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Turkey on the Rotisserie?

43 posts in this topic

I have a Summit S470 with the Rotisserie, and I would like to use that for T-Day this year.

How big of a turkey can you fit on the Rotisserie and still have the bird clear the infrared burners, and without getting too close to them?

Does anyone have experience with that on the S400 or S600 series of Webers?

 

I was thinking of maybe putting two 12 lbs. on the rotisserie. Would that work?

 

Thanks for any input you may have.

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I just cooked a 16 lbs bird during Canadian Thanksgiving on my S670. I called Weber and was told the weight limit was 18lbs. I found it much more difficult to balance the large turkey compared to a chicken. I recommend you put the bird on the spit and in your grill with no heat and test the motor. Luckily I did this as I had to remount the bird as the weight was lopsided and resulted in it not turning well.

 

After I was satisfied I took out the bird and preheat to 500F.

After preheating I turned the rotisserie burner on high and left only the outside burners and smoker burner on high.

I put the bird in.

After 20 minutes I turned off the rotisserie burner as the skin was already brown and put the smoker burner on low to maintain 350-375 for the rest of the cook.

It was ready in just under 3 hours from when I put it on.

I minimized the number of times I opened the lid (probably every hour or so after I turned off the rotisserie burner).

 

I used Alton Brown's recipie to brine the bird and I used a free range turkey. It came out amazing. I'm not sure if it was the high quality bird, the rotisserie, or the brine. The leftover breast was moister than most turkey breasts when they are first cooked.

 

Let me know if you have any other questions.

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I just cooked a 16 lbs bird during Canadian Thanksgiving on my S670. I called Weber and was told the weight limit was 18lbs. I found it much more difficult to balance the large turkey compared to a chicken. I recommend you put the bird on the spit and in your grill with no heat and test the motor. Luckily I did this as I had to remount the bird as the weight was lopsided and resulted in it not turning well.

 

After I was satisfied I took out the bird and preheat to 500F.

After preheating I turned the rotisserie burner on high and left only the outside burners and smoker burner on high.

I put the bird in.

After 20 minutes I turned off the rotisserie burner as the skin was already brown and put the smoker burner on low to maintain 350-375 for the rest of the cook.

It was ready in just under 3 hours from when I put it on.

I minimized the number of times I opened the lid (probably every hour or so after I turned off the rotisserie burner).

 

I used Alton Brown's recipie to brine the bird and I used a free range turkey. It came out amazing. I'm not sure if it was the high quality bird, the rotisserie, or the brine. The leftover breast was moister than most turkey breasts when they are first cooked.

 

Let me know if you have any other questions.

John didn't your rotto come with a counter balance weight?

 

18 pounds!! thats a big chicken, what is the diameter of your rod 3/8's or 5/8's

 

jim

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I just cooked a 16 lbs bird during Canadian Thanksgiving on my S670. I called Weber and was told the weight limit was 18lbs. I found it much more difficult to balance the large turkey compared to a chicken. I recommend you put the bird on the spit and in your grill with no heat and test the motor. Luckily I did this as I had to remount the bird as the weight was lopsided and resulted in it not turning well.

 

After I was satisfied I took out the bird and preheat to 500F.

After preheating I turned the rotisserie burner on high and left only the outside burners and smoker burner on high.

I put the bird in.

After 20 minutes I turned off the rotisserie burner as the skin was already brown and put the smoker burner on low to maintain 350-375 for the rest of the cook.

It was ready in just under 3 hours from when I put it on.

I minimized the number of times I opened the lid (probably every hour or so after I turned off the rotisserie burner).

 

I used Alton Brown's recipie to brine the bird and I used a free range turkey. It came out amazing. I'm not sure if it was the high quality bird, the rotisserie, or the brine. The leftover breast was moister than most turkey breasts when they are first cooked.

 

Let me know if you have any other questions.

 

John, thank you for the input. Good to know the 18 lbs limit on the motor and the spit. So I guess I shouldn't do two 12 lbs birds.

I take it from your post that the 16 lbs bird you did had no problems clearing the infrared burner on the rotation. Maybe I can feed enough people with a 16 lbs bird. I need to check on that.

Which Alton Brown brine recipe did you use? The honey brine?

 

Thanks

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John didn't your rotto come with a counter balance weight?

 

18 pounds!! thats a big chicken, what is the diameter of your rod 3/8's or 5/8's

 

I have a 2011 Summit. No counter balance weight included anymore although the diagrams in the manual still show it. If I had to guess the rod is 3/8". That reminded me that the spit/rod would actually bow in the middle due to the weight.

