Welcome to the New Upgraded BBQ Source Forums. Please let us know if you have any issues with the new site, we will be customizing it for a while to get it looking as sharp as ever. 

Thanks,

Bluesin

richlife

Some catchup

42 posts in this topic

Yes unless you have the ability to grow your own food. Eating healthy is very expensive.

Thats why I eat so much fish. I catch it , I store it. I cook it.

I only buy fresh kill from a slaughterhouse. Anything else only comes from COSTCO.

 

I have a rule. If the word FRESH is in the name of the market. I wont shop in it.

It is a given that markets are only suppose to sell fresh food. If they have to remind us it is fresh, that usually means it is not

Thats cool Ron, the stuff in the market thats "farm raised" is terrible for you, I always get the "wild caught" fish, yeah anything with names like "real" "lite" means the company just coined a phrase for the junk they are selling.

 

What I hate is to get organic chicken that hasn't been plumped with salt can be ten bucks a pound, supposedly if you soak the chicken in buttermilk it leeches the salt from the meat, bread or potatoes soaking in fresh water with the bird will help draw the previously injected salt from the chicken.

 

I used to brine my chicken and turkey, probably why I have high BP now, well that and years of eating off roach coaches on construction sites :)

 

 

 

 

jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Thats cool Ron, the stuff in the market thats "farm raised" is terrible for you," Actually not totally true. There is some farm raised fish (Salmon in particular) that is actually better for you and better eating than the wild. Just happened to see it on America's Test Kitchen. Turns out that Julia Collin Davidosn's husband is the show's private fish monger. He noted that Salmon farm raised from Europe (in particular Ireland's Claire Island) and from Scotland are particularly more wholesome and better tasting than wild. He said that the wild tends to have a lot of PCB and stuff which the top quality farm raised does not. I have 2 stores near by that sell these particular Salmons and I have to say they blow the wild stuff "outta da water" (no pun intended). They are not cheap but OH BOY are they ever good. The guy also indicated these particular FR salmon have higher levels of the good Omega stuff because they are raised in the Atlantic in very cold waters.

Anyway just my .02 Euro ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, OK, you bullied me into it. :-) , Shelly.

Rich

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Thats cool Ron, the stuff in the market thats "farm raised" is terrible for you," Actually not totally true. There is some farm raised fish (Salmon in particular) that is actually better for you and better eating than the wild. Just happened to see it on America's Test Kitchen. Turns out that Julia Collin Davidosn's husband is the show's private fish monger. He noted that Salmon farm raised from Europe (in particular Ireland's Claire Island) and from Scotland are particularly more wholesome and better tasting than wild. He said that the wild tends to have a lot of PCB and stuff which the top quality farm raised does not. I have 2 stores near by that sell these particular Salmons and I have to say they blow the wild stuff "outta da water" (no pun intended). They are not cheap but OH BOY are they ever good. The guy also indicated these particular FR salmon have higher levels of the good Omega stuff because they are raised in the Atlantic in very cold waters.

Anyway just my .02 Euro ;)

Ya don't say, I thought it was just the opposite heres some stuff I found:

"The program cited a pilot study conducted by Dr Easton with David Suzuki Foundation. The study found that farm raised salmon and the feed they were fed appeared to have a much higher level of contamination with respect to PCBs, organo-chlorine pesticides and polybrominated diphenyl ethers than did wild salmon. It concluded that it seems that contamination in farm fish comes from the feed."

 

"the Environmental Working Group EWG released a report stating that farm raised salmon purchased in the United States contain the highest level of PCBs in the food supply system. In the report, EWG reported that farm raised salmon have 16 times PCBs found in wild salmon, 4 times the levels in beef, and 3.4 times the levels in other seafood. EWG recommends that consumers choose wild salmon instead of farm raised salmon, and they should eat an 8 oz serving of farm raised salmon no more than once a month.

Science Journal: In the journal Science warned that farm raised salmon contain 10 times more toxins (PCBs, dioxin, etc.) than wild salmon. The study recommends that farm raised salmon should be eaten once a month, perhaps every two months as they pose cancer risks to the human beings.

 

"Many farmed salmon are also treated with antibiotics to increase their size, and they are artificially colored to make the flesh a deeper pink color.

