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Weber, Lynx or other? TO BUY OR NOT TO BUY? Please help with any thoughts or advice on these

#1 User is offline   seasoned griller 

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 02:37 PM

Hello, everyone. I have been grilling for 20 years or more now, and just got the green light to upgrade my equipment after a trusty Weber Genesis Silver has served me well for nearly 10 years. I have looked at HD, Lowe's, HD Expo, BBQ Galore, and others. We are not building an outdoor kitchen now, but we might in the near future. Price is not really an issue, but I am vacilating between the Weber Summit 670 with non-infrared sear section, or the 52-inch Lynx with Pro Sear. I haven't ruled out all others, but I like Weber because of past experience, my starter still works on mine after 9 years, and I think I have only had to replace the flavorizers once. I slow cooked a stuffed turkey on it over Christmas with wood chips wrapped in foil (I also used the brine technique which I see has some contraversy) and it was very tasty. However, the performance has degraded now and I am getting hot spots and I have never been able to really sear steaks like on a TEC or even a really hot grill. When the wife approves the upgrade its hard to argue against it. I have never used a rotiserie but a good friend swears by it for chicken and turkey. I figured one can buy the cooked rot chickens for $7 at the grocery store, but he said the home-cooked on a grill are much better (not sure how or why).

Here are the pros and cons and questions I wressle with and am looking for insight:

Lynx: Super expensive, but appears to be very well-built and well-engineered. Pros are adjustable infrared searing (only company that makes adjustable infrared burner), has ceramic rocks that are supposed to spread heat evenly and add to the flavor vs. all metal like Weber or Viking. Also has adjustible rotisiere (speed and placement) and it looks great. Cons are price, don't know how it cooks and don't know anyone who has ever cooked on one and can't find any positive or negative feedback online other than their own PR. Not sure if its because only 4 or 5 people in the world can afford it and these people don't really cook on them or go online and post on forums. I don't know how customer support is at the company. I don't know how good the lifetime warranty really is, etc. Finally, is it worth thousands more than the top of the line Weber? Will any cooking be easier, or come out better or faster?

Weber. Good experience with last grill points to them as does a lot of positives from people on the forum. Company has a good reputation for quality and service. The only reason I see not to go with Weber, is some concern that they are importing parts now and how that might affect future quality, and will I miss the difference between infrared searing at 1200 degrees, vs. their gas searing solution? Will I regret not getting the Lynx super high end model if I could? They have last year's Lynx on sale where I live, so I can save a little off of the retail price. Can the Lynx adapt to a built-in situation? BBQ Galore says no because they are 100% welded, but that built-ins can be built around the carted grills. Are Weber rotiseries as good as Lynx or others? How well does each grill let you turn down or cook indirectly vs. full strength. One issue I have with all previous grills is not having enough variation from high to low.

Other questions. Have I overlooked another option that is equal or better? Will the Lynx have issues or cost a lot to repair things that are somehow not under warranty? Will I want to keep a grill for life or 20 years or however long the Lynx lasts? Do they really last that long and how high-maintenance are they? I am not one to take grills apart and clean and replace parts. I used to think I was one to do that, but in practice I am more likely to just replace it when it has issues and I am not one to clean a grill or even cover it--though the place this new grill is going is a covered area and I am having a gas line moved to the new location.

These are the questions I have. I am curious to find out if there are any serious grillers using Lynx that have positive or negative reviews or answers to the above. I also welcome any feedback on any of the questions, or the comparison of the two.

