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Ronald

Grilling Cookbooks

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I have started to collect grill cookbooks. I only use the books that have color pictures in them so I can see how the food should look when it's complete.

The books I currently use are

 

1. Webers Big Book of Grilling

 

2. How To Grill ( the complete illustrated book of barbecue techniques) by

Steven Raichlen

 

3. Great Recipes Collection Grilling Gas or Charcoal

 

 

anybody else have any books to recommend

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I bought BBQ USA: 425 Fiery Recipes from All Across America by Steven Raichlen. It is his most recent book © 2003. Well worth a look for about $20.

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B) Cooking Class Grilling Cookbook. Publications International(Recieved as a Christmas Gift)

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:D The Thrill of the Grill by Chris Schlesinger & John Willoughby covers techniques, recipes, & down-home barbeeue. I received the book as a gift and I’m not sure what price it runs for. The book is a very good read, however, my taste differ from the author’s on some items. Chris also uses a wood fire for his creations and makes no mention of using LP or natural gas. The book is good at sparking new grill ideas into my head and what foods go good with others.

 

Eric D

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:D Sublime Smoke by Cheryl Alters Jamison and Bill Jamison is one of the better books I could recommend. Sorry, no pretty pictures but a lot of good recipes. I purchased the book from Borders for $16.95 plus tax. The book has over 200 recipes and covers just about anything you would ever cook by grill or smoker. Some of the very temping recipes include “Berry Fine Baby Back Ribs”, “Caramel – Ginger Baby Back Ribs”, “Oktoberfest Stuffed Pork Chops”, and one of my favorites is “Wildly Stuffed Turkey Breast”. Mmmm!! This recipe includes in the stuffing dried cherries, nuts and rice. When it’s time for the table it looks as good as it sounds too. Anyway, I do recommend it and I would like to find more books on this level. Yes, it would have been better with some real pictures!

 

Eric D

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I purchased from Amazon two new grilling books. The first is "How to Grill: The Complete Illustrated Book of Barbecue Techniques" by Steven Raichlen;Paperback; for $13.96. The second is "Weber's Art of the Grill: Recipes for Outdoor Living" by Jamie Purviance;Hardcover; for $23.80. I’ve only had them for a few days now, but I find myself studying Steve’s book “How to Grill” the most. I find it very interesting and with excellent “how to” photos and explanations. Yesterday evening, I semi-followed his recipe for stuffed chicken breast. I changed some of the ingredients to match what I had on hand. They came out exceptionally well! His technique for making grilling marks and other like suggestions makes the food presentation much more palatable. This book covers pretty much everything you will need to know about grilling. Wish I had it 10 to 15 years ago.

 

The Weber book is ok but nothing as good as “How to Grill”. I’ll try some of the recipes and will post follow-ups on my findings, but for now I can highly suggest Steve’s "How to Grill”. You won’t be disappointed.

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This is just an update on the earlier suggested grilling book, “How to Grill”. A number of the recipes in this book have been tried with nothing but excellent results. One of the recipes that my Wife and I enjoyed is his technique of doing buffalo chicken wings skewered so that the wing is full open like in flight. This exposes more surface area causing the cook time to be shorter and the outside to be crispier then leaving them in the closed (folded position). For this recipe I followed his marinade suggestion. These would make great appetizers for a party. In our case, we made a meal out of them. Bottom line, this book is still at the top of my must have cookbooks. I would rather give up all the others I have apposed to giving up this one.

 

Eric D :rolleyes:

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I just picked up something new. I picked up a Webers Art of the Grill Deck. The list price is $14.95 but Barnes and Nobel was selling it for $2.95

It's a deck of recipe cards that you can use near the grill. They mesuare 4X6 and have a hard box to keep them in. The cards contain some reccipe's from the website and some that are not in the other two weber gookbooks. There is also a cooking time foldout. The best part is that the cards are washable. For the price it was great

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I just picked up something new. I picked up a Webers Art of the Grill Deck. The list price is $14.95 but Barnes and Nobel was selling it for $2.95

It's a deck of recipe cards that you can use near the grill. They mesuare 4X6 and have a hard box to keep them in. The cards contain some reccipe's from the website and some that are not in the other two weber gookbooks. There is also a cooking time foldout. The best part is that the cards are washable. For the price it was great

 

I was given this deck as a gift. Going through it, I didn't see alot of things I wanted to make. What have you made and what was good?

