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Cleaning Stainless steel grates

#1 User is offline   E-Man 

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Posted 07 September 2004 - 04:50 PM

Hello,

I finally made my grill decision. I picked up a Weber Genesis Gold B. Price utimately became the deciding factor for me - a deal too good to pass up. Those stainless steel grates and flavoizer bars look so good when they are new -- but heat the grill up the first time and cook something and all the shine is gone. Granted I knew this -- it just difficult to see the "flashy" stainless become discolored. I am please with the performance thus far -- the sear marks from the grates even look good --

Anyway to my question - proper car of the stainless grates -- brush off the food when the grill is still warm just after cooking, or wait until I fire it up the next time - high heat for 10 minutes and then brush off? What to use to remove the residue -- a scrubber or a brass brush. Or does this even matter -- they are stainless and do what ever you want?

Also,

The weber heats up quickly and fast -- it does not take long for the temp gage to go beyone the 550 degress it shows on the temp gauge. But is seem that as I turn the heat down, the temp gage does not go down too much -- it still seems to be in the 500-550 range? Is this just a case of the grill not being broken in yet? I have cooked on it at least five times -- but these were not long grill times just burgers, pork chops, french toast, etc. I will say that the temp gauge works -- because when I open that hood the needle quickly moves down to a lesser temperature.
any thoughts?

thanks
Ed
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#2 User is offline   dabowsa 

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Posted 07 September 2004 - 05:08 PM

I don't know what's best to clean the SS grates, but I wait until I fire it up the next time to use a brass brush on my porcelin coated grates. This is mostly because when things are done cooking, I have my hands full carrying and serving things.

As far as the temp not dropping when you turn the heat down, this simply means that this new outdoor oven you bought retains heat well. This is a good thing - and having the temp fall when you open the hood shows this as well.

-Benji.
grill: Weber Genesis Silver B, Coated Cast Iron Grates
purchased: 05/29/04, 12:50PM
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#3 User is offline   oillogger 

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Posted 07 September 2004 - 10:38 PM

E-Man,

Congratulations on getting your new grill. You really can't go wrong with a Weber. I too had the same feeling about the stainless steel on my grill the first time I used it. I hated to see all that pretty stainless steel loose it's luster and now have assumed that it is stainless so as you stated "...do what ever you want". I always wait till the next time is fired up to clean the grating.

oillogger

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Always let the Son shine thru.

Hibachi Double Steak Burner 1976 - Raccoons stole it in 1979. No regrets.
CharBroil Lava Rock Wonder 1978 - The piece of garbagge died in 1982 and went somewhere other than BBQ Heaven. See ya.
Cajun Cooker from Wilsons 1982 - Still a kicking but in the retirement home as the GOSM took the smoking helm.
Thermos Lava Rock Wonder 1985 - Died in 1990 and also went somewhere other than BBQ Heaven. No love lost here.
Weber Gensis 1994 - Died a faithful death in 2006. Currently resting peacefully in BBQ Heaven. Miss you dear old friend.
Jenn-Air/Nexgrill, 720-0061-LP, 3 burner, 45K BTU from Lowes July 27, 2004
GOSM Big Block, June 2006
Ultra-Sear, December 25th, 2007
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#4 User is offline   DGriller 

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Posted 06 October 2004 - 10:22 AM

To clean the graets just hit them with a brass brush while you are pre-heating the next time you cook. You also want to keep an eye on you drip pan to make sure it does not get clogged...and change out that little grease catch pan as needed.

The rest is pretty much common sense. Clean up any big spills and dont let large food particles collect. SS will turn color when heat is applied, there is nothing you can do about that so just accept it. This is one of the reasons Weber was reluctant to manufacture a SS grill for so long. They will, however, weather the elements for a very long time.
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#5 User is offline   Jon 

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Posted 20 June 2005 - 08:02 PM

I'd like to revive the discussion about cleaning stainless steel grates (and cleaning a grill in general).

I've been through a number of cheap grills in the past, and I've *really* been enjoying my new Jenn-Air / Nexgrill for the past few weeks and finally doing a bit more serious grilling than I ever did before. Now that I've actually finally learned to pre-heat the grill properly and wait for the meat to sear and release from the hot grill before I move it, I want to keep the whole thing working this nicely.