As for other options, I see people like the Jenn Air, but my local Lowe's doesn't seem to stock it. I also have not seen any Napolian grills anywhere, but are often recommended here. I have looked at some Fire Magic built-ins, but the local dealer doesn't stock the carted version. I couldn't get anyone to help me at their dealer, so I basically ruled it out without learning much about them. BBQ Galore makes the Turbo, but the salesman said the Lynx was much better. I couldn't figure out what the Lynx would do better than theirs, but I expected him to push their own grill over the competition, and he didn't, so either his commission is tied to the bigger sale, or he really doesn't think their product is ready for prime time. Would love to hear if people have experience with the Turbo. I understand people liked the Costco grill from last year, but the new one has much less stainless or a lower grade stainless. They are so much cheaper I assumed they were like the Char Broil/cheap version or copy of the high-end stainless and that it wouldn't last long or wouldn't cook evenly. I also am interested in the Green Egg and have some friends that drink the Kool Aid, so one thought was go with Weber and use the savings to get an Egg. I have never been a big smoker/slow cooker, but I suppose I could learn, and I think the BGE can get pretty hot and do steaks, but probably not as easily as a modern gas grill. I appreciate in advance any thoughts from the serious grill masters on this forum. Thanks.
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#2 User is offline   mnlang 

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 02:57 PM

SG -

Welcome to the forum!

My first observation is, isn't it great to have choices! Unfortunately, I can offer about zero advice on the Lynx. I hope others can potentially shed some light for you. Seeing that you are a long time Weber owner, you are already familiar with what the Weber name gives you. It appears that you have also been following the Weber "Made in/Assembled in USA" thread that has made the rounds.

Quote

I slow cooked a stuffed turkey on it over Christmas with wood chips wrapped in foil (I also used the brine technique which I see has some contraversy) and it was very tasty. However, the performance has degraded now and I am getting hot spots and I have never been able to really sear steaks like on a TEC or even a really hot grill. When the wife approves the upgrade its hard to argue against it. I have never used a rotiserie but a good friend swears by it for chicken and turkey. I figured one can buy the cooked rot chickens for $7 at the grocery store, but he said the home-cooked on a grill are much better (not sure how or why).


The Weber rotisserie works great. Although I have had the rotisserie on the kettle for "donkey years" (as my wife would say), I never really used it as much until I bought the 650. Although cooking a bird indirect will yield great results, the rotisserie works even better. I will never buy a roto chicken in the store when I know I can go home and do the exact same thing.

Quote

will I miss the difference between infrared searing at 1200 degrees, vs. their gas searing solution?


Good question...and one which I can't answer. I know that I am happy searing at 700 degrees on the 650 and others that have the 670/470 seem to like the gas sear. I guess part of my justification would be based on how much I planned to use the sear burner. Although I do cook a lot of red meat, I do a lot of other grilling too. It just depends on what your personal habits are going to be.

Have you contacted Lynx at all? Perhaps they have a dealer somewhere near you?

Good luck with your quest. Sorry that I can't be of any more help!

Happy Grilling,

Mike
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#3 User is offline   seasoned griller 

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 03:14 PM

Thanks for the reply. BBQ Galore here carries the Lynx and the salesman likes them, but I assume he works on commission so I don't know if his advice is impartial. I probably cook steaks the most, ribeyes and filets so if searing is superior, I will get a lot of use out of it. I don't like steaks "Pittsburg," or charred completely black on the outside and rare in the middle--I don't really like the outer crust that crusty, but I like steakhouse steaks which are generally cooked or seared at high temperature without the charred effect. I also have heard that cooking over 400 degrees can generate carcinogens, but I don't know if this is junk science or accurate information. The grill salesmen said that as long as meat is marinated, it's immune from the carcinogen affect, which also sounds like hocus pocus to me. I don't know if the lack of Lynx users is just a function of price or if there aren't many happy customers out there. I read about one that had a bad experience buying a poorly converted Lynx on the internet, and one where Lynx wouldn't fix a built in because the owner was not the original purchaser. I guess the older you are the shorter their warranty, statistically speaking. JRH

View Postmnlang, on Apr 24 2008, 03:57 PM, said:

SG -

Welcome to the forum!

My first observation is, isn't it great to have choices! Unfortunately, I can offer about zero advice on the Lynx. I hope others can potentially shed some light for you. Seeing that you are a long time Weber owner, you are already familiar with what the Weber name gives you. It appears that you have also been following the Weber "Made in/Assembled in USA" thread that has made the rounds.



The Weber rotisserie works great. Although I have had the rotisserie on the kettle for "donkey years" (as my wife would say), I never really used it as much until I bought the 650. Although cooking a bird indirect will yield great results, the rotisserie works even better. I will never buy a roto chicken in the store when I know I can go home and do the exact same thing.