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Well, almost a year since the last post, but what the hell. I've tried probably two dozen recipes from the "Smoke & Spice" cookbook, and have enjoyed all, no regrets. Having said that, I should say that I've had this thing for several years - it's copyright 1994 - but I just saw this post so hope this info is relevant for anyone curious.

 

Also of note - every time I'm feeling the urge to combine testosterone, beer, fire, and smoke, I search the web for new recipes before applying flame to the newspaper in the charcoal chimney. (By the way - the ONLY chimney I've ever found that works worth a damn is the Weber model) Anyway - many of the recipes I find on the web are the EXACT same recipes from the Smoke & Spice cookbook, but rarely do the posts quote the source.

 

The thing I find most helpful about this cookbook is that there are usually several different recipes for the same cuts of meat. Meaning that if I have a question that doesn't seem to be covered in one recipe, I can usually find the answer in another.

 

And here's a completely unrelated tidbit, from a guy who loves to use lump charcoal - if you can find it, try Original Charcoal Company brand. This stuff is far superior to any other lump I've ever tried. But be prepared - it gives off HUGE showers of small fine sparks while in the chimney. But once it's going, it is very stable and predictable in terms of time required before replenishment during a long slow smoke.

 

I'd ramble on, but my beer mug seems defective (it's empty) and I need to go check the temp on the smoker..

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I'd ramble on, but my beer mug seems defective (it's empty) and I need to go check the temp on the smoker..

 

Wow! Been almost two years since the last time I looked in this forum. I have probably the same copyright as your copy of Smoke & Spice. I too have enjoyed the recipes for use with my smoker. I have to admit that I haven't had the smoker out in well over a year. Next weekend I plan to use it. I have a number of turkey drum sticks and a large salmon side filet and a ham. Can't wait to get started.

 

Smokinfunk what did you make yesterday and how did it come out?

 

Eric D

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Smokinfunk what did you make yesterday and how did it come out?

 

Eric D

 

Hiya Eric. Q'd up a 5-lb slab of pork spareribs. This time was kind of a hybrid recipe, as I was in an experimental mood. Used the Cajun Ragin' rub (p. 78 of Smoke & Spice), applied the night before. Smoked using mesquite chunks over six hours. While on the smoker, mopped with the Bourbon mop (p. 73). During the last 1.5 hours, applied a sauce of equal parts Cattleman's and Sticky Fingers Memphis Style (store brands). Normally I wouldn't do the sauce during cooking because of the risk of burning the sugars in the sauce(s) - but it was a beautiful day in Charlotte and the smoker was hovering nicely at 200 degrees (love that Original Charcoal Company lump - it's rock-stable) so I was willing to risk it and it was worth the risk since I confined it to the last hour-and-a-half.

 

Turned out fine in terms of my preferred degree of pulling-away-from-the-bone doneness, and that mix of sauces was really tasty. However - I think the rub made 'em a tad too salty for my taste..I may have applied too much. I'm learning that celery salt has a very pronounced taste so I probably should have gone a little lighter on the rub.

 

My wonderful wife prepared a mixed greens salad and some of her outstanding bacon-overdosed Twice-Baked Potato casserole. St. Pauli Girl Dark to wash it all down. My wife says the ribs were outstanding - I'm just anal when it comes to my own cooking efforts which is where my saltiness comment comes from. Saltiness notwithstanding, we definitely cleaned our plates, and the leftovers will surely be consumed!

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Hiya Eric.  Q'd up a 5-lb slab of pork spareribs.  This time was kind of a hybrid recipe, as I was in an experimental mood.  Used the Cajun Ragin' rub (p. 78 of Smoke & Spice), applied the night before.  Smoked using mesquite chunks over six hours.  While on the smoker, mopped with the Bourbon mop (p. 73).  During the last 1.5 hours, applied a sauce of equal parts Cattleman's and Sticky Fingers Memphis Style (store brands).  Normally I wouldn't do the sauce during cooking because of the risk of burning the sugars in the sauce(s) - but it was a beautiful day in Charlotte and the smoker was hovering nicely at 200 degrees (love that Original Charcoal Company lump - it's rock-stable) so I was willing to risk it and it was worth the risk since I confined it to the last hour-and-a-half.