 

John, thank you for the input. Good to know the 18 lbs limit on the motor and the spit. So I guess I shouldn't do two 12 lbs birds.

I take it from your post that the 16 lbs bird you did had no problems clearing the infrared burner on the rotation. Maybe I can feed enough people with a 16 lbs bird. I need to check on that.

Which Alton Brown brine recipe did you use? The honey brine?

 

The 16 lbs bird cleared it fine. What I did before buying was put the spit on the grill and measure how far I had between the spit and the burner or other obstacles. I then scoped out a grocery store and took a look at the frozen birds. Keep in mind you will not be able to perfectly center the turkey. If I had to guess an 18 lbs bird would probably fit physically. The hard part as I mentioned is balancing it since all the weight seemed to be in the breast and legs which are both on the same side of the bird. I needed to remove the grates and then placed a $1 disposable roasting pan on the flavor bars to catch the drippings.

 

I used Alton Brown's "Good Eats Roast Turkey recipe" which is where I also got my temperatures from. The only thing I didn't like about it is the flavor it gave the turkey soup made from the carcass. I'm definitely sold on brining now. I actually test brined a chicken the week before as I was worried that brining may make it too salty.

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John, thank you for the input. Good to know the 18 lbs limit on the motor and the spit. So I guess I shouldn't do two 12 lbs birds.

I take it from your post that the 16 lbs bird you did had no problems clearing the infrared burner on the rotation. Maybe I can feed enough people with a 16 lbs bird. I need to check on that.

Which Alton Brown brine recipe did you use? The honey brine?

 

Thanks

 

Actually the reason for the weight limit on a single bird is twofold. One the diameter gets too large. But two, the weight is concentrated off the axis of the rod/motor. You could easily exceed the weight as long as balance is good. So 2 smaller birds that exceed the weight is not too hard on it. Remember the further the weight is concentrated away from the rod the more torque the motor needs to turn it.

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Actually the reason for the weight limit on a single bird is twofold. One the diameter gets too large. But two, the weight is concentrated off the axis of the rod/motor. You could easily exceed the weight as long as balance is good. So 2 smaller birds that exceed the weight is not too hard on it. Remember the further the weight is concentrated away from the rod the more torque the motor needs to turn it.

 

When I called Weber I asked what the maximum weight the rotisserie can accommodate. I'm sure there is a margin on that number, but you could hear that the motor was working harder when lifting the heavier part of the bird (breast side) up. As mentioned, I rebalanced the bird once (I forced the legs to the back side using the spit) which helped, but it is impossible to properly balance the turkey without poking the spit right through the middle of the meat. I also used lots of twine to tie the thing to keep all the loose parts from flopping (I probably could have done a better job if I spent more time).

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When I called Weber I asked what the maximum weight the rotisserie can accommodate. I'm sure there is a margin on that number, but you could hear that the motor was working harder when lifting the heavier part of the bird (breast side) up. As mentioned, I rebalanced the bird once (I forced the legs to the back side using the spit) which helped, but it is impossible to properly balance the turkey without poking the spit right through the middle of the meat. I also used lots of twine to tie the thing to keep all the loose parts from flopping (I probably could have done a better job if I spent more time).

Try using a 4 forked prong, no string balances perfect

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I have to say I am really looking forward to cooking the turkey on the rotisserie this year. Thanks for all your tips so far. I'll let everyone know how it turns out.

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Which Alton Brown brine recipe did you use? The honey brine?

 

Thanks

 

2X

I need to find a new brine recipe. I used to do a beer brine - but got an allergic to beer person eating with us now.

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2X

I need to find a new brine recipe. I used to do a beer brine - but got an allergic to beer person eating with us now.

Every try using chicken or veggie stock with the water when you brine? It makes for some killer gravy from the drippings.

 

 

jim

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These are some brine recipes that I have saved, starting with my favorite. I usually soak for 36 hours. I double 2 kitchen size trash bags, place the turkey in the bags, pour in the brine, roll bird making sure the cavity's are filled, squeeze the bag getting all the air out, then place it in a small but large enough cooler, then cover with ice to the brim. You can add ice if needed but late November temps usually don't melt it fast.

 

 

 

Usually takes 2 or more gallons of water to cover completely

 

After mixing 2 gal, try just plain water to complete the cover.

 

1 Cup Kosher salt

1 Cup Brown Sugar

1 T Garlic Powder

1/2 T Onion Powder

Raid the cabinet adding what ever you see and think will fit.

