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richlife

Strip Steak Score

22 posts in this topic

Now this is going to show my ignorance at it's highest level, but frankly, I've never had a strip steak (that I know of) and certainly never grilled or otherwise cooked one. The closest I came was what they called a "Gambler" at the original Rat (Rathskeller) in Chapel Hill. This was a delicious, somewhat chewy and THIN piece of steak that could be ordered as a double (yes!). It was served on a hot, cast-iron skillet, with lots of grease and onions and french fries all fried up and cooked together. Stunningly delivered with an absolutely necessary serrated knife. Definite mouth-feel but incredibly delicious, it was called a "strip steak". Based on my new experiences of the past few years, my guess is that it was actually skirt steak, but who knows?

 

Anyway, our local Piggly Wiggly has some weekly meat specials that can be quite good deals -- and good Angus beef too. This weeks was whole boneless strip for $4.99/lb. Now maybe I'm a fool for buying beef that I've never tried, but enough of you guys have talked about grilling strip steak, that I decided to go out on a limb and buy a 15 pound slab. So now what?

 

I'll take any suggestions or comments -- anyone want to start with "How could you be such a fool?"? But I'm more interested in your thoughts on cutting this up (steaks, roasts for smoking, etc.), methods and prep (bind a small roast to give a more uniformly thick cut?), and any special recipes if you want to include them. Before I actually start cutting, I'm going to cut of some slices and grill them just to see what I actually bought. Maybe I should go back for another?

 

And on another topic (hey, it's my thread). Anyone interested in my posting (in a new thread) my fantastic recipe for green chili with pork? Sadly it's never around long and I always overeat. <sigh> :huh:

 

Rich

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Now this is going to show my ignorance at it's highest level, but frankly, I've never had a strip steak (that I know of) and certainly never grilled or otherwise cooked one. The closest I came was what they called a "Gambler" at the original Rat (Rathskeller) in Chapel Hill. This was a delicious, somewhat chewy and THIN piece of steak that could be ordered as a double (yes!). It was served on a hot, cast-iron skillet, with lots of grease and onions and french fries all fried up and cooked together. Stunningly delivered with an absolutely necessary serrated knife. Definite mouth-feel but incredibly delicious, it was called a "strip steak". Based on my new experiences of the past few years, my guess is that it was actually skirt steak, but who knows?

 

Anyway, our local Piggly Wiggly has some weekly meat specials that can be quite good deals -- and good Angus beef too. This weeks was whole boneless strip for $4.99/lb. Now maybe I'm a fool for buying beef that I've never tried, but enough of you guys have talked about grilling strip steak, that I decided to go out on a limb and buy a 15 pound slab. So now what?

 

I'll take any suggestions or comments -- anyone want to start with "How could you be such a fool?"? But I'm more interested in your thoughts on cutting this up (steaks, roasts for smoking, etc.), methods and prep (bind a small roast to give a more uniformly thick cut?), and any special recipes if you want to include them. Before I actually start cutting, I'm going to cut of some slices and grill them just to see what I actually bought. Maybe I should go back for another?

 

And on another topic (hey, it's my thread). Anyone interested in my posting (in a new thread) my fantastic recipe for green chili with pork? Sadly it's never around long and I always overeat. <sigh> :huh:

 

Rich

I could be wrong but I think you have the short loin, which is killer, if it was cut up closer to the front of the steer (bone in) it would have the tenderloin (fillet) on one side and be a porterhouse or T bone steak. I think they call it a new york strip as well or a delmonico

 

5 bucks pound is a good deal for that cut, if you are going to smoke a roast of it, myself I would treat it more like a prime rib than a brisket and serve it med rare or med well, rather than take it out to 190 like a brisket, it might not have enough fat in it for that.

 

 

 

jim

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Actually the term "Delmonico" refers to ribeye.

As for strip I have bought the whole loin at Sam's and done a variety of things. I have cut it myself in to steaks to "order" and I have roasted it as a whole roast (very good I might add and actually better than used as steak).

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Actually the term "Delmonico" refers to ribeye.

As for strip I have bought the whole loin at Sam's and done a variety of things. I have cut it myself in to steaks to "order" and I have roasted it as a whole roast (very good I might add and actually better than used as steak).

I think it depends on who your asking B):rolleyes:http://www.steakperfection.com/delmonico/Steak.html

 

NEW YORK, New York -- The Delmonico Steak is one of the most desirable and well-known steaks on the market. It originated between 1840 and 1850 as the house cut at Delmonico's Restaurant in lower Manhattan.

 

However, there is a problem with the modern name "Delmonico Steak": no one seems to remember the exact cut of beef that was the original, authentic Delmonico Steak.