Since farmed salmon are raised in close proximity to each other there is also a much higher incidence of disease and sea lice than found in wild fish. To combat this many fish farms put antibiotics in the fish feed to keep infection down and the fish healthy. As a result the areas around fish farms can suffer negative ecological effects from the engineered fish feed and fish waste."

 

“Wild salmon become pink by eating sea creatures like krill, which contain a carotenoid called astaxanthin. Farmed salmon are naturally grayish but turn pink when they are fed various sources of astaxanthin, including one that is chemically synthesized and others that originate from yeast or microalgae.”

 

Since i'm in the states I'm going for the wild caught :)

although not to disparage Julia Collin Davidosn's husband :rolleyes:

 

 

jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He addressed that in the interview and noted that many of those fish (cited for contamination) were raised in Chile (which I avoid like the plague) and even the ones raised in the USA were noted for being fed GMO feed and such. While the salmon raised in Europe were the healthiest. I don't believe there was any hidden agenda. His sales were not on the line. Even my own senses tell me it's high quality. There is no need for artificial color disclosure as they don't have any, they are truly fresh (not "previously frozen") as you see in the fish case all the time. It cooks wonderfully and I personally have confidence in it. Things I do avoid. The aforementioned Chile Salmon, Tilapia (of all kinds ), any fish farm raised in countries I don't believe in (Vietnam, China, and so on). I will purchase wild caught catfish from USA, Lake Superior Whitefish wild from USA and so on, I do some mean Octopus on the grill (wild caught) same with calamari (wild caught).

But just because something is farm raised it does not scare me as long as my research shows it has not been fed GMO product, hormones, antibiotics and so on

But I do understand the study you cited but note they don't even mention the certified organic raised product(s) I buy. If you find these products do the research yourself and try them you will be pleasantly (as I) surprised.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He addressed that in the interview and noted that many of those fish (cited for contamination) were raised in Chile (which I avoid like the plague) and even the ones raised in the USA were noted for being fed GMO feed and such. While the salmon raised in Europe were the healthiest. I don't believe there was any hidden agenda. His sales were not on the line. Even my own senses tell me it's high quality. There is no need for artificial color disclosure as they don't have any, they are truly fresh (not "previously frozen") as you see in the fish case all the time. It cooks wonderfully and I personally have confidence in it. Things I do avoid. The aforementioned Chile Salmon, Tilapia (of all kinds ), any fish farm raised in countries I don't believe in (Vietnam, China, and so on). I will purchase wild caught catfish from USA, Lake Superior Whitefish wild from USA and so on, I do some mean Octopus on the grill (wild caught) same with calamari (wild caught).

But just because something is farm raised it does not scare me as long as my research shows it has not been fed GMO product, hormones, antibiotics and so on

But I do understand the study you cited but note they don't even mention the certified organic raised product(s) I buy. If you find these products do the research yourself and try them you will be pleasantly (as I) surprised.

I wish Hood my market is soo limited, my choices are usually poop and crap :) heck my costco is 50 miles each way from the house. I would have to drive 110 miles out to the coast to get really good fish.

 

Some of you guys are lucky you have access to good organic foods.

 

 

jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually I thought I lived the "barrens". When I first moved here I asked people where I could find good deli. My answer always came back "What is deli?" Having been born/raised in Chicago on da nortwest side and living there most of my life I became used to culture. Like knowing the Italian neighborhoods, the Polish, Middle Eastern and so on and could plan menus accordingly. Wife and I used to live only 4 doors away from a very famous fish house in Chicago. That was really nice. I could come home from work, change, light the grill and walk down the alley to the shop. I'd walk in and tell them I just lit the charcoal or the gasser and the guys knew me and they'd make recommendation on what flew in fresh that day.

Now I am at the mercy of only 2 real groceries. None of which are anything to write home about. But at least between the 2 of them I can find decent fish. the one is run by an Italian family from Chicago so I can lay my hands on some pretty decent sea food.

Otherwise like you I have very limited options and VERY expensive. Our Schnuks markets are so expensive for meats that it makes sense to be a vegetarian. Can you imagine having to pay close to $11 lb for CHUCK?! :( I can't always buy at Sams because I really hate buying such huge quantities and having to freeze but I can buy tenderloin for the same cost that Schnuks charges for their worst cut of round!

