd suggest using regular paprika so you can be sure you understand the smoky flavor and aroma. Personally, while oak is my general favorite wood for smoking, cherry is my pick for pork (and if I was limited to one wood for life, it would be cherry).

 

I also wouldn't argue with Dave's choice and I'll use it on one of the two Boston butts in my freezer. Dry rub all the way. I think a wet rub or sauce isn't especially useful for a really fatty meat like pork shoulder. Just me, not being critical.

 

Rich

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I stole this from another website:

 

Yield. Makes about 3 cups.

 

Ingredients

3/4 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar

3/4 cup white sugar

1/2 cup paprika

1/4 cup kosher salt

1/4 cup garlic powder

2 tablespoons ground black pepper

2 tablespoons ground ginger powder

2 tablespoons onion powder

2 teaspoons rosemary powder

 

rub on, wrap meat in plastic, and leave on for at least 1 hr.

 

You can finely grind up dried rosemary as a substitute. do *not* skip the ginger powder.

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I use the McKormicks pork rub for the Boston Butts. I put it on the day before, wrap it up in saran wrap and let it sit in the fridge overnight.

post-7993-0-84928200-1338205504_thumb.jpg

 

The result after 8 hours of smoking:

post-7993-0-45545600-1338205539_thumb.jpg

 

And finally, the finished product:

post-7993-0-41272100-1338205592_thumb.jpg

 

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Well my butt is on the grill! Had a tough time getting my temps under 300, so finally removed half the lit charcoal from the baskets and that's working. Rubbed with brown sugar, paprika, black and white pepper, chile powder, garlic powder and some kosher salt overnight, now low and slow with apple wood. I'm thinking of a 4 hour smoke then foiling and into the oven to finish. Pics to follow as it progresses!

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put a pan of water over the heat and that will drop the temps a bit. There is debate as to whether adding moisture to the environment does anything, but it definitely will lower the temp / make it easier to control.

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oh, if you're planning on a full 4 hours of smoke, that may be too much. You'll know when you're done :-)

 

I only do about 2hrs of smoke and then do the whole thing on the grill. Too much smoke will ruin it. YMMV :)

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Thanks Matt! That's about what I did...2 hours of smoke and going to just keep adding charcoal until 4 hours, the wrap in foil and continue. I'm also using the water pan method this time, indirect charcoal on either side with a water pan in the center. Do you increase the heat to 300-325 after smoking?? Trying to decide on whether to continue on the grill or move to the oven at 4 hours...At about 3 hours in I'm at 155 degrees according to my thermo. Sounds right on track to me!

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heres some grill porn as to my progress sofar!

 

post-7665-0-29772300-1338225335_thumb.jpg

 

post-7665-0-78077300-1338225336_thumb.jpg

 

post-7665-0-45117500-1338225333_thumb.jpg

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Thanks Matt! That's about what I did...2 hours of smoke and going to just keep adding charcoal until 4 hours, the wrap in foil and continue. I'm also using the water pan method this time, indirect charcoal on either side with a water pan in the center. Do you increase the heat to 300-325 after smoking?? Trying to decide on whether to continue on the grill or move to the oven at 4 hours...At about 3 hours in I'm at 155 degrees according to my thermo. Sounds right on track to me!

Yoop in my opinion the higher heat will help the fat break completely down, since you haven't mentioned it I will toss it out for your consideration, if you want the bark moist keep it foiled if you want it crunchy un foil it at the end over high heat, that could consist of just rolling it around on your 670's hot grates for a few minutes.

 

 

Sure looks good from my house :)

 

 

jim

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IMO, the butt should be cooked at 225-250 for the entire time. Best taste will be leaving it on the grill, but if you get pressed for time, go ahead and put it in the oven. The oven temp can go as high as high as 350, but, really, the lower your time allows, the better. You're shooting for an internal temp of 190. You will likely experience a "stall" at around 150-170. The temp will just stop rising. That's ok. Resist the urge to turn the heat up.

 

IMO, if you cook it too hot, your meat will be tough. Just my opinion, though. Best thing to do is try it one way and then mix it up the next time!

 

and x2 on tubby's foil recommendation. I like crunchy bark, so I never foil it. If you want, google "texas crutch". I don't recommend it for 1st time butt grillers, as it just complicates things, but something to consider for future roasts..