 

The problem is that the meaning of the Delmonico Steak changed over the years and from place to place. More than 150 years after the Delmonico Steak was first offered to customers as the "best steak available", the identify of that original cut has been lost. Or has it? The name is regularly used today as a synonym for a club steak, a New York strip steak, a boneless rib-eye steak, and several other cuts, as described below.

 

So, what was the steak which was used originally at Delmonico's restaurant? What is an authentic Delmonico steak?

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Don't really know. The only reason I posted what I did is I had a (late) friend who was executive chef at a very prestigious establishment. He had loaned me a meat cutting guide he had and that is where I found the description. So who knows? But even in my local markets and meat cutters anything I have ever seen with the name Delmonico was a nicely trimmed rib eye steak.

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Don't really know. The only reason I posted what I did is I had a (late) friend who was executive chef at a very prestigious establishment. He had loaned me a meat cutting guide he had and that is where I found the description. So who knows? But even in my local markets and meat cutters anything I have ever seen with the name Delmonico was a nicely trimmed rib eye steak.

I think Emeril kinda coined it when he opened delmonicos and used a rib eye, wikipedia says its revered to as style of preparation post-6248-0-82032600-1362862477_thumb.png

I kinda prefer bone in for any steak, seams a delmonico is boneless

 

The steakhouse I go to has a delmonico and a rib eye on their menu (strange)

 

anywho thats a good cut Rich got for 5 bucks and I agree probably makes a better roast than steaks.

 

Sometimes I just ask the butcher what cut it is, like is a rump roast a cut from the round (ass end bottom round) or a chuck ( lower front end)

 

to many nick names for beef :D

 

 

 

jim

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...

 

to many nick names for beef :D

 

jim

 

Ain't dat da troot! :blink: And pretty much any meat has too many nicknames.

 

I had seen this cut before and did some wikipedi-ing on "strip steak" only to find some of what you guys said. Delmonico was listed as one of its names as were many in jim's list. I definitely want to try it as a steak, but I figured that a roast may be the best option. And it would give me a chance to finally use my slicer for more than practice. :P

 

This was select grade, so that's part of the low price. Angus is just another cow breed (or something like that), but it sounds right to say "good Angus beef". :rolleyes:

 

I've bought full tenderloins before and cut them to order (still have a few in the freezer -- yum), but that cost twice as much as the strip. Walmart had some 1" strip steaks at $9.98/lb. (didn't notice the grade) while Piggly Wiggly was selling some at $5.99/lb. I figured in the end I can find ways to grill/smoke it that I'll enjoy. It has decent looking marbling, so only heat will tell.

 

jim, as you say, brisket treatment would probably be too much for it, but if that seems needed, I'll treat it as a flat cut brisket and see what works. Some say that brining will make any cut of beef simply wonderful. The best part to me is that I have a hopefully decent big cut of beef that I can experiment some with -- and I doubt any will go to waste! :D :D

 

Rich

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Ain't dat da troot! :blink: And pretty much any meat has too many nicknames.

 

I had seen this cut before and did some wikipedi-ing on "strip steak" only to find some of what you guys said. Delmonico was listed as one of its names as were many in jim's list. I definitely want to try it as a steak, but I figured that a roast may be the best option. And it would give me a chance to finally use my slicer for more than practice. :P

 

This was select grade, so that's part of the low price. Angus is just another cow breed (or something like that), but it sounds right to say "good Angus beef". :rolleyes:

 

I've bought full tenderloins before and cut them to order (still have a few in the freezer -- yum), but that cost twice as much as the strip. Walmart had some 1" strip steaks at $9.98/lb. (didn't notice the grade) while Piggly Wiggly was selling some at $5.99/lb. I figured in the end I can find ways to grill/smoke it that I'll enjoy. It has decent looking marbling, so only heat will tell.

 

jim, as you say, brisket treatment would probably be too much for it, but if that seems needed, I'll treat it as a flat cut brisket and see what works. Some say that brining will make any cut of beef simply wonderful. The best part to me is that I have a hopefully decent big cut of beef that I can experiment some with -- and I doubt any will go to waste! :D :D

 

Rich

I hear ya Rich, Top Blade steak=Flat Iron steak=Chuck :D

 

Well Select is ok, isn't select leaner than choice or prime?

 

I have kinda found any cut if you cut real thin across the top and kinda shave it like filleting fish, makes great tender fajitas/tacos/burritos and steak sammies, marinade/brine about any cut overnight in a citrus based juice and it will melt in your mouth, if you're not big on salt, the juice breaks it down awesome

 

15 pounds is allot for you and the Mrs.