I've read in a couple of places that the key to a grill that actually continues to "release" food as it cooks is keeping the grill clean.

I've also read that most people seem to do little more (if any more) than use a brass brush or stainless steel brush to scrape the grill after cranking it up hot enough to toast whatever might be left on the grill. I can do this of course, but I've found that the brush tends to still leave a bunch of discolored streaks behind on the grill, and I'm wondering if allowing that to build up will compromise the grill.

The first few times I used the grill, I actually brought the grates into the kitchen after they cooled down and finished scrubbing them in the sink. I can see doing this occasionally, but it seems like overkill (especially considering how heavy and clumsy the thick SS grates are, and their tendency to scratch my porcelain sink!).

So - I want to find the right balance between keeping the grill clean enough to keeping performing like new, and not having to clean it so much & thoroughly that it becomes a major inconvenience.

This is pretty basic, I guess - but I'd love to hear from some others. What's your actual routine with your grill, and what does it take to keep it clean enough to continue cooking/releasing like new?
- Jon

2005 Jenn-Air (Lowes / Nexgrill) 720-0061
(new as of Memorial Day '05)
Princeton Jct, NJ

http://www.stronggroup.com
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#6 User is offline   oillogger 

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Posted 20 June 2005 - 09:22 PM

Of course you could always just say, "Last year's ashes, this year's flavor" then your grill cleaning will be very minimal at best. My approach is close to that since I do not desire to be a slave to my own grill. Right before cooking, I usually just brush brush them heavy duty stainless steel grates with a very stiff wire brush since almost nothing will hurt them. The grease tray gets emptied and wiped only when a fair amount of grease collects in it. I will also quickly wipe down some of the outside of the grill while heating it up just to freshen up it's appearance. About every 2 or 3 months I will Shelia Shine the grill to shine/clean it up a bit. You can go overboard with cleaning and maintenance if you enjoy that but never forget who bought who. :)

Quote

Always let the Son shine thru.

Hibachi Double Steak Burner 1976 - Raccoons stole it in 1979. No regrets.
CharBroil Lava Rock Wonder 1978 - The piece of garbagge died in 1982 and went somewhere other than BBQ Heaven. See ya.
Cajun Cooker from Wilsons 1982 - Still a kicking but in the retirement home as the GOSM took the smoking helm.
Thermos Lava Rock Wonder 1985 - Died in 1990 and also went somewhere other than BBQ Heaven. No love lost here.
Weber Gensis 1994 - Died a faithful death in 2006. Currently resting peacefully in BBQ Heaven. Miss you dear old friend.
Jenn-Air/Nexgrill, 720-0061-LP, 3 burner, 45K BTU from Lowes July 27, 2004
GOSM Big Block, June 2006
Ultra-Sear, December 25th, 2007
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#7 User is offline   dwost 

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Posted 20 June 2005 - 10:09 PM

Jon, here are a couple tricks you can try. I agree with Oillogger as his approach is similar to what I do as well. I usually don't touch the ouside unless we are getting ready for a cookout and guests are coming over. As for the inside, you really don't want it totally free of grease, char, etc.. as this will add flavor to your foods. The last thing you want is some left over Simple Green flavorizing your food!! Anyway, I simple pull the grates, remove the tamers, burners and use the scraper on my brush to remove any heavy residue. I then just brush out the debris into the drip pan, remove, dump and give it a quick rinse. That's about it for the inside. I then brush off the tamers and replace everything.

As for the grates, here is a trick that is quite slick. (sorry for the rhyme :) ) Let the grill heat up as usual. When you hit around 500 or so go out with your brass bristle brush and a little container of water. Dip the brush in the water and brush away. Continue dipping and brushing until the entire surface is clean. You will be amazed how much crap comes off of the grates!!!! I do this before I grill every time and the grates look great. Periodically you can bring them out and use easy off or similar to get them looking close to new again. Personally, I've not done this yet in the 1yr + that I've been using my JA. Food releases as well as day one. Also remember to add a little cooking oil to the grates prior to adding the food, this also helps tremendously. I use the pam grilling spray and give the grates a good dose right before I add the meat. Be sure you don't let the flame back into the can or else BANG!!! :) Let me know how this works out for you.