 

Looks fantastic. Makes me want to do one too :).

 

What are you doing for BBQ sauce? Resist the urge to slather sauce on it. Tastes best naked or with just a dab...

 

matt

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1338228342[/url]' post='86389']

Yoop in my opinion the higher heat will help the fat break completely down, since you haven't mentioned it I will toss it out for your consideration, if you want the bark moist keep it foiled if you want it crunchy un foil it at the end over high heat, that could consist of just rolling it around on your 670's hot grates for a few minutes.

 

 

Sure looks good from my house :)

 

 

jim

 

Thanks Jim! I'm thinking of foiling it now and increasing the heat to 300ish....we want moister bark and would like it to be done by 6 which is 4 hours from now. The temp is holding at 165 so I wonder if I'll make it?!? I know when it's done it's done...patience laugh.gif

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1338230108[/url]' post='86390']

IMO, the butt should be cooked at 225-250 for the entire time. Best taste will be leaving it on the grill, but if you get pressed for time, go ahead and put it in the oven. The oven temp can go as high as high as 350, but, really, the lower your time allows, the better. You're shooting for an internal temp of 190. You will likely experience a "stall" at around 150-170. The temp will just stop rising. That's ok. Resist the urge to turn the heat up.

 

IMO, if you cook it too hot, your meat will be tough. Just my opinion, though. Best thing to do is try it one way and then mix it up the next time!

 

and x2 on tubby's foil recommendation. I like crunchy bark, so I never foil it. If you want, google "texas crutch". I don't recommend it for 1st time butt grillers, as it just complicates things, but something to consider for future roasts..

 

Looks fantastic. Makes me want to do one too :).

 

What are you doing for BBQ sauce? Resist the urge to slather sauce on it. Tastes best naked or with just a dab...

 

matt

 

Matt doing 2 BBQ sauces.....a homemade Carolina style and the old sweet baby rays standby. Both to be applied by the consumer as they want...oh and some creamy homemade coleslaw for topping of course!

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here we are...5 hours in and getting ready to reload charcoal and foil....internal temp of 176 degrees.....

 

post-7665-0-71955800-1338232429_thumb.jpg

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Thanks Jim! I'm thinking of foiling it now and increasing the heat to 300ish....we want moister bark and would like it to be done by 6 which is 4 hours from now. The temp is holding at 165 so I wonder if I'll make it?!? I know when it's done it's done...patience laugh.gif

Foil it tight Yoop, two or three raps it will be real moist, I would turn it also periodically to to have the juice run back to the other side of the roast it will baste in its own juice, I agree with Matt for a butt I wouldn't go high from the start unless it was covered, I have had great results finishing at high heat, just keep a probe in it, i'm also in the 190F range it should pull nicely at that temp and remain some what stringy, I have taken them out to upper 210F and ended up with baby food.

 

I'm also in Matts camp you cant beat that crunch!, in fact I often put my serving on the griddle over my grates with a squirt of vinegar based sauce, to caramelize the sauce and sear the meat, crunchy gooey tangy goodness on a toasted bun :)

 

Some guys let them rest I rarely do I pull it or shred it in the serving tray and mix all the juice back into the meat (including what's in the foil or your original drip tray) and I am already at temp so I dont want it to rise, plus since I am pulling it the juice will run anyhow, unlike serving a carved roast where the juice will stay in the cut, for the drip tray juice I will bring it to a quick boil, just to be safe.

 

thats a small butt depending on the stall 165 to 190 at 300F wont take another 4 hours, again at this point its all about monitoring the probe, the keep warm at 200 isn't my cup of tea either, now you're defiantly going to see some dehydration. it most often goes unnoticed because darn near everyone uses its ajus back in the pulled meat.

 

A good way to reheat if thats what your time frame calls for is to separate the ajus and even add a little stock if needed and simmer that and take the samich filling which I assume will be a tong full and just hold it in the hot ajus for five to ten seconds, pull it up and let it drip a second and drop it on your guests bun :D and let them do what they will with your Q sauce (if any)

 

 

jim

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here we are...5 hours in and getting ready to reload charcoal and foil....internal temp of 176 degrees.....

 

post-7665-0-71955800-1338232429_thumb.jpg

Your on the home stretch Yoop :D

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