 

I'd try a roast first (just cause that sounds real good to me right now) :P I bet cut thin pounded out a bit and floured then browned in a skillet would make a damm fine stroganoff as well :)

 

 

Maybe start playing around with Jerky, that would come out great in your WSM

 

I know that short loin is always killer braised for hours, but then you have ajus or sauce so maybe the "brisket" approach wont be bad, might be a little dry though?

 

 

jim

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I get good deals on "NY Strips" (as they're called around here) every now and then. They're bone-in or boneless cuts of loin muscle shaped like this: http://goo.gl/DZamk

 

It can be pretty tough because it's so lean, so I sear them as fast and hot as possible and leave it as rare as you can handle it, especially with select grade. There is little fat to render, so the only way to retain moisture is by not overcooking it.

 

Personally, if I'm going to go lean I'll go tenderloin filet. I've been getting that for as low as $7/lb for whole tenderloins. For a fattier steak I'll go chuckeyes for cheap or ribeyes for real. I've had too many tough strips in my day and have shied away from them more recently.

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It can be pretty tough because it's so lean, so I sear them as fast and hot as possible and leave it as rare as you can handle it, especially with select grade.

Those were my thoughts as well Dave might be best as a med rare steak or roast........................ or a stew if you cooked it to death like a chuck roast.

 

 

 

jim

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Hey guys - go easy on my second favorite here (ribeye my first choice) - the NY Strip is pretty much one of the most popular steaks to be had in this NY/NJ Metropolitan area, second probably to a Porterhouse (favored due to the very tender loin section on one side of the bone). Sure, the NY Strip can be tough if you buy it "choice" grade, but find a good prime and it will melt in your mouth, cut with a fork and go down like a smooth malt. Yea - you can find them well aged and marbled as well as any ribeye. Me - I buy them mostly at Costco - I keep eye out for a good cut, usually they are packaged 3 up. And always there will be two good ones and one crap one in the package. Running about 1-1/2 pounds each, about 1-1/4" thick, they taste best rare or medium rare (my preference).

Manhattan has the best and if you're willing to drop about $28 bucks for a 16-18 oz, you'll find yourself addicted if the chef does it right. And Jim - no! NEVER, EVER would you cook a NY Strip steak like a chuck roast! Yikes! :rolleyes:

 

As for Delmonico - I don't know who ever said that could be a NY Strip - but since I've lived here for 62 years and visited most every good joint around - no good beef eater around here would ever confuse a Delmonico - which is usually a very thin cut piece of meat, served about 8-10 oz and always boneless and usually a round shape (vs the strip which is long, wide at one end and tapers to a smaller "point" at the opposite end). Favored by women, children and toothless seniors - the Delmonico is for wusses! B) I live in the real world and regardless of what "they" say about cuts of beef - what I just typed here is how it is in our neck of the woods. That's my say on that subject, Google be damned! :P

 

Seriously, I personally think too much emphasis is placed on what's the best steak. I know guys who will take a flank (skirt) steak and have it the most tender, butter melting piece of meat you ever tasted, and then there's the restaurants who murder a good aged, Prime piece of meat. It's all in just how you cook it, slice it, and/or maybe marinate it. Hell, give me 4 hours, a bucket of sawdust, my grill and a quart of jus de bouef (beef juice) and I'll have you swearing I just served you the best steak you ever ate! :D

 

Dave - that link you provided appears to be the photo album of my menu from last week... :D

 

 

Stripped Mike

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There's not enough fat or connective tissue in strip steak to braise or roast for a long time. It will just dry out and get stringy. Especially if it's select. I can honestly say I've never seen select cuts where I shop... only choice, really. Prime at the good places. Regardless of grade, though, I would only treat strip as a medium rare steak or cooler. That isn't to say a big roast wouldn't be decent if done nicely. Hell, I've had great roast beef from round cuts completely void of fat or anything but solid meat.

 

Delmonico is a long-standing mystery, but my guess is it's a ribeye. At least around Philly, that's what you'll get. I think because ribeyes can look quite different depending on how you trim them, people got confused somewhere along the way.

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. And Jim - no! NEVER, EVER would you cook a NY Strip steak like a chuck roast! Yikes! :rolleyes:

 

Oh contraire me-amigo, its called steak stew :D Anne does this all the time when I buy the kids 18oz porterhouses and they leave 1/2 of it on their plates, makes beef pot pie too!! chuck aint the only game in town

 

Steak (strip, rib eye, porterhouse, T-Bone, etc.)

Potatoes, raw, cut in bite-sized pieces

Carrots, baby or cut up

Celery, one stalk

Onion, chopped

Green pepper, chopped

Green beans, raw or frozen

Water - about 1 C

Broth

Flour

Salt

Pepper and other seasonings

Cut steak into bite-sized pieces and brown in heavy skillet on medium heat, turning frequently to carmelize all sides. Add vegetables and water, reduce heat and simmer, covered, 20 minutes or until potatoes are tender. Watch that the stew isn't boiling, as the potatoes will turn to mush.