Don
Don


2004 Jenn-Air 720-0061 (3 burner)


Modifications

- cast SS burners
- upper/lower removable vent mod
- NG conversion: upgraded to 54,000 btu
- utensile hooks, rotisserie storage, internal rack, paper towel holder
- Nexgrill griddle
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#8 User is offline   Jon 

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Posted 21 June 2005 - 05:30 PM

Thanks for the suggestions guys. I just tried the "heat the grill and use a wire brush dipped in water" technique. Worked just fine, as predicted - thanks! I made some teriyaki chicken kabobs for my wife and myself, and my kids and their friends opted for hotdogs, so it was a quick & easy night for all of us, and the cleanup took all of 10 minutes!

As long as it works this easily, I'll probably stick with the hot grill/wet brush technique with a more thorough cleaning once a month.

Thanks!

BTW - re: PAM - spraying anything near an open flame freaks me out a bit, so I've gotten into the habit of spraying Pam (actually, there's a generic brand of olive oil spray at a local store that's even cheaper than Pam and has a nice flavor) directly on the food before putting it on the grill. Works great, and there's less chance of becoming a charred jon-kabob that way!
- Jon

2005 Jenn-Air (Lowes / Nexgrill) 720-0061
(new as of Memorial Day '05)
Princeton Jct, NJ

http://www.stronggroup.com
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#9 User is offline   Smoky 

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Posted 21 June 2005 - 11:20 PM

Hey guys,
On the grill cleaning. I found this really neat thing at Lowes. It is a small white brick type of tool that will form to your grates after a few uses. I am not sure what the name of it is but its in the grilling section of Lowes. The only bad thing about it is when you first get it, it leaves a little residue (of the material) for the first few times, I brush it off, but after it gets broken in a few times it works great.
As I preheat the grill, a few swips and its clean... Preheat as usuall, shut down and spray with Pam.
BTW. You can't miss the tool it is a small 4" x 3" x 2" white brick. I am going to try the brush and dipping suggestion also, thats a good idea.
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#10 User is offline   smokinfunk 

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 11:22 AM

Hey gents,

I've got a New Braunfels combo smoker/grill that has stainless grates that, according to the manual, are "porcelain-ized". Found that typical brushes made of wire have sharp tips that score the metal, helping food to stick no matter how clean the grates seem. Found a different type of grill brush (wife found it actually, can't tell ya where, she doesn't remember) that works great, good scraping, no scoring. It looks like a capital letter "y" and the handle is the bottom of the "y". The two top "arms" have loops of stiff non-corrosive wire coiled through them - kinda like if you took a coiled spring and secured all the coils on one side of the spring to metal bar, and spiral the spring around the bar 360 degrees as you secure it. Its so different that I'm pretty sure I've completely confused anyone reading this with my pathetic description. The point is - sharp wire tips never touch the grate, so you are scraping using the rounded sides of the wire, rather than thousands of sharp spikes. Combine that tool, with the technique that you don't try to move the meat until the outer surface is cooked, and I rarely have sticking problems any more. I used to spend motions oiling the grates, oiling the food, I never bother with that any more.

If anybody has a burning curiousity, I'll get off my duff and post a photo of the thing. Hope it helps!
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#11 User is offline   dwost 

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 03:07 PM

smokinfunk, on Jul 5 2005, 12:22 PM, said:

Hey gents,

I've got a New Braunfels combo smoker/grill that has stainless grates that, according to the manual, are "porcelain-ized".  Found that typical brushes made of wire have sharp tips that score the metal, helping food to stick no matter how clean the grates seem.  Found a different type of grill brush (wife found it actually, can't tell ya where, she doesn't remember) that works great, good scraping, no scoring.  It looks like a capital letter "y" and the handle is the bottom of the "y".  The two top "arms" have loops of stiff non-corrosive wire coiled through them - kinda like if you took a coiled spring and secured all the coils on one side of the spring to metal bar, and spiral the spring around the bar 360 degrees as you secure it.  Its so different that I'm pretty sure I've completely confused anyone reading this with my pathetic description.  The point is - sharp wire tips never touch the grate, so you are scraping using the rounded sides of the wire, rather than thousands of sharp spikes.  Combine that tool, with the technique that you don't try to move the meat until the outer surface is cooked, and I rarely have sticking problems any more.  I used to spend motions oiling the grates, oiling the food, I never bother with that any more.