 

This is a simple basic brine if you don't want to go all out. Mix ingredents together and cover bird(s) for 24 hrs. or longer @ 40º or less. I usually pour a bag of ice on top and leave the cooler outside

when it's cooler out that in.

 

Enjoy

 

 

 

The Fat Man's Kickin' Brine

 

2 gallons water

1 1/4 cup pickling salt

3/4 cup brown sugar

3 tbsp. garlic powder

1/2 tbsp chili powder

1/2 tbsp ground sage

1 1/2 tbsp crushed red pepper

4 bay leaves

1/2 tbsp paprika

3/4 tbsp Dave's Insanity Sauce

 

Enjoy,

TFM

 

 

 

 

Here is a brine I like and will be using in 2 weeks!!

 

If you have a 5 gallon bucket this is the best

 

for each gallon of water add the following

1 1/2 cups more or less according to your taste and health, salt

1 1/2 cup brown sugar

3 cups apple cider or juice

1/2 teaspoon ginger, fresh if you have it

4 tablespoons black pepper

4 cups lemon juice, fresh preferred

1/2 oz maple flavoring

 

soak the bird in this solution for at least 2 days, 3-4 is better

remove from brine and rinse with cold running water

pat dry and rub bird in and out with brown sugar (optional)

 

smoke at 225-250 for 1 to 1 1/2 hour per pound till the temperature in

the thigh reads 170-180. of course the shake hands method works also!!

if the leg wants to come off in your hand the bird is done!! another way

to tell the doneness is when the juices run clear.

 

by the way you brine the bird in the ref.!!! cover the bucket. I use a

plastic sack.

 

the smoking time will be determined by your smoker and the wind and the

temperature.

 

Hope this does you a good job and good luck!!!

 

 

 

A Collection, take what you wish, leave the rest

 

 

 

 

HOLIDAY TURKEYS AND BRINING

 

 

 

GENERAL COMMENTS

 

BRINING is Easy To Do, and Produces Incredible Results !

You will be Very Happy this Holiday Season if you chose to

brine you turkey or turkey breast first.

 

 

And brining works whether you plan to cook your turkey in

the oven, or smoke it on a pit.

 

Just a few General Notes to keep in mind as your read this

document.

 

Be VERY CAREFUL on your salt solution. Brining is VERY

easy to do. But it DOES require that you follow the

instructions detailed below. You will almost ALWAYS have

excellent results if your Turkey is Under Brined

(too little salt or too little time) but it MAY be almost

uneatable if:

A) The brine solution includes too much salt,

B) The brine solution does not contain enough sugar,

C) The turkey is left in the brine solution too long or

D) The turkey is not washed THOROUGHLY afterwards before cooking.

 

We might suggest you try the following:

 

1) Make your (basic) Brine Solution up using:

 

Slightly LESS salt than suggested, especially if this is

your first time to brine.

 

And use at least a HALF CUP of sugar.

And of course, your spices.

 

Brown sugar is preferred by many.

 

Also note that Instead of sugar or maple syrup, you

can try sweetening the brine with honey, molasses,

or even caramelized sugar.

(HINT: See Jim Minion's Honey Brine Turkey In Part 2 !)

 

2) Leave your meat in the brine solution on the low end of the

time table described.

 

3) Brining MUST take place at 40 degrees or below.

Please do not try and cut corners on the proper temperature.

Place your turkey in the brine solution after it is Cool -

not while it is still warm.

Cool the brine solution with ice in plastic bags, if necessary.

 

Good Luck and Happy Holidays, Mikey

 

==========================================================

 

 

NEW ARTICLES AND CHOICE RECIPES

 

 

 

PART 1

 

** HOW TO BRINE A TURKEY ***

 

Should I brine the turkey and what's brining?

 

Brining is simply soaking in a salt water solution.

 

The benefits of brining are many fold. First, brining

provides a cushion for the breast meat, so even if it

overcooks by ten degrees or so, it remains moist.

 

Secondly, the meat of a brined bird tastes pleasantly

seasoned, which eliminates the need to season before

and after roasting.

 

Because the turkey sits overnight in a tub of salted water,

brining also ensures that all parts of the turkey are at the

same temperature. This is especially good insurance if

you're roasting a previously frozen bird.

 

Yet another benefit is that the turkey meat absorbs water

during the brining process. Water is a heat conductor and

therefore expedites cooking. We tested this theory and

found that indeed, a brined bird cooks faster than an

unbrined one by about thirty minutes. So while it may seem

like added work, dunking a bird in the brine is worth it for

a whole host of reasons.