Good question...and one which I can't answer. I know that I am happy searing at 700 degrees on the 650 and others that have the 670/470 seem to like the gas sear. I guess part of my justification would be based on how much I planned to use the sear burner. Although I do cook a lot of red meat, I do a lot of other grilling too. It just depends on what your personal habits are going to be.

Have you contacted Lynx at all? Perhaps they have a dealer somewhere near you?

Good luck with your quest. Sorry that I can't be of any more help!

Happy Grilling,

Mike

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#4 User is offline   Flomaster 

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 04:14 PM

View Postseasoned griller, on Apr 24 2008, 01:14 PM, said:

I also have heard that cooking over 400 degrees can generate carcinogens, but I don't know if this is junk science or accurate information. The grill salesmen said that as long as meat is marinated, it's immune from the carcinogen affect, which also sounds like hocus pocus to me. JRH


JRH not sure what he was talking about carcinogens, but I ran a Restaurant "CHIPOTLE MEXICAN GRILL" and our grill temp was a min of 480 and no higher than 500 preferred temp was 490ish. thats the temp on the grill itself we cooked top tip sirloin and boneless chicken breasts on it and it left wonderfully char marks with juicy meat in the middle.

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#5 User is offline   seasoned griller 

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 09:55 AM

http://www.sciencene...050219/food.asp

As to the cancer risk, here is a link to one of the articles regarding meet cooked too long at high temperatures forming carcinogens. This article also states that marinating or cooking the meat in the microwave first can alleviate the risk. I can probably find articles claiming the microwave causes cancer too though.

View PostFlomaster, on Apr 24 2008, 05:14 PM, said:

JRH not sure what he was talking about carcinogens, but I ran a Restaurant "CHIPOTLE MEXICAN GRILL" and our grill temp was a min of 480 and no higher than 500 preferred temp was 490ish. thats the temp on the grill itself we cooked top tip sirloin and boneless chicken breasts on it and it left wonderfully char marks with juicy meat in the middle.

-=Jason=-

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#6 User is offline   Flomaster 

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 11:12 AM

hrm well thats ok chicken was on the grill 6 minutes per side steak was on the grill 3-4 minutes per side.
I'll have to give that article and read.
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#7 User is offline   cuskit 

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 12:42 PM

Hmmmmm, thanks for the link to the cancer article. I read it and am no more concerned than I was a couple of years ago when this suddenly became big news. I don't bury my head in the sand, but if we were to take heed of all the warnings out there, we would slowly starve ourselves to death. I believe common sense, a careful and conservative attitude towards certain foods and cooking habits can help prevent or reduce the risks involved with all foods, regardless of the preparation methods. Remember - we all have to live to a certain style of life, and if the value of that existence is constantly paramount in our minds and dictating our eating habits, our enjoyment and quality of life will certainly suffer. Perhaps certain trade offs and compromises are necessary for us to prevail in a world of risks at a decent level of quality of life, and we should perceive these articles not as paranoid obstacles to that enjoyment, but simply preventative measures taken in stride and acceptable allowances.

I can't wait for tonights dinner - a seared and blackened NY strip steak, dripping with it's carcinogens and toxic bi-product waste, all of which contribute to the excellent texture and taste that makes me salivate in anticipation! :lol:

Mike

Edit: Seasoned Griller: rereading my post, I noticed it might be taken the wrong way. In no way, shape or form was I attempting to diminish the the cautionary post you presented, I'm just making light of the effects of these articles. I certainly appreciate the trouble you went to in your research, and the concern for the effects of this article on our health and well being. I commend you for bringing this to our attention and thank you for the excellent post. It contains great value and deserves our consideration and respect!
Mike
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#8 User is offline   bluesin 

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 12:57 PM

Its well known that a good bottle of wine with your dinner will enable you to eat whatever you want and live to be a hundred and twelve:>)

Well at least that's my story and I'm sticking to it until I drop dead, which might be tomorrow or 66 years from now!!!

