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Bluesin

Grilla

Grill Mates
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About Grilla

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    GTA - Near Toronto Canada
  • Interests
    Beef Ribs, Steaks, Jerk chicken, beer can chicken...oh you mean outside of just eating...footy, motor bikes, beer and wine (paired with food of course)
  1. It's true. I have an industrial roll of the stuff at about 200 yards and it cost just a bit more than the box. I could never get the foil pouches smoking well but I think I left too much space between the burner and the pouch.
  2. If you try it out see how much ash is allowed to escape. I like the small holes on that one if they can keep most of the ash in. I have a metal box model but the holes at the top are rather large so any wind or a quick hood lift results in ash flying about.
  3. pretty normal especially if you don't do a burn after cooking to incinerate the cooking residue. also, when greasing them up periodically (canola works well here too), remember to do both sides or the underside will rust in short order.
  4. I gave advice via direct message to a new sign up with the handle Highcroft about buying a similar Broil King to mine. He mentioned something about not being able to reply to threads. does that sound right to you? could it be that newbies are not allowed to post for an amount of time or is it just creating new threads?
  5. add me to the list of admirers. I've used youtube videos for education on a number of topics and your presentation was great. really like the double garbage container trick for cutting holes! for your hand held shots you could use this http://littlegreatideas.com/stabilizer/diy/ Not your preferred source material but the tool is great (Sure you could figure out a shaped walnut version with hand grips etc ) I made one of these and they make hand helds night and day more stable. the other option is to just fold the legs of your tripod pick up the whole set up and hold it about 1/2 a foot down from the camera (add weight to the bottom with a camera bag if it's a light tripod) good cutting as well with the transitions to take away the unneeded time but get the necessary details in there for the viewer. EDIT, so yeah, now looking online and there some more complicated but inherently better designs out there. (though requiring more time, $, and design)
  6. well done sir, but....where did you hide the grill? flip top counter? kidding aside, it's amazing what can be done with skill and tools and passion. A couple of colleagues of mine (computer coders no less) had great shops at home and didn't really know each other were so into wood working until retirement. sort of funny. Neither would work for money but if you asked they would make some of the most amazing pieces just for the joy of it. well done, keep up the fantastic work.
  7. Good choice. Sorry I didn't update my BK purchase from last year (just posted) to give you some more info but you found most of what I would have told you on the shop floor at Lowes. I think you will enjoy your new purchase greatly. (or is that grately....)
  8. Okay, so it's been a while due to one heck of a hectic year. In short the 590 is a great tool for the price and I highly recommend it. Will create another entry in this section shortly with the build pictures, foods made (yes, there shall be pr0n), impressions, quirks etc. until I get there, the main deets, Gets up to north of 650 in about 7 minutes with all burners blazing, the cast iron grills leave wicked sear lines on steaks and maintain the heat in the can for quite a while. Heat is very even front to back along the burners and side to side. No hot spots even after 8 months or so of use. with the burners off the cooling time is decently long so there is good heat retention compared to a basic "char broil" model used at a friend's house that cools off faster than a sun bather getting tossed in the deep end. Would have liked a little more sturdyness in the base body and knobs but with metal prices being what they are can't really complain about that for the price. It isn't falling over that's for sure and the knobs do their thing well. top side is dual layers of metal and keep the heat in well, even with a full on burn for a great deal of time the stainless on the top has not discolored at all. The wide surface is awesome for getting a whole meal done no matter the combinations. Do the veggies on one side at a lower temp to get cooked over a period of time, blaze the steaks on the far side to perfect sear/blood red middles. as with all cast iron, keep those grates well oiled and they will do you proud. Wanted to go with stainless but I can wait a few years for that now as I'm not at all dissapointed with the cast, just a bit more upkeep and I'm a bit lazy I guess.
  9. Awesome idea with the overhead burner....never thought of that. I've done this with flatbread as well and they turned out amazing but the topping could have been a bit more cooked up and this is the answer. Using a stone as well to get that crispy crust. Tried a light coat of pesto instead of tomato sauce once and that was fantastic as well. next on the italiano-on-da-grill will be a lasagna with some wood smoke.
  10. And opened a can-o-worms it would seem. I joined earlier this year, got great advice on buying a grill, bought a weber kettle to replace my charcoal pit and a new Broilking gasser. The kettle was a no brainer as there is nothing that is as good for the price. On the gasser side apparently not much weber bullying affecting me here as the EP-3x were in my consideration list and would have fit the budget but I got more features and went out on a limb with a new model. I just got really busy but grilled a heck of a lot of food. have a bunch of pics, reviews and recipes to share when I get out from under a pile of paper at the office. Maybe I should grill that too.... I think a forum like this may over time lose it's appeal not due to the slant of one product or cliques ore what ever. It seems to have started as something that was supported by an active business and that sort of strong support from the owners is necessary to keep a specific forum active. I've seen it elsewhere as I have other interests that are specific in nature that have not been well supported by the owners and have languished. This is no shot at anyone because it is totally understandable that priorities change over time, business changes. Life in the big e-city. So, with that Things are good. Glad everyone else is good. see you in the pics/reviews sections really soon I hope. (oh, and should I pull the staples out of all that paperwork before grillin the stuff to dust?)
  11. The bacon weave is a piece of art sir. The Jalapeno's look so good I might do that and then stuff em with what ever makes sense in the pantry. Looks like your contribution must have been quite the hit. A July 1 celebrator but no grilling happened that day. I'll have some shots of the breakin of the new gasser soon. just have to get my duff off the office chair and into my home desk chair.
  12. One time a while ago (grilled quick as described but with a good shot of salt which I failed to mention), one time in a hipster hoof to nose restaurant. very beefy strong flavour. May try it again as I get more creative with the new equipment. Glad it went well Comotoes,
  13. you have a tough cut there. Good piece to practice with before taking on a meal that has pressure on it.... how ever you do it, make sure to prepare it well. Cut off the fat, valves, tendonous stuff and any membranes. a lot of tough pieces in here that you need to cut away especially if quick grilling. use a sharp knife and tread carefully. you can slice it into 1.5 inch pieces, marinate in oil/onion etc skewer and grill 3-4 minutes a side. this will keep it fairly moist but don't expect this to be as tender as steak. other options to do a low and slow like you would ribs. anywho, try out what ever you are going to do and post back the results! good to start using more of the animal,
  14. Totally choice but the suggestion is pointy side up for steaks and other things you want to have a nice strong sear on. the thin contact point draws up the stored heat in the wider bottom part and therefore doesn't cool down as fast making a strong thinner line. The wide side up is supposed to hold on to juices etc. to keep the cooking target (usually chicken is used as the example) moist over longer periods. I have no idea if the theory is good or not as I haven't started using the ones I have. Test er out and report back (with pictures of course)
  15. old thread but the best way I've found to get great ribs is to buy a rib roast, cut off the roast leaving as much meat as you wish.....however this will lead to more expensive ribs as if the butcher cuts them you pay about half the price per pound because of the bone. Benefit though is you have a great roast to roto on another day!