 

Two important notes about brining: Do not brine for longer

times than those recommended here, and be sure to rinse the

bird until all traces of salt are gone it will take several

minutes when it's done brining. Both of these measures will

prevent the bird from becoming too salty.

 

How To Brine Overnight:

 

Before brining, remove the giblets, neck, and tail piece and

reserve for gravy. To brine overnight, dissolve 1 cup table

salt or 2 cups kosher salt in 2 gallons cold water in a large

stockpot or clean bucket (whatever you use, it should be 6-8

gallons), submerge the bird in the solution, and refrigerate

for 8 to 12 hours. For ease of cleaning, you can line the

brining vessel with a turkey-sized oven bag. If your

refrigerator space is at a premium - as it is for many of us

during the holidays, try using a more concentrated, and

therefore quicker, brine along with some disposable frozen

ice packs, as explained below.

 

How To Brine For 4 Hours

 

Follow the instructions for brining overnight, doubling the

amount of salt in the solution. After 4 hours, remove the

turkey from the brine, rinse well under running water, and

pat dry inside and out with paper towels.

 

How To Brine Outside Of The Refrigerator For 4 Hours

 

Follow the instructions for brining overnight, doubling the

amount of salt in the solution. Place 4 or 5 large clean

frozen ice gel packs in the brine with the turkey, tie the

bag shut (if using an oven bag), cover the container, and

place it in a cool spot for 4 hours. After 4 hours, remove

the turkey from the brine, rinse well under running water,

and pat dry inside and out with paper towels.

 

=================================================

 

PART 2

 

* TURKEY HONEY BRINE *

 

VERY HIGHLY RECOMMENDED !!!

 

The Honey brine is easy and very good for a first try.

 

1 gal water

1 cup kosher salt

1 ounce tender quick

1 cup honey

3 bay leaves

1/4 tsp. ground cloves

1/2 tsp pickling spices

 

Mix ingredients, and bring to a boil.

(The salt will dissolve faster this way).

 

Allow to the brine solution to COOL to room temp.

(Hint: IMPORTANT !)

 

Place turkey in brine and refrigerate for 24 hours.

 

Rinse turkey VERY well TWICE.

 

Rub with your favorite spices and smoke/cook.

 

There is already enough salt from the brine,

so Go Easy ! on the salt in the rub.

 

Smoke at 325 to 350 for best results.

 

Jim

 

=================================================

 

PART 3

 

IT's TURKEY TIME AGAIN

 

 

 

It's getting close to turkey day again. How strange we are to

ignore a tasty, economical source of protein ten months out of

the year. Unlike chicken, which we consume year round, we

reserve turkey for that period between Thanksgiving and

Christmas. Surely our tradition drives the turkey producers

up the wall.

 

Besides tradition, turkeys present a few differences from

chicken that make some folks hesitate. Their large size puts

off some people. Even if they have a large oven and time,

not many enjoy turkey seven days in a row.

 

Then there are those who have a terminal case of over cook

when it comes to turkeys. They consistently turn out turkey

breast as dry as a dust devil's breath. To head off such

disasters, they use elaborate schemes involving aluminum foil,

roasting bags and even boiling.

 

Here is another place where a good grill and a little organized

laziness comes to the rescue. These days it is relatively easy

to buy smaller turkeys or even turkey breasts or thighs, year

round.

 

Therefore there is no need to cook so much that you get sick of

it before it is gone. Surprise yourself several times a year

with a tasty turkey dish. The cooking part is easier than

taking a nap.

 

Select a turkey that fits your needs - fresh, if available. I

find the cheaper brands as good as the premium. If it is frozen,

carefully follow the directions for thawing. Trim excess fat

and skin and pat dry.

 

Fire up the grill for roasting - about 350 degrees. Build a

good, large bed of coals and reduce the heat by closing down

the air supply. Collect a small amount - 3 to 4 pounds of

green fruit wood, white oak and hickory.

 

Sprinkle the turkey inside and out with a mixture of:

 

Garlic powder 1 teaspoon

Onion powder 1 teaspoon

Celery seed, ground 1 teaspoon

Sage 1 Tablespoon

Thyme 1 Tablespoon

Fresh ground black pepper 1 Tablespoon

Salt 1 Tablespoon

 

Place turkey on the grill, opposite the coals, breast up.

Close the grill and go away for about an hour.