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#9 User is offline   gooch68 

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 05:21 PM

I've gone to this website as they have lots of video demonstrations for many of the higher end grills. If you click on the link, you will see 6 vidoes to view, below the image of the grill. I've seen most of them and they pretty much say the Fire Magic is the best seller along with the highest reviews for customer satisfaction. Their videoes show a breakdown of internal components, outer components, heat tests and grilling demonstrations.

I think the Lynx would be a great choice. Along with Fire Magic, Capital grill, DCS, Kalamazoo, OCI, PGS, Solaire, Twin Eagles and even the Weber. Watch the videos on there and you should be able to get a better idea.

http://www.shopperschoice.com/item_name_Ly...em_1529377.html
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#10 User is offline   seasoned griller 

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Posted 05 May 2008 - 04:12 PM

Well, I broke down and bought the Lynx thinking that I would regret not getting it since I had the budget and the authorization from the better half. I think if cost was a prime decision variable, the Weber probably is the better choice. I used it for the first time Sat night. My first impressions were that for 25,000 BTU per burner, it does not pre-heat any faster than the old Weber. It took about 10 minutes to get to 400+. After pre-heating the gas burners, I turned on the sear burner and waited 3-5 minutes per the instructions to preheat. I put on a couple of filets, but it didn't sear as well as my old Weber when it was warmed up. I think I may have to preheat the sear burner longer than the instructions say. Also, the ceramic bricks seem to encourage more flare ups than the Weber flavorizer bars on the old Genesis. The steaks didn't sear so much, but I still overcooked them though I use the touch test for doneness. I suppose it will take a little getting used to and I won't base my opinion on the first try. It looks impressive and it has a ton of cooking space and cooking flexibility. I guess time will tell whether it cooks faster or better. I didn't get any replies from people who owned a Lynx and still think either no one does own one or no one that is serious enough about grilling to go to a forum on the topic owns one. In any event, I will try to post some pictures, etc. if I can get my grill and camera together at the same time, and then my camera, cord and computer.
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#11 User is offline   Fuhgetaboudit 

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Posted 13 May 2008 - 02:23 PM

SG:

Any more input on the new Lynx ?

I am considering a Lynx, Viking or an Alfresco. I do not see too much info at all on the Alfresco, although I went to BBQGuys.com who dpo the Shopperschoice.com video's and watched all the different Video's on the higher end grills. Of course my wife thinks I'm nuts to consider such a high priced grill. She's a Charcoal fan and thinks a Weber Performer would suit our needs just fine and with the savings we could take a nice Cruise together.

Well, any more feedback would be appreciated on the Lynx, and Congrats on your new Grill!!
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#12 User is offline   gunksny 

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Posted 22 August 2008 - 07:20 AM

Hi - I've been doing some research for the grill I'll be putting into my outdoor kitchen. Here are a few thoughts I have.

As far as fit and finish, there is little doubt the Lynx is amazing - a true work of art with some really nice touches like cool blue led lighting for the knobs, lid assist springs, halogens under the hood, polished edges/seams etc. But lets face it, none of those contributes to performance or cooking and if you need a spring to help you lift the lid, you probably don't have any business operating a grill!

Lynx supposedly has tremendous customer service and also has brass burners which are supposed to last forever and give more even heat. But, they take longer to heat up as the OP pointed out. I've used my friends Lynx a few times and found it frustrating in how long it takes to get up to temp, and it doesn't seem to run as hot as other grills I've used. I'm also not a huge fan of their grate design.

The DCS grills just didn't feel that well made to me. Plus, they use ceramic rods that are easily damaged. I've been taking a hard look at the Capital Performance line (former DCS guys I think). Capital uses stainless burners which heat up faster and they use a cast stainless cooking grid which also heats up faster and retains heat better. I spoke to a dealer who carries both and he said he prefers how the Lynx looks, but he prefers cooking on the Capital. At 20% less $$, its a compelling option.

I think at this level (>$2k), you're shopping for aesthetics and longevity. Spending 2 or 3x more doesn't necessarily get you a much better performing grill, but it will probably look nicer and last a lot longer.

As an aside - has anyone checked out the Electrolux grills? They are known for vacuums here, but overseas, they are big in appliances.
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