 

Remove cover and assess liquid. There should be less than 1/2 C in the pan. Add 2 T of flour or other thickener to broth, stirring until smooth, and add to skillet, stirring to coat all ingredients. Increase heat to bring gravy to a boil. Remove from heat and serve hot.

 

 

 

jim

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I've had great roast beef from round cuts completely void of fat or anything but solid meat.

 

Me too! in my opinion if you braise/boil any beef to a certain temp for long enough it becomes a vessel to carry the flavor of the broth it created :)

 

 

jim

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Thanks for the citrus marinade tip, Jim.

 

So, yes, it's quite possible that traditional preparation may leave this select cut tougher than I want, but I'm betting I can find ways that will make me happy. Brine, buttermilk and citrus are options. So are wrapping with bacon or foiling. Smoking rare and thin slicing works with almost any cut that is more meat than gristle.

 

Maybe ya'll can come up with other ideas. The good news is that I have the meat and a willingness to experiment. Hamburger anyone? :-)

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Naaaah, you don't need all that, Rich. Like Mike said it is one of the most popular cuts because of its big beefy flavor. Steak that puppy up and don't be afraid to chew it 2 or 3 more times per bite. Just allows you to enjoy the flavor that much more.

 

I would salt it heavily an hour before cooking then pat it down well to make sure you get a nice crusty sear. Also be especially sure to rest it long enough before eating, even if it gets a little cooler than you are used to. The extra juice retention is worth it.

 

in my opinion if you braise/boil any beef to a certain temp for long enough it becomes a vessel to carry the flavor of the broth it created :)

 

 

Well, it will certainly carry the flavor and the texture will become quite tender over 190 degrees. But my mother used to always make her beef stew with cheap round roasts and no amount of gravy could help that dried out, chalky beef. I'll eat it and not complain, but something with a little connective tissue has such a better mouth feel. Chuck rules for slow cooking and it only costs a buck or two more than round.

 

I only make slow-cooked roast beef out of round cuts palatable by slicing them as thin as humanly possible across the grain.And cooking it no hotter than medium rare.

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Naaaah, you don't need all that, Rich. Like Mike said it is one of the most popular cuts because of its big beefy flavor. Steak that puppy up and don't be afraid to chew it 2 or 3 more times per bite. Just allows you to enjoy the flavor that much more.

 

I would salt it heavily an hour before cooking then pat it down well to make sure you get a nice crusty sear. Also be especially sure to rest it long enough before eating, even if it gets a little cooler than you are used to. The extra juice retention is worth it.

 

 

 

Well, it will certainly carry the flavor and the texture will become quite tender over 190 degrees. But my mother used to always make her beef stew with cheap round roasts and no amount of gravy could help that dried out, chalky beef. I'll eat it and not complain, but something with a little connective tissue has such a better mouth feel. Chuck rules for slow cooking and it only costs a buck or two more than round.

 

I only make slow-cooked roast beef out of round cuts palatable by slicing them as thin as humanly possible across the grain.And cooking it no hotter than medium rare.

Sounds like my mom knows your mom :D

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And mine! And my wife, too... :<( How did you know what we had last night? Her mother is visiting and guess what?

 

Sheila is cooking for her mother. Tonight is chicken enchiladas -- with boiled chicken. And a special plate for Mother dear with no cheese! Thankfully, I just made up a batch of my chipotle salsa, so I'll get by.

 

Haven't touched that strip steak yet and tomorrow we have to go out for dinner. <sigh>. And then there will be leftovers... <sigh>. Something tells me I'll be enjoying steak instead of pot roast leftovers.

 

Rich

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And mine! And my wife, too... :<( How did you know what we had last night? Her mother is visiting and guess what?

 

Sheila is cooking for her mother. Tonight is chicken enchiladas -- with boiled chicken. And a special plate for Mother dear with no cheese! Thankfully, I just made up a batch of my chipotle salsa, so I'll get by.

 

Haven't touched that strip steak yet and tomorrow we have to go out for dinner. <sigh>. And then there will be leftovers... <sigh>. Something tells me I'll be enjoying steak instead of pot roast leftovers.

 

Rich

You need to take the bull by the horns Rich and go grab that poor chicken and grill it and shred it for her, try to make it look like your trying to help her out.

 

My wife boiled my chicken once and when I found out she wasn't making chicken soup, I almost wound up sleeping on the couch :lol:

 

Hates boiled chicken.........

 

 

jim

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