 

Check the temperature of the exhaust, look over the coals and

put on a few pieces of green wood. If you must use chips or

dried wood, soak in water for at least thirty minutes.

 

Maintain the temperature between 300 - 350 degrees with a

gentle smoke floating from the exhaust. Tidy up, close the

grill and go rest from your labors.

 

Check back in about an hour later and insert your handy

thermometer in the center of the thickest part of the bird.

When it reads 165 degrees, time is up. It is done. Remove

and let it sit for about 20 minutes before carving.

 

It should be as juicy as the latest gossip and tender as a

baby's sigh.

 

==========================================

 

PART 4

 

*** TURKEY BRINING ***

 

 

He has an EXCELLENT home page

(http://members.tripod.com/~DanGill/)

 

with a VERY large section dedicated to BBQ'ing and

Smoking, and helping others to learn the right methods.

He also has a rather complete page detailing the brining

process.

 

http://members.tripo...ing.htm#poultry

 

He has kindly allowed me to "borrow" his page intact.

 

NOTE: Dan is also the most kind host of the "6th Annual

Remlik Steamed Crab, Silver Queen, and Q Feast"

held at his home in Virginia at the end of July.

You can real all about it at

 

http://members.tripo...ll/Announce.htm

 

 

===========================================

 

"Turkey: To Brine Or Not To Brine"

 

By Dan Gill

 

"Turkey and chicken may be slow smoked but the skin is

rubbery and not very good.

 

They don't need a great deal of smoke flavor, so

temperatures of 275º to 325º are ideal. Use lighter

flavored woods such as cherry and apple.

 

If you smoke a turkey at temperatures of 180º to 225º F.,

you need to brine it or risk making everyone very sick

because the bird spends a lot of time in the danger

zone (40º to 140º F.). At 250º F. and above the risk

decreases dramatically. List members (starting with me)

discovered that brined birds are moist and taste really

good. Many of us have publicly declared that we will

not cook another turkey without brining it first.

 

Some people are sensitive to salt and find that birds

subjected to the full treatment are too salty for their

tastes. To reduce the saltiness, add sugar, decrease

salt, decrease brining time or soak the bird in fresh

water for an hour prior to cooking. You can brine just

with salt but since salt takes flavors in with it, why

not take advantage. Sugar moderates the salty taste and

helps keep the birds juicy. Most of the people who have

commented that their birds were too salty did not use

enough sugar. The garlic, ginger and maple flavors are

very subtle but enhance the flavor of the bird. For

safety, I would definitely recommend using the brine

full strength when cooking below 200º F. At higher

temperatures, you can cut the salt in half if you are

salt sensitive.

 

Do not over cook! Brined birds cook faster so be careful

and use a real thermometer inserted into the thickest

part of the breast. Cook to 170º internal. There is no

need to cook with the breast down because the bird will

be plenty juicy.

 

Estimate how much liquid will be required to completely

cover the bird(s).

 

for each gallon (which should cover one 16# whole bird

or two 8# breasts), mix:

1 1/2 cups salt

1/2 cup molasses

1 1/2 T crushed or minced garlic (or garlic powder)

1/2 T onion powder

1/4 cup pepper

1/2 cup lemon juice

1/2 oz maple flavoring

 

I also usually throw in about 12 oz ginger ale.

Alternatively, use 1/2 T ginger (ground, minced or

whatever) in place of the garlic and onion.

 

Cover birds completely with brine and refrigerate

overnight. In the morning, remove from brine and

drain while preparing smoker. Smoke at around 275

(measured at grate level) to an internal temp of

170 basting with butter every few hours to give you

the golden brown skin."

 

(END OF ARTICLE)

 

=========================================

 

PART 5 - 3 OTHER INCREDIBLE RECIPES

 

A - Another Jim Minion Turkey Brine Recipe

 

1 gallon water

3/4 cup salt( sea or kosher)

3/4 cup sugar

1/4 cup soy sauce

1/4 cup molasses

2 tbsp black pepper

1 tbsp thyme

1 tbsp oregano

bring mix to boil and allow to cool to room temp.

 

You can do your own other ingredients like maple syrup,

garlic, onion, allspice, ginger, or spices you like can

be used.

 

**********************

 

B - *** Honey and Apple Smoked Turkey ***

 

By Marlene Rausch

 

You don't have to brine a turkey before smoking it,

but it does provide you with a moist, succulent bird.