 

Turned out fine in terms of my preferred degree of pulling-away-from-the-bone doneness, and that mix of sauces was really tasty.  However - I think the rub made 'em a tad too salty for my taste..I may have applied too much.  I'm learning that celery salt has a very pronounced taste so I probably should have gone a little lighter on the rub.

 

Wow! All sounds good to me. The over night rub might have been a little long before the meat hit the smoker. I normally put any of my rubs on minutes before placing the meat in the smoker.

 

Charlotte, would it be the one in Michigan? My daughter and son-in-law live there.

 

I have to admit that I nolonger use lump charcoal. The masters will turn in their graves, but I have gone to LP. I do some long duration smokes that required more attention with lump then with LP. For example if I do a large turkey I might have it in the smoker 10 to 14 hours. With the LP, it takes less than an hour to zero in the venting and burner settings to go to the end without touching a thing other then the flavoring wood chips. I've gotten lazyer with age..

 

Eric D

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I don't really think it was the fact that it went on overnight, I've been doing that for years. I think the problem was simply the ratio of rub to surface area. Didn't occur to me that with ribs what hits your palate is going to have a lot higher ratio of rub to meat than something like a Boston Butt or brisket. I'll bet that if I go easier on the rub the problem would disappear. I'll try it that way next time. (This was also the first time I've tried the Cajun Ragin' rub on ribs).

 

'Fraid it's not the Charlotte in Michigan - it's the one in North Carolina. I'm a fairly recent transplant from Pensacola in the Florida panhandle. After hurricanes Ivan and Dennis - them being my 6th and 7th major hurricanes - I'd had all the fun I could stand. My employer went through a merger and asked me to relocate to headquarters (Charlotte) so the timing worked out after those hurricanes. I like it here, but being a smaller-town boy I find the crime rate somewhat alarming..

 

On the lump vs. LP - I understand your point completely. I've always been a charcoal purist, actually a lump charcoal purist, but after coming to Charlotte all I could find was Cowboy Lump Charcoal - and that stuff SUCKS!!! (It's made from lumber scraps, clearly visible when you open up a bag, and it burns about as fast as paper!) So after going through a couple bags of that I was seriously toying with the idea of going gas. (Going back to briquettes just isn't an option..especially since Kingsford has further ruined their recipe for briquettes, and you just don't see other brands around here). Then after some exhaustive web searching I found a site that recommended the OCC stuff I've mentioned previously. Managed to find some in Charlotte. It's made from South American hardwoods, super-dense, fragrant, excellent burn times, linear heat buildup rather than the temperature "spiking" I've seen with many other lump brands. One bag lasts me easily twice as long as any other I've tried (and that includes Big Green Egg lump, which seems to be "the standard" for many). So - I'm happy again, and spending less time than ever babysitting the temperature. About once an hour I throw another handful of lumps in, and another chunk or two of whatever wood I'm using, and that's all it needs.

 

You mentioned getting lazier with age - I feel your pain. That's part of the reason I'm not switching..I'm sure that my own particular brand of laziness would translate to: beginning a Boston Butt or some other 12-hour project like the turkey you mentioned, only to discover that being too lazy to check the tank, I'd run out of gas mid-way with no spare tank on hand!! And once I start smoking or grilling, I'm settled in for the day with no intention of having to get in the car to go pick something up. Now that's LAZY!

 

Plus there's always that other factor mentioned by the inimitable Mr. Raichlen - the primal joy of playing with fire. Sometimes I can almost see myself in a loincloth, charcoal-smudged all over, beating my chest as the wisps of smoke float around me..

 

Egad - methinks I speak too much..

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Plus there's always that other factor mentioned by the inimitable Mr. Raichlen - the primal joy of playing with fire.  Sometimes I can almost see myself in a loincloth, charcoal-smudged all over, beating my chest as the wisps of smoke float around me..

 

Egad - methinks I speak too much..

 

Boy, I don't blame you for getting out of the panhandle. I've often thought of checking out North Carolina for a possible place to retire to. How is the cost of living? Is the crime rate greater then most towns? I think the yearly temperatures would be more to my liking then Michigan or Florida. Did you have any losses with the hurricanes?

 

I know what you mean about primal joy and fire. I still play with making fires, I just don't include my food.

 

Eric D

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