If anybody has a burning curiousity, I'll get off my duff and post a photo of the thing.  Hope it helps!
<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


I'm assuming from your description these are a stainless core grate that has a porcelain coating on them. All of the JA models and many of the other mfg are now using solid SS for all their grates. I used one of those coiled "Y" brushes on my old grill that had porcelain grates. I agree it was "easier" on the metal but honestly, you'll be there for a week trying to clean off a large grill. It went right in the trash after one use. You have to do each rail individually as the "Y" fits around each rail. I understand the logic on using coiled soft wire on porcelain grates, however, for solid SS go with a brass bristle brush and water. I've had 0 issues with sticking and i've been using this method for over a year on my 61. We grill at least 3-4 nights a week year round and I've not suffered any ill effects from the brush.
Don


2004 Jenn-Air 720-0061 (3 burner)


Modifications

- cast SS burners
- upper/lower removable vent mod
- NG conversion: upgraded to 54,000 btu
- utensile hooks, rotisserie storage, internal rack, paper towel holder
- Nexgrill griddle
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#12 User is offline   elkanddeer 

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 03:31 PM

dwost, on Jul 5 2005, 03:07 PM, said:

I'm assuming from your description these are a stainless core grate that has a porcelain coating on them.  All of the JA models and many of the other mfg are now using solid SS for all their grates.  I used one of those coiled "Y" brushes on my old grill that had porcelain grates.  I agree it was "easier" on the metal but honestly, you'll be there for a week trying to clean off a large grill.  It went right in the trash after one use.  You have to do each rail individually as the "Y" fits around each rail.  I understand the logic on using coiled soft wire on porcelain grates, however, for solid SS go with a brass bristle brush and water.  I've had 0 issues with sticking and i've been using this method for over a year on my 61.  We grill at least 3-4 nights a week year round and I've not suffered any ill effects from the brush.
<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Hi all hope everyone had a great 4th. How can i get rid of a surface scratch on the outside of my JA 5 burner grill? thanks
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#13 User is offline   dwost 

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 05:33 PM

elkanddeer, on Jul 5 2005, 04:31 PM, said:

Hi all hope everyone had a great 4th. How can i get rid of a surface scratch on the outside of my JA 5 burner grill? thanks
<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Call Nexgrill and utilize the lifetime warranty!!! ........... get a replacement panel for free :)
Don


2004 Jenn-Air 720-0061 (3 burner)


Modifications

- cast SS burners
- upper/lower removable vent mod
- NG conversion: upgraded to 54,000 btu
- utensile hooks, rotisserie storage, internal rack, paper towel holder
- Nexgrill griddle
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#14 User is offline   Jon 

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 08:09 PM

That would be great if they would replace the panels when they get scratched! Do you really think they will? (if anyone tries this, please report back here and let us know!).

Also - minor scratches can be fixed pretty well. I don't have the manual in front of me, but I believe the JA book discusses the use of super-fine abrasives to rub out scratches, although I imagine it would be nearly impossible to get a uniform finish to blend really well...
- Jon

2005 Jenn-Air (Lowes / Nexgrill) 720-0061
(new as of Memorial Day '05)
Princeton Jct, NJ

http://www.stronggroup.com
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#15 User is offline   dwost 

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 08:30 PM

Jon, on Jul 5 2005, 09:09 PM, said:

That would be great if they would replace the panels when they get scratched! Do you really think they will? (if anyone tries this, please report back here and let us know!).

Also - minor scratches can be fixed pretty well. I don't have the manual in front of me, but I believe the JA book discusses the use of super-fine abrasives to rub out scratches, although I imagine it would be nearly impossible to get a uniform finish to blend really well...
<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



You can use an auto buffer with different grit levels (heavy, medium, fine, etc...) Similar to what you can do with a car finish. You could also try and wet sand it working from a 1000 grit up to a 6000 grit paper. Unfortunately, you may be creating more work for yourself but you will eventually get it looking like new.
Don


2004 Jenn-Air 720-0061 (3 burner)


Modifications

- cast SS burners
- upper/lower removable vent mod
- NG conversion: upgraded to 54,000 btu
- utensile hooks, rotisserie storage, internal rack, paper towel holder
- Nexgrill griddle
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