I prepared four turkeys before getting this recipe

right and it is quite delicious. It turns out slightly

sweet and salty, nicely smoky and is one of those

mahogany visions that would be the envy of any every

gourmet magazine food stylist. You could probably use

maple syrup for this instead of honey. I also tried a

glaze of brown sugar and water, applied every hour or

so, during smoking and got great results.

 

1 turkey (10 to 12 lbs.)

 

BRINE

 

16 cups of water - approximately

4 cups hot water

3 cups pickling salt

1/2 cup white sugar

1 tablespoon garlic powder

2 tablespoons onion powder

2 tablespoons pickling spice

1 teaspoon saltpetre (optional)

 

DRY RUB

 

2 tablespoons paprika

1 teaspoon Old Bay seasoning

4 teaspoons kosher salt

1/2 teaspoon white pepper

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

1 cup maple syrup

2 apples, quartered

 

SMOKER PREPARATION

 

Pre-soaked apple and/or maple chunks

apples, about 3 medium, quartered

water

 

24 hours ahead: brine turkey

Fill a large, non reactive container such as a large

stock pot with 16 cups of water. In another bowl, stir

the four cups of hot water with the salt, sugar, onion

powder, garlic powder, pickling spice and saltpetre (if

desired). Stir into cold water in stock pot to dissolve

salt and sugar.

 

Immerse turkey in salted, spiced water and weigh down to

keep submerged. (I used a brick wrapped in a ziplock bag).

Refrigerate overnight or at least 4-6 hours. Once in

awhile, swish turkey around (this is called "overhauling').

 

Meanwhile, soak about 12-20 medium large chunks of maple

and apple hardwood in water overnight (or at least a couple

of hours).

 

Next day, remove turkey from brine. Dry very well. Mix dry

rub seasonings together: paprika, Old Bay, salt, pepper,

and garlic powder. Pat all over turkey.

 

Fill turkey cavity with a couple of quartered apple sections.

 

Prepare smoker according to manufacturer's instructions. Add

apple pieces to water tray.

 

Once briquettes are hot, place 4-6 wet wood chunks on top.

 

Place turkey on cooking grate and close lid. Baste with maple

syrup during the last three hours (every 45 minutes or so).

 

Smoke cook, about 4 1/2 - 6 1/2 hours, until turkey temperature

reads 160-165 F. Technically, turkey is thoroughly done when a

meat thermometer inserted into the thigh reads l80 F. However,

I found if you actually keep it on the grill until that point

it will dry out. At 160-165 F., the temperature continues to

climb rather quickly - even as you remove the turkey. Taking

it off at l60 F. ensures it will not be overdone and dry.

 

The first three turkeys I smoked were taken off between 170

and 180 F. They were flavorful but rather dry. The last one,

removed at 160 F., was perfect. For safety's sake, please

note that many home economists are emphatic about the l80

degree minimum.

 

Remove turkey from smoker, drain inside cavity. Cool to warm

before placing in fridge to "mature". (24 hours is best.

Overnight is okay).

 

Eat and Enjoy !

 

 

*****************************

 

C - APPLE CIDER BRINED TURKEY

 

Courtesy Of Marlene Rausch

 

4 gal. Apple cider

4 oz. Kosher Salt

1 ea. Onion (diced)

2 ea. Heads Garlic split

4 oz. fresh ginger, chopped

3 pcs. Star Anise

4 bay leaves

4 ea. Oranges quartered

 

Method (In a large stock pot):

Sauté the onion, garlic, ginger, and anise together in a

little canola oil, until lightly browned. Add the bay

leaves and the oranges.

Sauté another 2-3 min.

Add the cider and the Kosher salt.

Bring to a simmer for 1 minute.

Remove from heat, transfer to another container and

chill completely (use an Ice bath if possible).

 

Rinse and dry bird.

Place bird in a large vessel to marinate in.

Pour the well chilled brine over the bird and turn to coat

well.

Place a weighted plate or something of the sort over the

bird to keep it immersed.

Cover and refrigerate while marinating.

Turn the bird daily.

Marinate a minimum of 48 hours.

Reserve some of the brine to baste with if you like.

 

Proceed with roasting as usual ( I like to start with the

breast side down).

I made this much brine to marinate (2) 14# birds.

 

I highly recommend this brine and received rave reviews

with it last year. I will do it again this year.

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Nice John

Another tip on brining: poultry cooks faster when brined so tubby would suggest implanting a temp probe B) or a vigilante eye ;)

 

If you just try and time a brined turkey you could over cook it (been there done that) :)

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John

Thats what I'm talking about :) :) :)

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