Yep they got us by the stones because there is no competition

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

. Can you imagine having to pay close to $11 lb for CHUCK?! :( I can't always buy at Sams because I really hate buying such huge quantities and having to freeze but I can buy tenderloin for the same cost that Schnuks charges for their worst cut of round!

Yep they got us by the stones because there is no competition

I would never pay that for chuck, thats robbery, I'm lucky in the beef department, my market has great prices on choice beef, but if I want prime I have to go to the butcherpost-6248-0-95920800-1368302594_thumb.png

 

Yeah I hate frozen beef myself, always seams to cook up a bit stringy (unless maybe I vac seal it)

 

I don't think any of us here are eating like crap, its the crap thats in the food thats suppose to be good for us thats killing us :D

 

 

 

jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I run 6 miles/week and row 6 miles/week and do the 100 push ups program every other day:

 

http://www.hundredpushups.com/#sthash.L2Ba8KxD.dpbs

 

I rarely eat red meat but for sure enjoy a good steak once or twice per month. I can live just fine and do without beef burgers, hotdogs,sausages. I put pork in the same category as beef and really limit my intake.

I surf all year round in NJ. I'm 58 years old and feel great with zero aches or pains. My wife is 56 and the same, although she doesn't surf!

 

There are so many foods available to us that can be grilled. I'm a huge fan of grilled asparagus. It's a perfect grilling vegetable. Same withe zucchini. I have been focusing my grilled proteins on chicken, fish/shellfish, turkey.I have lately taken to grilling large Vidalia onions sliced in half. Can't wait for Jersey tomatoes. Corn is way too many carbs/ sugars even though its so good you really need to limit eating it. The salt and sugar in something as mundane as a roll is staggering. Bacon? Salt,sugar,fat,nitrites...I can live without it thanks.

 

Four years ago, I stopped eating red meat entirely for two years. Not so much as an aversion to red meat per se, but to establish a blueprint or map for a healthier way of eating.

Once you establish that and find the right exercise regimen for yourself, you can slowly and very conservatively reintroduce some less healthy foods(red meat) in very minimal quantities back into your diet.

 

Health is about choices and lifestyle and self-discipline, which for many folks in this country change is so badly needed. You simply cannot eat anything and everything and think you can undo the consequences with a pill.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AND ONE MORE THING. Now I'm angry.

 

Ever since my stent insertion, I've been reading more and more labels of the food I purchase. It sickens me how much fat and salt we consume in items that really don't seem to warrant the quantities used. You can't get away from it with any normally prepared food items. Also it seems, anything with lower salt or fat content are proportionately higher in price. It figures.... Really angry now.

 

In my daily quest for news, I found this the other day. I generally do not pay much attention to anything the CDC says, and this is probably why.

 

http://preventdiseas...tm_medium=email

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good or bad - I've switched to using the Costco Sea Salt about a year ago. Not sure who to believe anymore about what is good or bad for us, but I'm still of the camp that the Earth being covered 75% with salt water has to mean something, and that something has to be good for us. Though what we are doing to the oceans spells disaster on the long term - there's no denying that the oceans do (did) produce some of the healthiest food for thousands of years.

 

Which makes me angry as well seeing as I love fish so much. And am dismayed to disbelief in the minimal "fishing waters" left available to us. In my area - most of the rivers, streams, lakes and ponds are marked with signage denying fishing (for edible use) in those waters. Sigh...

 

Salt. Yea - we need it - in true moderation perhaps - but truly an essential mineral for us. It's like Lewis Black says - "first the Government told us eggs were good for us, then bad, now good but not the yokes. They told us milk was good when we were kids, now they say it's not good. F#*K them!" Now they're going round and round on salt - good salt, bad salt - what the heck! What's a person to do anymore - who do we believe?

 

Angry is an understatement!

 

mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read the article interesting really, I do know I have checked my bp and had a 118/78 in the morning then ate a bunch of KFC for diner and felt like crap and checked again and it was 105/145, from consuming 4000 mgs of salt at one time.

 

 

jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now